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I Remember Korea: Veterans Tell Their Stories of the Korean War, 1950-53 Hardcover – 17 Nov 2003


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 136 pages
  • Publisher: Clarion Books (17 Nov. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 061817740X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0618177400
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 2.2 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,757,052 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Snow on 13 Jan. 2010
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book as a gift for my Dad,( a Korean war veteran) as over the last few years,his interest in the conflict has reawakened.Most books are dry,factual text book types and it was great to find a book with first hand accounts by those who were actually there.The only (slight)disappointment was that the accounts were those of USA servicemen and not British but my dad thoroughly enjoyed reading it.
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Format: Hardcover
A book of true accounts, how the men felt and the atrocities they had to face.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
The decency that lurks in all of us -- even in war 22 Feb. 2004
By Theodore A. Rushton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
If Napoleonic warfare shattered concepts deeply rooted in the past century, this fact does not inavlidate reasons for studying warfare as waged in that earlier era, Col. Thomas E. Griess, of US Military Academy, wrote in July 1969.
Griess, head of the Department of History at West Point, wrote the foreward to "The Art of War in the 17th and 18th Centuries" which analyses the tactics of King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden, the "Lion of the North" in the Thirty Years War. Linda Granfield, in "I Remember Korea" about the 1950-53 Korean War, is a "historian in arms" fit for the company of any other military writer. Her book is a gem.
In contrast to the mob armies of his time, the army of King Adolphus was carefully trained, thoughtfully administered, well equipped, splendidly led. In contrast to the mob army the US sent to Vietnam, "The Art of War . . ." is a blueprint for the awesome military machine the US created after its defeat in Vietnam. The quality of American men-at-arms hasn't changed; but there is a vast improvement in leadership.
Granfield presents us with 31 poignant and telling snapshots of those who served in Korea, drawn from the experiences of the veterans of that war which ended 50 years ago. It is a reminder of the basic good nature, generosity and compassion of Americans and Canadians in the military as well as civilian life. One element of military history covers the Captains and Kings, which is part of training leaders; Granfield writes of the ordinary folks who are commanded by Captains and Kings, which is also part of training effective leaders.
Instead of writing like Napoleon, Granfield writes like Abraham Lincoln who believed, "God must love the common people, because he made so many of them." Today, any officer who doesn't respect and learn from the sergeants has zero future in the military; Granfield presents example after example of those fine qualities of the "common people."
She doesn't analyse the tactics and strategies and advances and retreats and blunders and triumphs of the war, the favorite pastime of armchair generals and obsession of real generals. Instead, her inclusion of stories such as "Lima Beans? No, thanks!" ought to be required reading for anyone and everyone, political or military, who wants to command. She has a superb sense of what matters to real people.
Unfortunately, some people may classify this as a "children's book" because of its straightforward style and concise clarity. If so, we should all be children. It's not a book to be read by freshmen at the Royal Military College in Kingston or West Point, they're still too young for it; instead, it should be assigned reading for the Senior Class with the admonition, "This is the type of people you want to command; now, as an assignment, find someone about whom you can write a story that matches Granfield."
It would be part of a useful graduation exam. If an officer-to-be cannot find a story to match these memories of a grim experience, are they really capable of seeking the best in commanding others?
As for the rest of us . . . . . it is a reminder of the decency that lurks in everyone, even under the rigors of war. She has written a gem.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Some unforgettable memories of a 'forgotten' war 22 Feb. 2004
By Theodore A. Rushton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
If Napoleonic warfare shattered concepts deeply rooted in the past century, this fact does not inavlidate reasons for studying
warfare as waged in that earlier era, Col. Thomas E. Griess, of US Military Academy, wrote in July 1969.
Griess, head of the Department of History at West Point, wrote the foreward to "The Art of War in the 17th and 18th
Centuries" which analyses the tactics of King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden, the "Lion of the North" in the Thirty Years War.
Linda Granfield, in "I Remember Korea" about the 1950-53 Korean War, is a "historian in arms" fit for the company of any
other military writer. Her book is a gem.
In contrast to the mob armies of his time, the army of King Adolphus was carefully trained, thoughtfully administered, well
equipped, splendidly led. In contrast to the mob army the US sent to Vietnam, "The Art of War . . ." is a blueprint for the
awesome military machine the US created after its defeat in Vietnam. The quality of American men-at-arms hasn't changed;
but there is a vast improvement in leadership.
Granfield presents us with 31 poignant and telling snapshots of those who served in Korea, drawn from the experiences of the
veterans of that war which ended 50 years ago. It is a reminder of the basic good nature, generosity and compassion of
Americans and Canadians in the military as well as civilian life. One element of military history covers the Captains and Kings,
which is part of training leaders; Granfield writes of the ordinary folks who are commanded by Captains and Kings, which is
also part of training effective leaders.
Instead of writing like Napoleon, Granfield writes like Abraham Lincoln who believed, "God must love the common people,
because he made so many of them." Today, any officer who doesn't respect and learn from the sergeants has zero future in the
military; Granfield presents example after example of those fine qualities of the "common people."
She doesn't analyse the tactics and strategies and advances and retreats and blunders and triumphs of the war, the favorite
pastime of armchair generals and obsession of real generals. Instead, her inclusion of stories such as "Lima Beans? No,
thanks!" ought to be required reading for anyone and everyone, political or military, who wants to command. She has a superb
sense of what matters to real people.
Unfortunately, some people may classify this as a "children's book" because of its straightforward style and concise clarity. If
so, we should all be children. It's not a book to be read by freshmen at the Royal Military College in Kingston or West Point,
they're still too young for it; instead, it should be assigned reading for the Senior Class with the admonition, "This is the type of
people you want to command; now, as an assignment, find someone about whom you can write a story that matches
Granfield."
It would be part of a useful graduation exam. If an officer-to-be cannot find a story to match these memories of a grim
experience, are they really capable of seeking the best in commanding others?
As for the rest of us . . . . . it is a reminder of the decency that lurks in everyone, even under the rigors of war. She has written
a gem.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
OK if you like reading letters sent back home 29 Jan. 2007
By Richard Fuller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
You may like this book if you're looking for a more personal side of the Korean conflict. The book consists of very short snippets (one or two pages) of the people who severed and may include a letter back home. The letters are very vague in nature, typical to the era. "Lost my buddy yesterday, things looking better today . . ." sort of thing but don't expect any details or circumstances.
0 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Korean War stories were boring 10 Nov. 2006
By Greg Furey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Stuff like this is better to watch on YouTube. I was not really interested in stories about people that did not do much in Korea. What was the point of telling me you were mainly bored?
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