Start reading Requiems for the Departed on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Requiems for the Departed
 
 

Requiems for the Departed [Kindle Edition]

Garry Kilworth , John Grant , Adrian McKinty , Sam Millar , Stuart Neville , Brian McGilloway , Ken Bruen , Maxim Jakubowski , Mike Stone , Gerard Brennan
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £6.99
Kindle Price: £2.01 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: £4.98 (71%)
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
Borrow this book for free on a Kindle device with Amazon Prime. Learn more about Kindle Owners' Lending Library.
Join Prime to borrow this book at no cost.
The Kindle Owners' Lending Library gives you access to thousands of books, including New York Times bestsellers, to borrow and read for free.
  • Borrow a book as frequently as once per month
  • No due dates — keep books as long as you like and return them when it's time for something new
  • Read on any Amazon Kindle device

Amazon Prime members also enjoy:
  • Unlimited streaming of thousands of popular movies and TV shows with Prime Instant Video
  • FREE Two-Day Shipping on millions of items, with no minimum order size

For more information about the Kindle Owners' Lending Library visit our help page.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £2.01  
Paperback £5.30  
Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deal: At least 60% off
Each day we unveil a new book deal at a specially discounted price--for that day only. Learn more about the Kindle Daily Deal or sign up for the Kindle Daily Deal Newsletter to receive free e-mail notifications about each day's deal.


Product Description

Product Description

Irish Crime. Irish Myths.

Requiems for the Departed contains seventeen short stories, inspired by Irish mythology, from some of the finest contemporary writers in the business.

Watch the children of Conchobar return to their mischievous ways, meet ancient Celtic royalty, and follow druids and banshees as they are set loose in the new Irish underbelly, murder and mayhem on their minds.

Featuring top shelf tales by Ken Bruen, Maxim Jakubowski, Stuart Neville, Brian McGilloway, Adrian McKinty, Sam Millar, John Grant, Garry Kilworth, T.A. Moore and many more.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 443 KB
  • Print Length: 338 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1451539681
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Morrigan Books (10 Mar 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00466HFIO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #119,917 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The sins of the living 12 July 2010
Format:Paperback
Ancient Celtic myths tell of vengeful thieves, backstabbing comrades, inebriated thugs, and wicked women. This collection brings characters inspired by these dubious role models into (mostly) today's Ireland. Their mobile phoning and pill-popping counterparts rely on criminal pursuits - and the pursuit of criminals. The beer, the wanton women, and the chemicals may be more exotic in the retellings, but the (mostly) grim tales of haunting, revenge, and payback capture the raw scenes of the original tales, full of passion, release, death, and vendettas.

Editors Gerard Brennan and Mike Stone arrange 17 entries. Stuart Neville opens the anthology with a lively take on his Armagh hometown's Queen Macha. Her erstwhile latest paramour, as he approaches her modern incarnation, reflects: "Back then he'd have done anything for a taste of the Queen, but as she took the last of him, his fingers tangled in her dyed crimson hair, he noticed the blood congealing on her knuckles." Sam Millar spins his shamus Karl Kane's saga wittily. "If I'd been any more sociable, I'd have needed a condom." Kane and colleagues investigate, of all places in Belfast, a Jewish abattoir. As with many authors here, Millar ingeniously arranges venerable symbols into surprising patterns.

T.A. Moore's "Red Milk" in its mayhem reminds me of a savage screenplay. A wake may seem too familiar, but this scene gains sharpness: "They sat around a table in their black shabby plumage, drinking sweet tea and saying the faults of the dead like a rosary. Go in there, and they wouldn't be backward about coming forward with the sins of the living either." Later, one sinner warns another: "I will beat you `til both sides of your face match." Moore renders her snarling, shouting characters vividly.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Irish Mythology WitH A Contemporary Twist 18 Mar 2011
Format:Paperback
A short story collection inspired by Irish mythology - a really intriguing premise. Some of the stories take the same myth (such as that of Queen Macha who appears to have been the Goddess of both sex and war and thus makes for a great femme fatale) and put their own slant on them. A couple are set in the past, one is set in the future, most are set in the present day and these contemporary twists on the myths and legends work particularly well. There are two things I particularly love about short stories. Firstly, it gives favourite authors the opportunity to do something different; secondly, it gives me the possibility of discovering new authors. In the case of this book, it also taught me some fascinating things about Irish mythology. Some of my favourite stories were Stuart Neville's QUEEN OF THE HILL - inspired by the aforementioned Queen Macha - which tells the story of a strong, sexy but very scary woman; T A Moore's RED MILK - a truly deliciously nasty tale of drug deals, rival gangs and revenge; Adrian McKinty's chilling and atmospheric DIARMAID AND GRAINNE which left me feeling really sad; and Garbhan Downey's FIRST TO SCORE which is a wickedly sly and funny story about football - brilliant stuff, I'm grinning again as I think about it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars Requiems for the departed. 8 July 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I chose this rating because I didn't enjoy all the stories, some I found very strange and hard to follow.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2.0 out of 5 stars Bits and pieces 25 May 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Too many different parts, none really catching or worth reading. Sorry not at all my favorite. To other readers: could be yours.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Old patterns of Celtic deceit, new ways of Irish mayhem 6 July 2010
By John L Murphy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Ancient Celtic myths tell of vengeful thieves, backstabbing comrades, inebriated thugs, and wicked women. This collection brings characters inspired by these dubious role models into (mostly) today's Ireland. Their mobile phoning and pill-popping counterparts rely on criminal pursuits - and the pursuit of criminals. The beer, the wanton women, and the chemicals may be more exotic in the retellings, but the (mostly) grim tales of haunting, revenge, and payback capture the raw scenes of the original tales, full of passion, release, death, and vendettas.

Editors Gerard Brennan and Mike Stone arrange 17 entries. (Note: Sam Millar did not write this book and neither did Ken Bruen contrary to some listings: they were contributors to this anthology.) Stuart Neville opens the anthology with a lively take on his Armagh hometown's Queen Macha. Her erstwhile latest paramour, as he approaches her modern incarnation, reflects: "Back then he'd have done anything for a taste of the Queen, but as she took the last of him, his fingers tangled in her dyed crimson hair, he noticed the blood congealing on her knuckles." Sam Millar spins his shamus Karl Kane's saga wittily. "If I'd been any more sociable, I'd have needed a condom." Kane and colleagues investigate, of all places in Belfast, a Jewish abattoir. As with many authors here, Millar ingeniously arranges venerable symbols into surprising patterns.

T.A. Moore's "Red Milk" in its mayhem reminds me of a savage screenplay. A wake may seem too familiar, but this scene gains sharpness: "They sat around a table in their black shabby plumage, drinking sweet tea and saying the faults of the dead like a rosary. Go in there, and they wouldn't be backward about coming forward with the sins of the living either." Later, one sinner warns another: "I will beat you `til both sides of your face match." Moore renders her snarling, shouting characters vividly. As with other stories, hers takes place among stables and beasts. The ancient tales shared these scenes, but not as chronicles of the cooking of chemicals or the distribution of drugs.

Tony Bailie serves up druidry and reincarnation as revenge. Maxim Jakubowski follows the triple goddess the Morrigan through lowlife Dublin. Arlene Hunt regales us with horse trading. Ken Bruen in his characteristically staccato style conjures up the banshee. Three authors in their introductory notes credit the `70s electric folk-rock band Horslips for inspiration. I recommend their albums "The Táin" and "The Book of Invasions" (see my reviews) as a soundtrack to amplify these tales. These renditions of passions and betrayals of ancient Ireland filtered through traditional and rock music share the bloody, loud, and ornery nature of characters in these pages.

As the collection continues, stories start to echo one another. For instance, the tragic lovers Diarmuid and Gráinne earn a similarly sad version from Adrian McKinty.Then, Garbhan Downey revamps their tale into a lusty, silly send-up. Warrior clans evolve into Derry's football rivals. Teams stock their ranks with immigrants from Chechnya, Russia, and Brazil. This comments cleverly on today's cosmopolitan Irish society.

Two roughly paired stories at the center of this collection evoke poignantly another cultural transition. They are the only two stories not taking place in contemporary Ireland. John McAllister sketches how a rough justice emerged as Christianity loomed over 5th century pagan Ireland. Una McCormack shifts a few years back in this same setting. She imagines a confrontation between Celtic and Roman methods to correct injustice, through the arrival of the boy who will become Patrick. Both stories capture the uneasy atmosphere of an island filled with clans - loyal to pagan gods and brutal customs - who must soon face the coming of Christianity.

Neville Thompson's "The Children of Gear" sets the story of The Children of Lír among the addicts and dealers plaguing today's Dublin. This sparely told tale haunted me as much as the original, with its abandoned children, cruel stepmother, and trapped father. Dave Hutchinson, like Millar, puts an attenuated Jewish connection into his story; his opens as a reality show features "the last surviving and very aged member of U2." One old woman has faint blue tattoos like many from the past (and our present) generations; another upright gent conceals in his trousers his risque piercing, a Prince Albert. Hutchinson directs us to look backward from the prospect of the near future. Today's daring poses will turn frail and awkward soon enough.

In the closing story, "The Life Business", the fantasy master who writes as John Grant draws upon his "real name" and real-life teenage stint as a British cadet. He integrates disturbing and emotional reveries into his shape-shifting characters. His story rattled me the most. Grant eerily channels otherworldly senses into a psychological study of identity.

I'd caution that if you lack familiarity with these Irish myths, some stories may elude your full grasp. All contributors give introductions, yet some gloss over their original inspirations. The stories fall into three sections paralleling standard classifications of the Ulster cycle, folk figures, and Fianna warriors, but the editors could have followed through on reminding readers of the context for this archaic arrangement. A couple of stories, very compressed, moved too swiftly for me to grasp them.

All the same, for those who wish to acquaint themselves with the original stories, sample Frank Delaney's "Legends of the Celts" or Mary Heaney's "Over Nine Waves." Or check out those two Horslips albums. With the combination of murder, mayhem, and madness on the page matched with what blasts from your speakers, this will transport you back to the spirit of a Celtic past, and the multicultural island's present. This book's full of entertaining slaughter, gory slug fests, and, being Irish, the lingering touch of inevitable longing, heartache, and loss.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Short Crime Fiction + Irish Mythology = Fiendish Noir 28 Jun 2010
By BV Lawson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Gerard Brennan, he of the excellent Irish-themed crime fiction blog Crime Scene N.I., has joined with Mike Stone in editing an anthology of short stories by some of the top Irish authors writing today. All of the 17 stories in Requiems for the Departed are inspired by Irish mythology (not in a supernatural way, for the most part), but you don't have to be an expert on the subject to enjoy the stories--and the authors helpfully summarize each myth for you at the beginning of their tale to bring you up to speed. They're divided into three semi-geographical headings, Ulster, Myth, and Fianna.

Stuart Nevill's "Queen of the Hill" starts things off with a bang of noir (literally), based on the legend of Macha, goddess of ancient Ireland and one of the original femme fatales. Tony Black's "Hound of Culann" and Arlene Hunt's "Sliabh Ban" are stories with animal themes, Hunt's focusing on a woman scorned in love and horse-racing. Two authors have series characters from their novels making appearances--Sam Millar's hard-boiled P.I. Karl Kane who chases down the elusive "Red Hand of Ulster" serial killer (a story to be expanded into a Millar novel in 2011) and Brian McGilloway's Inspector Benedict Devlin, in a story drawing from the myth of the poet Finnegas and the Salmon of Knowledge as Devlin tracks a murderous fish poacher.

As Brennan says, "The children of Conchobar are back to their old mischievous ways. Ancient Celtic royalty, druids and banshees are set loose in the new Irish underbelly with murder and mayhem on their minds." Settle in for a feast of crime fiction, with a tasting of Celtic mythology on the side, in Requiems for the Departed and enjoy the offerings from Ken Bruen, Maxim Jakubowski, Adrian McKinty, John Grant, Garry Kilworth, T.A. Moore and other fine craftsmen.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quality Stories 18 Sep 2010
By Dman4227 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
In my opinion, it is difficult to rate a book of short stories. There is a mix of ratings that I would give to the stories in this anthology.
The concept of using Irish mythology with a modern twist piqued my interest from the get-go. Most of the stories had a great dark vibe to them, but not all of the stories delivered the satisfying dénouement that short stories should have. The biggest surprise for me was the fact that the Ken Bruen story was a bit lacking (I would imagine he is the most recognizable of the names from the anthology). Most of the other authors did a great job helping the book reach its potential. Some of my favorites were:

Stuart Neville's Queen of the Hill: Opening story to the collection and he did a great job of establishing the mood and tone of the book. Dark, dreary, and moody.....my type of story.

Arlene Hunt's Sliabh Ban: When I think of the plots to the stories contained in the book, I think this would have created the least amount of buzz in my mind, yet it was one of the stories that I enjoyed most. Not dark or dreary like most of the other stories, but a satisfying read nonetheless.

Maxim Jakubowski"s A Price to Pay: This story was right up my alley. This is the type of story that makes you hunt out an author's entire collection of work to see what else he has written. I was familiar with Jakubowski before I read this story, but I will be doing my best to get a hold of more stories by him. Dark...dark...dark.

Sam Millar's Red Hand of Ulster: I have reviewed a few of Millar's books, so truth be told, his story was the story I was most interested in reading and I am happy to say that I was not disappointed. One of the best parts of his story was it involved his main protagonist Karl Kane. He also mixes in characters from The Redemption Factory and allows the two sets of characters to interact in a well-written and interesting story. Even those unfamiliar with Millar's works will enjoy this despite not being familiar with the characters. For those few who aren't familiar with his works, this story will show you why he is becoming a must-read author in the noir field of writing. While it was hard for Millar to reach the expectations I had for this story (since I anticipated reading it since I heard the anthology was being published), he didn't disappoint me. It was thrilling to read the liner notes and see that he is working on a new Karl Kane novel and it can't come soon enough. If there is one author in the noir field who deserves more recognition and word of mouth praise it is Millar. I can't say enough about his writing and he takes time to correspond with fans of his work and seem to be a class act that appreciates his fan base.

There were other good stories in the book, but these were the ones I would label as the best. This book is a great way to pass some time with authors you have already enjoyed, but an even better means to find some new authors to seek out.
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything I love about short stories, Noir, and Ireland. 9 May 2014
By Peter H. Burris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
This collection of short stories stands out for its superb wit, a high level of stylish prose, and a wicked blend of folk-lore and heinous crime. Some of the stories, like Ken Bruen's contribution, really point to the reality that, while Americans may have invented noir, the Irish have polished it to new highs while losing none of the menace.
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterful piece of work 11 Mar 2014
By Ayah - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Not knowing much about northern Ireland, except for what I've read in the press about the recently ended conflict there, I found that each author brought wonderful insight into Celtic myths by masterfully linking their stories to modern crime and criminals. A definite must read.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category