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Redshirts (Hugo Award Winner - Best Novel) Hardcover – 5 Jun 2012

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (5 Jun. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765316994
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765316998
  • Product Dimensions: 15.1 x 3 x 21.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 358,955 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

John Scalzi won the 2006 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and his debut novel Old Man's War was a finalist for the Hugo Award. His other novels include The Ghost Brigades, The Last Colony, and The Android's Dream. He lives in southern Ohio with his wife and daughter.


Product Description

Book Description

They were expendable . . . until they started comparing notes! This is a must-read novel for all fans of smart, witty SF. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

Ensign Andrew Dahl has just been assigned to the flagship Universal Union Capital Ship Intrepid It's a prestige posting, and life couldn't be better . . . until Andrew begins to pick up on the fact that:

- Every Away Mission involves some kind of lethal confrontation with alien forces.

- The ship's captain, its chief science officer and the handsome Lieutenant Kerensky always survive these confrontations.

- At least one low-ranked crew member is, sadly, always killed.

Not surprisingly, a great deal of energy below decks is expended on avoiding, at all costs, being assigned to an Away Mission. Then Andrew stumbles on information that completely transforms his and his colleagues' understanding of what the starship Intrepid really is . . . and offers them a crazy, high-risk chance to save their own lives.


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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By dirkfeelgood on 16 July 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I had high hopes for this book, having seen it was on a few 'Best of..' lists. Certainly the premise appealed to me as a fan of Sci-Fi shows and Star Trek in particular. Sadly it was a poor book. It is written almost entirely in dialogue, with each speech bubble being followed by a 'said SO-AND-SO.' After a while that gets really irritating.

'Shall we go down here' said Bill
'Let's' said Tom
'I don't know what we'll find' said Bill
'Neither do I' said Tom.

Also I found the characters to be poorly developed. They were all a bit snarky with no real defining features beyond perhaps their sex. (the female character being the only one really to have her sexuality brought into it).

I almost didn't finish it but decided in the end to push on through. It wasn't worth it.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By D. Harris TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Jun. 2012
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book, not having read much of Scalzi's previous work, mainly for its intriguing premise. What if, several centuries in the future, in a universe somewhat like that of "Star Trek" - starships, a galactic federation, aliens, diplomacy, space battles - the junior crew (and in particular, Ensign Andy Dahl) on one of those ships start to ask awkward questions - questions about why there are so many pointless, contrived and unlikely deaths among their ranks?

The title alone seemed to promise an amusing read, enlivened by geeky in-references. If you're interested in the book you'll probably know where the title comes from - but if you don't, the "redshirts" were the expendable security personnel in the original "Star Trek", a couple of whom would invariably accompany Kirk and Spock on hazardous missions and almost invariably get killed). Terry Pratchett said, I think, something about the minions in fantasy novels who would come running in response to the call of "Guards! Guards!" deserving a book of their own - well, here is the Sf equivalent.

In fact, this is much more than an amusing read. I don't want to say too much about what happens, for fear of spoiling the story, but as well as having fun exploring his central concept, Scalzi manges to pose a number of questions about what is real and what isn't, free will, an author's responsibility to his or her characters, and what are the hallmarks of good (and bad0 SF writing (and perhaps, writing in general). And he writes a good, page turning story as well - this isn't just a parody, or a dramatisation of tvtropes.org.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. G. Chisholm TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 Jun. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Scalzi has written some great sci-fi such as Old Man's War, however he has misfired a little on this curious mix of parody, comedy and pathos.

Essentially we have a crew of a space ship who have come to realise that they always end up getting offed whilst the senior officers lead a charmed life. Just like Star Trek whom Scalzi has some clearly disparaging ideas about. The thread of the story is the bit part players trying to work out why this is happening and to somehow stop it. I won't say too much more or it will give the game away.

What somewhat spoils this is the fact that to start with Scalzi is writing a comedy, then it turns into a parody eventually becoming a little confusing and a lot serious. It's a bit like the newer Terry Pratchett stories where the initial part of the book is good fun but tapers off towards the end. I just wish that if a book starts off this way it would continue rather than becoming ever more schizophrenic.

Effectively we have a mix of Star Trek and Galaxy Quest with some of Jasper Fford's Thursday Next chucked in for good measure. It's not all bad but it could have been great.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Clever Spud TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 May 2013
Format: Paperback
The main story is a light, predictable, Science Fiction romp with Scalzi's trade-mark wise-cracking characters who all fill a role but otherwise act and speak with identical voices. His characters' lack of identity is his major failing as a writer. It isn't even a spoiler to say that the central premise of the main part of the book is "Hey, isn't it just like we're on TV". He takes that and runs with it in predictable, neatly summed-up fashion. It's mildly amusing throughout but the dialogue is like listening to a room full of old men wise-cracking before climbing into a barber's chair. The sort of thing that passes through the head of the nondescript guy standing at the other end of the bar in a Damon Runyon tale. It is wearying but tolerable over the course of the story.

The second, almost, half of the book is made up of a series of fairly strange, serious, philosophical reflections, near essays, on choices, consequences, inevitability and obligation. It isn't what I was expecting and I neither enjoyed or benefited from it.

To be honest I haven't really enjoyed Scalzi's work in the last few years but I keep giving it a shot. This is far from the worst book out there and worth a borrow if you're a Star Trek fan, but I wouldn't recommend it if you're after something truly original or interesting. His first couple of Old Man's War books are far better in that regard. If you're after wise-cracking SF then you'd do a lot worse than re-visiting the classic Stainless Steel Rat stories of the late-lamented Harry Harrison.

3.5 out of 5.
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