Buy Used
£0.71
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Former Library book. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Resurrection Men: An Inspector Rebus Novel (Inspector Rebus Mysteries) Hardcover – Mar 2003

4.4 out of 5 stars 78 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Mar 2003
£0.02
CD-ROM
"Please retry"
£59.99
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Little Brown and Company (Mar. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316766844
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316766845
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 3.8 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (78 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,247,432 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Rebus is back. Resurrection Men, the 13th DI Rebus novel, finds Ian Rankin’s doughty detective off the case. He explodes at his superior DCS Gill Templar over the increasingly frustrating murder inquiry into the savage killing of an Edinburgh art dealer and his punishment is a spell cooling his heels at the Scottish Police College in central Scotland. Rebus balks at his "retraining" but he’s not alone: he’s part of an ill-assorted group of similar officers--all with an attitude problem and a dislike of the institution they find themselves in. Given an old unsolved case to work on the group is obliged to polish up their teamwork while supervisors assess the reprobates. But some of the team have secrets not unconnected to the case they’ve been handed and Rebus finds that anything goes when it comes to keeping the past obscured.

This is Rankin in top form with Rebus rejuvenated by the edgy new milieu he’s dropped into. Complicating things, the Scottish Crime Squad asks Rebus to act as a link to someone who can deliver the inside dirt on an old nemesis, gangster "Big Ger" Cafferty. In Edinburgh, Detective Sergeant Siobhan Clarke has to take over the case of the murdered art dealer and, like Rebus, finds herself getting closer to the unpleasant Mr Cafferty. Forget the miscast John Hannah in the TV movies, this is the real Rebus: gritty, idiomatic and etched in prose that wastes nae a word in its redefining of the crime novel. --Barry Forshaw --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

This is Rankin at his best, and, boy, that's saying something (TIME OUT)

Quite apart from their excellence as detective novels, every one of them adds something interesting to our understanding of the social landscape of Edinburgh, which Rankin portrays with such subtlety and sensitivity (THE TIMES)

As is usual with Rebus novels, the plot is so thick you could stand a spoon up in it ... Rankin's Rebus novels should be required reading for anyone whose knowledge of Edinburgh has been derived from visits to the Festival ... Rankin is still very much a Category A crime writer (SUNDAY TELEGRAPH)

Resurrection Men is Rebus's 13th outing, and it bears all the qualities that have established Rankin as one of Britain's leading novelists in any genre: a powerful sense of place; a redefinition of Scotland and its past; persuasive dialogue; and a growing compassion among its characters' (NEW STATESMAN)

As Ian Rankin and Inspector Rebus are regular visitors to the bestsellers list I see no reason why Resurrection Men should not follow that well-trodden path. All the Rankin virtues are present - compulsive readability, sharp dialogue, the believable pettiness of the police procedural background and, looming over the book as ever, the formidable presence of the Jekyll-and-Hyde city of Edinburgh. There is also, at times, a wonderful economy that can capture an entire atmosphere in a few words (DAILY MAIL)

Rankin is pretty much unrivalled at the vivid delineation of character. John Rebus, tormented, dogged, moral, his prickliness repelling those he most wants to attract, remains one of the great creations of modern mystery fiction. Resurrection Men is right up there with the best of this terrific series (OBSERVER)

In the Rebus books Rankin has created an Edinburgh that is textured, vivid, plausible, perhaps even real ... Even viewed solely as a whodunit, Resurrection Men stands some distance above the competition. Rankins juggles three tense and fascinating, apparently unrelated cases, each of which for a lesser writer would be a book in itself, before late in the novel drawing them together in a clever, unexpected but utterly convincing denouement (DAILY EXPRESS)

Rankin is a phenomenon. He has made Edinburgh an imaginary or rather fully imagined city as nobody, except Spark, has done since Stevenson ... With each book I find myself wondering if he can pull it off again; so far he has never failed. I would rather read Rankin than any other living Scottish writer except Muriel Spark and William McIlvanney ... They call his work crime fiction, but the adjective is superfluous ... these novels are totally absorbing. Once I start reading one, all else goes by the board till I have finished it (Allan Massie SPECTATOR)

The thirteenth novel in Rankin's Rebus series is his most mature work yet. His pacing is so acute and the supporting characters are so well drawn that this book escapes the shackles of the crime novel genre and can be classed as great fiction, full stop (TIMES PLAY) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product Description

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
First Sentence
Then why are you here?" Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Wow - what a start to the New Year! Rebus is my hero, and here he is, as crabbit and wasted as ever. Like many others, I stayed up late on Hogmanay, and into the wee small hours of the New Year, but this year I wasn't partying. Instead I absent-mindedly kissed my husband at midnight, and went straight back to my book.
I have devoured all of the Rebus books so far, and "Resurrection Men" must be one of the best crime novels ever written. A twisting, paranoid tale (as Rebus himself quotes, "Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they're not out to get you...") A story of bent cops, an old case dredged out of Rebus's past, and DS Clarke becoming more and more like her mentor. I couldn't put it down.
Comment 39 of 41 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
A mug full of tea flies through the air just missing the head of the Detective in charge. This time grumpy loner Rebus has gone too far and rather than being given early retirement he is sent on a refresher course to retrain alongside several other fallen coppers. When he arrives they are given a cold case to try and solve that Rebus remembers all too well. Is there more to his retraining than first meets the eye? Meanwhile Siobhan, Rebus' police partner, has been left on a case investigating the death of an art dealer. Does the cold case and this new case have any reflection on one another and why does Rebus' nemesis' name keep popping up?

`Resurrection Men' is the first Ian Rankin novel that I have read and perhaps reading them out of sequence is a mistake. The story is a slow burn and is reliant more on the characters and their motives that an actual story. The relations ship between Rebus and Cafferty keeps reoccurring and as someone who has no prior knowledge of their interaction it left me cold. However, I can imagine that fans will enjoy their to and fro. The mystery itself is reasonable, but a little slow for my liking, a lot of the book follows British police procedure to the letter and that can be a little dull. I will aim to read the rest of the books in order so that I can develop a closer link with the characters. However, for new readers I do not think this is a good introduction to the Rebus books.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
"Resurrection Men [Abridged] Audio CD" is read by its Scots author, Ian Rankin, and James Macpherson, of Glasgow, and heaven knows, they've got that authentic Scottish burr. (Americans, beware!!) "Resurrection Men" is the fifteenth in the Detective Inspector John Rebus police procedural series by the outstanding, increasingly appreciated Scots author Ian Rankin. In contrast to most Scots mystery writers at work now, Rankin sets his best-of-tartan-noir universe in the east coast Edinburgh, rather than the west coast Glasgow; it's a more beautiful, smaller city, the capital of the country, where you might expect the crime to be white collar, rather than blue. But Rebus always seems to find enough to keep busy. And what's tartan noir when it's at home, you ask? A bloodthirsty, bloody-minded business, to be sure, more violent than the average British mystery, but, thankfully, leavened a bit with that dark Scots humor. Written (duh!) by Scots.

As the book opens, Rebus has been sent undercover to Tulliallan Police College, where recruits are trained, and troublesome older officers sent to resurrect their careers. Sir David Strathern, chief constable of Lothian and Borders Police, Rebus's permanent posting, suspects several of the officers currently at the college are dirty, and he wants Rebus to find the proof. To Rebus, of course, this is a difficult assignment. Aside from the obvious, St. Leonard's, his station house, is in the midst of an engrossing enquiry: Edward Marber, local art dealer, has been done in, and many of the usual suspects are known to Rebus. The policeman finds the college assignment doubly difficult because, for the unsolved case the officers there are always given to work, they're given a case they've never been given before.
Read more ›
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Resurrection Men is the thirteenth in the Rebus series written by Ian Rankin and in my opinion it is one of the best.

Right from the start Rankin establishes that this book is very much a fifty-fifty split between our hero and his understudy Siobhan Clark. No longer working on the same cases but from different angles like in previous books, the two are now not even in the same police station for the majority of this book.

Rebus is back in training as his temper has finally got the better of him. Whilst looking into the murder of a local art dealer, Rebus’s frustration reaches boiling point and he throws a cup of tea at his commanding officer. Finally having gone too far he is banished to the Scottish Police College for retraining leaving Siobhan and the team to attempt to solve the murder without him.

I found this book to be a very, very good read. All the usual elements of an Ian Rankin book are present. The story as usual is intricate and moved along at a very fast pace and at times I found myself just as confused as Rebus as to who the good guys and who the bad guys were.

All in all I found this to be a very satisfying read and very enjoyable. I would highly recommend this to any fan of the crime genre and to Rebus fans in particular.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback