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Reflektor
 
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Reflektor

28 Oct. 2013 | Format: MP3

£8.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £17.03 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
7:32
30
2
5:43
30
3
2:42
30
4
6:30
30
5
4:21
30
6
3:58
30
7
5:24
Disc 2
30
1
2:51
30
2
6:13
30
3
6:42
30
4
6:02
30
5
5:52
30
6
11:16
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 2013
  • Release Date: 1 Jan. 2013
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Universal Music Group International
  • Copyright: (C) 2013 Arcade Fire Music, LLC
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:15:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00G4XT602
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (198 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 856 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 56 people found the following review helpful By orac101 on 6 Nov. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Arcade Fire? Just a band...and a hugely over hyped one at that which might go some way to explaining why this 'abstract' and 'difficult' 4th album has divided hard core fans and rock dullard music journalists.

My own personal hero worship of Arcade was a brief two year fling between 2005 and 2007 that ended once I had overplayed the rather brilliant 'Neon Bible' with its gorgeous deluxe CD boxset. By the time that 'The Suburbs' came along, I had totally lost interest, skipped that particularly album despite all the praise and nonsense written about it until a week or so again when 'Reflecktor' blasted out of the radio and lifted a sterile playlist full of Top 40 twerking junk.
Was this really Arcade Fire with a pulsating Giorgio Moroder bassline, deliciously offbeat vocal interplay within a indie disco stomper that was subversively altering the airwaves of Planet Pop? The title track was worthy of further investigation and after one play of both volumes, I was hooked once again by this curious Canadian band and giving the entire album another listen, followed by another listen.

The first thing that struck me about this album as a whole was its wonderful diversity - each track is so different and so brilliantly bonkers how they all build then wrong foot the listener with a nifty chord change or a curve ball in the form of a frantic finish within a clash of ideas. It is this unique brilliance across both volumes that inspires wonder with each play. LCD's James Murphy certainly adds something new and exciting to Arcade's already rich pallet of sounds but his input has been massively overstated by those who have rubbished the album.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Red on Black TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 Oct. 2013
Format: Audio CD
Anyone approaching this album will already be struck by the mixed press it has received. Pitchfork call it "An Event--an album that dares to be great, and remarkably succeeds". On the other hand Drowned in Sound ruefully reflects that here we see "a potential candidate for album of the year wither away into the dust of disappointment". The weight of expectation around "Reflektor" has been enormous. Arcade Fire are one of the best things to happen to rock music and with every anticipatory fibre in your being you want them to succeed. A double album of their music produced by LCD Soundsystem retired genius James Murphy? What a prospect, the Gods of music must have conspired to produce such a great pairing. Sadly the reality does not live up to the billing.

1. It is too long - there are a limited number of genuinely worthwhile studio doubles that stand the test of time. "Blonde on Blonde", "London Calling", "Something/Anything", "Physical Graffiti", "Sign of the times" and "the White Album" (although George Martin thought it would make a better single LP) spring to mind. Others fall into a different category that the production of a much tighter single album would have been the better course of action. Think "The Wall", "Speakerboxx/The Love Below", "The River", "1999". "Layla" and "Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness". As it stands "Reflektor" feels like an album that falls in the the latter camp not the former.

2. The question of filler - The issue of the 10 minute "Hidden Track" on this album is the most obvious example of studio nonsense that Murphy and the Butlers should have left on the cutting floor.
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By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 28 Oct. 2013
Format: Audio CD
Reflektor is the fourth studio album by Canadian indie rock band Arcade Fire.

It was tricky enough following up the seminal debut Funeral; this remains their best work to date. However Neon Bible and The Suburbs were still sublime.

The new album is another turn in a different direction. Notably co-produced by James Murphy (LCD Soundsystem), Reflektor takes on a funky electronic façade. Epicly spread over two CDs there is an hour and a half of new material for devoted fans to get their teeth into which is instantly quite demanding. Much like their previous works, the album improves with additional listens. But the ingenuity in some of the tracks is weighed down by their excessive length, a stark contrast to the precision of tracks such as 'Laika' from Funeral (3 minutes and a half) - compare this to some of the tracks on this album that clock in at 6 or 7 minutes and you begin to wonder whether the band could have been a little more cunning.

It's a fresh and ambitious record that requires time and patience but is perhaps a little too grandiose and less refined than their older work.

Listen to: Reflektor, Flashbulb Eyes, Awful Sound (Oh Eurydice)
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Format: Audio CD
I came to this album late having been a bit disappointed by 'The Suburbs',and thinking maybe the band had burned themselves out with their earlier brilliance. What a joy then to find that they return here to their brilliant best - indeed,in terms of consistency on any of their albums,maybe this IS their best to date. 'Reflektor' includes a number of energetic,anthemic tracks that will instantly join fans' lists of live favourites,but there is also here plenty of invention and originality and that particularly Canadian brand of kookiness that Arcade Fire so excel at. A dazzling joy of an album,to be listened to LOUD (and on a good quality sound system!)
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