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Requiem: By the Photographers Who Died in Vietnam and Indochina Hardcover – 6 Nov 1997

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Jonathan Cape Ltd (6 Nov. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224050583
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224050586
  • Product Dimensions: 31 x 3.4 x 25 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,245,754 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Horst Faas was born in Berlin in 1933. He joined the Keystone Agency in 1951, for whom he covered the Indochina peace negotiations in Geneva in 1954. He joined the Associated Press as a photographer in 1956 and covered wars in the Congo and Algeria, and was later sent to Laos. From 1962 to 1974 he was based in Saigon as the AP's chief reporter for Southeast Asia. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1965 for his work in Vietnam and in 1972 for his photographs of Bangladesh. He has also received the Robert Capa Gold Medal. Since 1976 he has been based in London as the AP's senior editor.



Tim Page's photographic career began in Laos, where at the age of eighteen he covered the civil war for UPI. He photographed the war in Vietnam for the Associated Press, UPI, and Paris Match. He was wounded four times, the final time almost fatally. He returned to England in 1979 and was the subject of the BBC film Mentioned in Dispatches. His search to discover the fate of his friends Sean Flynn and Dana Stone, who disappeared in Cambodia, was the subject of another film, Darkness at the Edge of Town, in 1991, more than twenty years after they vanished. Page's return to Cambodia led him to found the Indochina Media Memorial Foundation in 1994 and was the genesis of Requiem. His books include Tim Page's Nam (1983), Sri Lanka (1984), Ten Years After (1987), Page after Page (1988), Derailed in Uncle Ho's Garden (1990), and Mid-Term Report (1995). --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By "murano3" on 26 Jun. 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book really has some amazing and moving images. I have seen many of the 'vietnam' photography books, but this really is the best I have seen.
Requiem shows many of the last pictures taken by each person along with the moving stories about the photographer and the subject. At the back of the book is the Bio of each of the 135 journalists either MIA or KIA.
If you were only to buy one photography book about Vietnam, make it this one.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. D Roberts VINE VOICE on 10 Dec. 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The photographs in this book are absolutely mind blowing. They are a creditable testament to the memory of the incredibly brave and talented photographers who did not return from Vietnam and Indochina.
Some of the greatest photographers of all time are listed here.
Some of their photographs have remained unseen for some 40 years. Some of the photographs taken were indeed the last visions seen by photographers who were actually killed whilst in the act of taking the photographs themselves.
The first hand reality of the 'at war' experience is brought home to the unitiated reader. To take these shots the photographers were of a necessity extremely close to the action and sometimes in the very midst of it. For their sacrifice in obtaining these images they lost their lives.
One can only sit back with awe at the scenes illustrated and wonder at the suffering, humanity & sometimes lack of it, that perpetuated these conflicts.
These photographers have done a great service in bringing home the reality of war to those who were not there. An amazing and fitting epitaph to those who fought, suffered and died on both sides.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 April 1999
Format: Hardcover
Tim Page worked in Viet Nam during the American period. This book however covers the conflict form the French occupation to the close of the war, and includes some Cambodian images. The most important factor however, is that all the work in this beautifully printed book is that of photographers who died in the war. Tim does not limit himself to the 'allied' side, but includes work from the Communist photographers. All the work is compelling, a lot is moving. There are thumbnail biographies of many of the contributors which adds to the sense of presence. In all an excellent book which should be read and viewed and not merely used a coffee table accessory.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 May 2001
Format: Hardcover
Its just astonishing how loud a photograph can shout. You pic the book up with interest & put it down with reverance. A memorial to those who fell & a tribute to those who gave their life to record them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John P. Jones III TOP 500 REVIEWER on 3 Dec. 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is a truly remarkable collection of photos. The essence of so much of the agony of the wars in Vietnam captured on film. This collection has a central macabre link - all the photographers were killed in the war. Tim Page paid his own "dues" in the war including taking a horrific head wound. On arrival at the hospital, he overheard the doctor say that he was going to die. Still obviously haunted by the war, he undertook this project in part as a memorial to his friends, Sean Flynn (the son of Earl, the movie actor) and Dana Stone, who were captured and executed by the Khmer Rouge.

Robert Capa, whose most famous picture was taken during the Spanish Civil War, showing the moment of death of a republican soldier, died by stepping on a land mine, two weeks after the fall of Dien Bien Phu. Larry Burrows was one of the most famous who covered the American war period, and he died in a helicopter crash in 1971 during the Vietnamese offensive against the Ho Chi Minh Trail. There was Francois Sully and Kyoichi Sawada. So many of those that covered the war were not American. All so important for this collection are the Vietnamese photographers such as Luong Nghia Dung and Vo Van Quy, filming those "on the other side."

How many of the photographs deserve the epithet "haunting." At least half. There is Sou Vichith's photo of three captured Khmer "kids" really, two of them women, who will be raped and executed. There is the badly wounded Cambodian boy looking at his dead mother by Tea Kim Heang. Perhaps it is the no one at all, the empty road, being reclaimed by the jungle, with only part of a human spine on it by Taizo Ichinose that captures best the auto-genocide that was the "rule" of the Khmer Rouge.
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