£14.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £0.56
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Reporting Conflict (Journalism) Paperback – 5 Jul 2012


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.99
£8.37 £3.03


Trade In this Item for up to £0.56
Trade in Reporting Conflict (Journalism) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.56, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (5 July 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230274463
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230274464
  • Product Dimensions: 14.2 x 1 x 21.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 771,428 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

James Rodgers is an author and journalist. During his BBC career (1995-2010), he completed postings in Moscow, Brussels, and Gaza where, from 2002-2004, he was the only international correspondent based in the territory. His numerous other assignments included New York and Washington following the September 11th attacks; reporting from Iraq in 2003 and 2004 during the United States-led invasion; and covering the wars in Chechnya. James teaches journalism at City University London.
You can read more about him and his work at reportingconflict.com.


Product Description

Review

'[The book is] an ideal starting place for students coming to journalism either at BA level or, with knowledge and experience from earlier study or work, at MA level. But it is also going to be valuable for academics and researchers in other fields (notably politics and international relations) whose subject areas are the focus of conflict reporting but who don't know how it works...the author has succeeded in the world of journalism and can now apply a wide-ranging knowledge drawn from experience and measure it alongside academic study.' - Keith Somerville, africajournalismtheworld.com
 
Listen to an interview with author James Rodgers here: bit.ly/THiNMo

Book Description

Reporting Conflict offers an illuminating insight into the way in which reporters gather and prepare their material

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By vivmarshuk on 16 Aug 2012
Format: Paperback
Essential reading, not only for students of journalism but for anyone who's interested in how news of conflicts is covered. James Rodgers has drawn upon his considerable experience as a BBC correspondent to produce a clearly-argued and highly readable account of the dilemmas and pitfalls of reporting on wars. His views on achieving balance are particularly thought-provoking, as is his discussion of the place of the war correspondent in the age of social media and citizen journalism.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Howse on 20 July 2012
Format: Paperback
I've worked with James in the Middle East and in London, and some of the case studies he uses are familiar to me. I found the book to be a great read, and finished it at one sitting. It contains very valuable insights into the craft and challenges of conflict journalism and should be required reading for anyone seeking a better understanding of the subject.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Susan Ann Lead on 9 July 2012
Format: Paperback
Well done james all those years of praxis in the field put into a useful book
Hackademia rules
John mair
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 20 Feb 2013
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent and insightful book on wartime journalism. It is particularly good when James is relating his own experiences.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By ks on 6 Aug 2012
Format: Paperback
As James Rodgers cites in his insightful and compelling examination of the reporting of violent conflict, journalism is often seen as the rough first draft of history (p.6). It is the way many millions around the world learn about their world and about the conflicts that both plague and shape it. What we know about the conflict in the eastern Congo or in Somalia or Syria we know through the reporting of correspondents on the scene or as near as possible or through the analysis of politicians and experts mediated through the prism of journalistic reporting.

This makes an understanding of how journalists report conflict key to the ability of people to ingest and themselves analyse what they are being told. Can they trust this or that journalist, newspaper or radio/TV station; where did they get that piece of video footage, that comment from an eye-witness, who produced that piece of social media; how have they represented the different parties to the conflict, the institutions, NGOs or politicians involved? These are all questions that need to be asked when reading, listening to or watching journalists' accounts of events and are particuarly key when it comes to distant armed conflicts.

Rodgers's book deals with all these issues from both the viewpoint of one who has been there, done that and done it commendably well as a BBC reporter, and from the viewpoint of one who knows and understands the academic literature on journalism and war. It is an ideal starting place for students coming to journalism either at BA level or, with knowledge and experience from earlier study or work, at MA level. But it is also going to be valuable for academics and researchers in other fields (notably politics and international relations) whose subject areas are the focus of conflict reporting but who don't know how it works. (see ,longer review on [...])
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback