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Respighi: Concerto In Modo Misolidio, Concerto a 5 CD


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Respighi: Concerto In Modo Misolidio, Concerto a 5 + Respighi: Piano Concerto / Fantasia Slava
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Product details

  • Orchestra: Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Capella Istropolitana
  • Conductor: Howard Griffiths, Ewald Danel
  • Composer: Ottorino Respighi
  • Audio CD (15 Mar 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Naxos
  • ASIN: B00000IMFX
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 49,542 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Concerto in modo misolidio, P. 145: Moderato16:14Album Only
Listen  2. Concerto in modo misolidio, P. 145: Lento 8:33Album Only
Listen  3. Concerto in modo misolidio, P. 145: Allegro energico (Passacaglia)10:32Album Only
Listen  4. Concerto a cinque, P. 174: Moderato - Allegro - Grave 6:59£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Concerto a cinque, P. 174: Adagio12:44Album Only
Listen  6. Concerto a cinque, P. 174: Allegro vivo - Allegro moderato - Largo 5:54£0.89  Buy MP3 

Product Description

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Mark A. Meldon TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 July 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Ottorino Respighi, aside from being one of Italy's leading 20th century composers, was also something of a musicologist, researching and editing ancient music, especially Gregorian Chant. The two works on this interesting Naxos CD are founded on Respighi's research and transcriptions of such early music. Nowadays, transcriptions are rather frowned upon, but these works are perhaps best described as "developments". I think that the pianist Konstantin Scherbakov and his colleagues makes as good a case that can be made for these pieces; they are much less well-known than many of Respighi's symphonic poems Respighi: Symphonic Poems.

The Concerto in modo Misolidio dates from 1925 and carries a flavour of plainchant throughout. It is a pleasant way to spend a fairly dreamy 35 minutes. The support from the Slovak RSO and Howard Griffiths is very good. The second work, Concerto a cinque, dates from 1933 and is scored for oboe, trumpet, violin, double bass and piano, with strings. It is rather like a Baroque multiple concerto, and is also very nice. Here the band is the highly-regarded Capella Istropolitana under Ewald Danel.

Interestingly, the works were recorded in 1995 and 1996, but were only released in 1999 by Naxos. The sound quality is very fine throughout, as is the playing.

These are some of Respighi's lesser works compared to his tone poems, but they are well-worth hearing and this Naxos CD is most likely the best and most cost-effective way to do so.
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By DAVID BRYSON TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 Jun 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
There are so many good things about this disc, and I have such strong reasons for wishing to recommend it to other music lovers, that I want to give it the full 5 stars despite not being one hundred percent happy with the recorded sound. The first reason is simply that the music is generally unfamiliar, and the second is that it is very good music. Respighi was a musical scholar and antiquarian as well as being the composer of three famous tone-poems celebrating aspects of the city of Rome. Use of the ancient modes in the era of diatonic major and minor keys had never totally lapsed. You can hear them in Handel here and there, Beethoven goes modal at `seid umschlungen' in the finale of the ninth as well writing a complete slow movement for one of his quartets in the Lydian mode, and Brahms makes conspicuous use of modal effects in the second piano concerto, the fourth symphony and the clarinet quintet, to cite just obvious instances. However for an entire piano concerto to be proclaimed as being Mixolydian we have to wait for Respighi.

The Mixolydian mode is like the scale of G major with the F# leading note flattened into F natural. The modes are so strongly associated with Palestrina and the early polyphonists that they inevitably create a churchy impression, and my next reason for recommending this disc so warmly is the impressive sense of prayerful solemnity that the soloist Konstantin Scherbakov evokes in the concerto's first movement. In this he is probably helped by the sort of piano tone that the recording provides, but for all that I don't entirely like it. The piano has a very slightly muffled sound, as if the dampers were partially applied in passages that are loud and/or chordal.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
New Found Favorite 10 Dec 2001
By Matt Barger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I recently bought this disk and have fallen in love with the music. As usual, Naxos delivers a powerfull recording of a lesser known piece at a very manageable price! The Mixolydian Concerto for piano and orchestra is played marvelously. The piano both sparkles and brakes with intensity worthy of Respighi's own praise. The use of big orchestral sounds and extreme dynamics will be familiar to anyone who enjoys Respighi. The first movement is a energetic frolic in the key of G mixolydian. The treatment of the chant here is very interesting. The second movement begins very slowly with a beautiful melody. The second movement melds into the third with a quick rhythmic pick up. The entire work is colored with original harmonies and melodic treatments that are given proper treatment in this performance. Also available on this disk is an interesting chamber work. The instrumentation chosen is very unique. Notable is the trumpeter who is able to achieve an impressive dynamic balance with the rest of the ensamble. (piano, oboe, violin, bass) The Concerto a cinque is at first less accessible than most of Respighi's works due to it's dissonances and themes, but listeners with an ear for 20th Century music will find this piece gratifying. All in all, anyone who enjoys early twentieth century music will fall in love with this music as I have.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Superb Mixolydian 18 May 2011
By ricardo_guerrero - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Naxos can always be counted on to deliver both standard and nonstandard repertoire in high quality fashion and at affordable prices. I'm happy they keep doing this, despite the fact that classical music CDs are seldom purchased these days. That said, this Respighi disc is a very enjoyable listen. The Mixolydian Mode Concerto has the usual quotient of Respighian sizzle - it is rarely heard or performed, which is a shame. Konstantin Scherbakov plays it superbly, the tonal and atonal fires burning brightly throughout, from the rather unsettled opening that suddenly transforms into a sizzling cadenza, traversing through the eloquently winding development to the robust final movement with its trademark cliffhanger ending. The Concerto a Cinque evokes Ernest Bloch's Concerto Grossos, which I have never been crazy about but found interesting music.
MIXED MIXOLYDIAN 31 May 2014
By DAVID BRYSON - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
There are so many good things about this disc, and I have such strong reasons for wishing to recommend it to other music lovers, that I want to give it the full 5 stars despite not being one hundred percent happy with the recorded sound. The first reason is simply that the music is generally unfamiliar, and the second is that it is very good music. Respighi was a musical scholar and antiquarian as well as being the composer of three famous tone-poems celebrating aspects of the city of Rome. Use of the ancient modes in the era of diatonic major and minor keys had never totally lapsed. You can hear them in Handel here and there, Beethoven goes modal at `seid umschlungen' in the finale of the ninth as well writing a complete slow movement for one of his quartets in the Lydian mode, and Brahms makes conspicuous use of modal effects in the second piano concerto, the fourth symphony and the clarinet quintet, to cite just obvious instances. However for an entire piano concerto to be proclaimed as being Mixolydian we have to wait for Respighi.

The Mixolydian mode is like the scale of G major with the F# leading note flattened into F natural. The modes are so strongly associated with Palestrina and the early polyphonists that they inevitably create a churchy impression, and my next reason for recommending this disc so warmly is the impressive sense of prayerful solemnity that the soloist Konstantin Scherbakov evokes in the concerto's first movement. In this he is probably helped by the sort of piano tone that the recording provides, but for all that I don't entirely like it. The piano has a very slightly muffled sound, as if the dampers were partially applied in passages that are loud and/or chordal. The piano is probably also a bit too prominent, this being a tendency in concerto recording that the 20th century never totally shook off. To complete my little list of quibbles there is an effective sense of menace in the timpani sequences in the first movement, but the drums are also pushed towards us in a way that I didn't think suitable.

All that said, the performance of the concerto is excellent, with the Russian soloist seeming totally at home with the Italian composer's descent into the profundities of his own special tradition. Respighi shows another side of his kaleidoscopic personality in the Concerto for Five. Commentators and reviewers rightly note the model as being the baroque concerto grosso in its 3-movement version, like Bach's Brandenburgs. What I have been surprised not to see remarked on is the resemblance to Stravinsky that seems highly obvious to me. Here I have no objections to the recorded sound, and I wish to compliment all five participants and I suppose also the conductor who has for some reason been thought necessary. For one minor but delightful touch let me draw attention to the violinist's perfect long sustained notes at the close of the slow movement.

There is a liner note that is quite useful up to a point but also a little odd. Very welcome are the notes on the performers, and the background information on Respighi is interesting as well. The remarks on the music (at least in the English essay, which is the only one of the three that I have tried to read) are of a familiar type that I lament at intervals, telling us what we can hear perfectly well for ourselves. The oddity is that while the German and French essays are attributed to their authors the English offering is for some inscrutable reason anonymous.

Something else that I would be interested to understand better is why the recordings, done in 1995 and 1996, were apparently not released until a few years later. I am only too grateful that they have been given to us at all, and in my usual way I shall end with my often-repeated tribute to Naxos for their enormous service to the musical public in supplying us with so much out-of-the-way music at such modest cost.
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