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Later Reformation in England 1547-1603 (British History in Perspective) [Paperback]

Diarmaid MacCulloch
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: 19.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

20 Dec 2000 0333921399 978-0333921395 2
The English Reformation was the event which chiefly shaped English identity well into the twentieth century. It made the English kingdom a self-consciously Protestant state dominating the British Isles, and boasting an established Church which eventually developed a peculiar religious agenda, Anglicanism. Although Henry VIII triggered a break with the Pope in his eccentric quest to rid himself of an inconveniently loyal wife, the Reformation soon slipped from his control, and in the reigns of his Tudor successors, it developed a momentum which made it one of the success stories of European Protestantism. In this book, MacCulloch discusses the developing Reformation in England through the later Tudor reigns: Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I. He provides a narrative of events, then discusses the ideas which shaped the English Reformation, and surveys the ways in which the English reacted to it, how far and quickly they accepted it and assesses those who remained dissenters. This new edition is fully updated to take account of new material in the field that has appeared in the last decade.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2 edition (20 Dec 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0333921399
  • ISBN-13: 978-0333921395
  • Product Dimensions: 22 x 14 x 1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 647,569 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

'This second edition of The Later Reformation in England, 1547-1603 brings new refinements and nuances, mostly from his own research, but still a supplemented and polished version of the first version. On those grounds alone this edition is a considerable contribution to ongoing research.' - Barry Collett, University of Melbourne, Paregon

'An excellent textbook - best out on religious history of England in its period.' - Ronald Hutton, University of Bristol

'The new edition...is simply the best introduction to the latter part of the English Reformation in print.' - Malcolm Yarnell, Anglican and Episcopal History

'The Later Reformation, and invaluable short guide to a turbulent age, shows how easily great ideas go adrift and how Protestant England disappeard in disappointment and confusion.' - Dom Aidan Bellenger, The Downside Review

About the Author

DIARMAID MACCULLOCH is a Fellow of St Cross College, Oxford and Professor of the History of the Church at Oxford University. He has published widely in Tudor and Reformation history. His book Thomas Cranmer: A Life (1996) won the Whitbread Biography Prize, the James Tait Black Prize and the Duff Cooper Prize.

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Enigma that became Anglicanism 27 Mar 2011
Format:Paperback
This little book is filled with the most recent scholarship on the English Reformation. MacCulloch's thesis is that the Reformation that was underway under the reign of Edward VI was cut short by his death. Thus the developments of 1550 (Hooper's refusal to wear vestments) and 1552 (Cranmer's revised Book of Common Prayer)were as far as the English Ref was going to go. The Ref in England experienced "arrested development." Farther than that Elizabeth would not go. Thus all the Evangelical/Puritan/Presbyterian efforts of those who had been schooled under Calvin in Geneva or in Frankfurt during Mary Tudor's brief reign were thwarted as they attempted to take the Reformation further along continental lines desiring to make England as Reformed as Zurich or Geneva. Due to Elizabeth's resistance to further ecclessial innovation, reformation or renovation the English church remained an odd mixture of early continental Reformed thought encapsulated in the Thirty-Nine Articles, the somewhat more catholic sounding Book of Common Prayer of 1559, which was more "catholic" than Cranmer's 1552 version, and the simultanteous retention of a medieval Catholic church structure constituted of bishops, dioceses and parishes. The Elizabethan Settlement of 1559 satisfied almost no one initially, but brutal suppression of Roman sympathizers on the one hand and radical Puritans on the other brought about religious stability by the 1580s. The Elizabethan Church was a large tent where men and women of conflicting religous passions could worship in the same church. According to MacCulloch Anglicanism as we know it did not come into being until Richard Hooker enunciated its ethos in his "Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity" quite late in Elizabeth's reign. Read more ›
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Enigma that became Anglicanism 23 Dec 2008
By Quentin D. Stewart - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This little book is filled with the most recent scholarship on the English Reformation. MacCulloch's thesis is that the Reformation that was underway under the reign of Edward VI was cut short by his death. Thus the developments of 1550 (Hooper's refusal to wear vestments) and 1552 (Cranmer's revised Book of Common Prayer)were as far as the English Ref was going to go. The Ref in England experienced "arrested development." Farther than that Elizabeth would not go. Thus all the Evangelical/Puritan/Presbyterian efforts of those who had been schooled under Calvin in Geneva or in Frankfurt during Mary Tudor's brief reign were thwarted as they attempted to take the Reformation further along continental lines desiring to make England look like Zurich or Geneva. The English church remained an odd mixture of early continental Reformed thought encapsulated in the Thirty-Nine Articles and the Book of Common Prayer of 1559 while simultaneously retaining a medieval Catholic structure of bishops, dioceses and parishes. The Elizabethan Settlement of 1559 satisfied almost no one initially, but brutal suppression of Roman sympathizers and radical Puritans alike brought about religious stability by the 1580s. The Elizabethan Church was a large tent where men and women of conflicting religous passions could worship in the same church. According to MacCulloch Anglicanism as we know it did not come into being until Richard Hooker enunciated its ethos in his Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity late in Elizabeth's reign. In the 1590s these men who conformed to the Elizabethan Settlement began to envision a type of Anglicanism that would briefly flower under the reign of Charles I with disastrous consequences. With the Restoration of 1660 the enigma known as Anglicanism never dared to define itself clearly as either Protestant or Catholic and thus made necessity a virtue.
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