Red Tory and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Red Tory: How Left and Ri... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Greener_Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: **SHIPPED FROM UK** We believe you will be completely satisfied with our quick and reliable service. All orders are dispatched as swiftly as possible! Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Red Tory: How Left and Right have Broken Britain and How we can Fix It Paperback – 2 Apr 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.99
£5.27 £0.01
£14.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Red Tory: How Left and Right have Broken Britain and How we can Fix It + The Big Society + The Big Society Debate: A New Agenda for Social Policy?
Price For All Three: £44.94

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (2 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571251676
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571251674
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2.4 x 20.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 255,485 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'An essential pre-election read.' --GQ Magazine

'Such is the bland predictability of British politics, the territory of managerialised soundbite, that the appetite continues for Blond's intellectual equivalent of a firework display.' --Madeleine Bunting, Guardian

'His thesis makes a potent read as he tracks the history of our modern complacent society, its will crushed between markets and state. It makes sense of Cameron's mantra that there is such a thing as society, it's just not the same as the state.' --Benedict Brogan, Daily Telegraph

Book Description

In Red Tory: How Left and Right have Broken Britain and How we can Fix It, Phillip Blond outlines a radical political vision, challenges the conventions of both Left wing and Right wing politicians and overturns the long-held economic consensus of the British Establishment.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. Goddard on 22 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback
It's a pity, this book. There are some useful ideas about economics, politics and society here but there is also a lot wrong with it. I was a little puzzled, before the last General Election, at David Cameron's rabid enthusiasm for the 'Big Society'. I thought some of the ideas were interesting but it all sounded terribly half-baked and naive. Now I know why. It's a shame, because I sympathise with some of Blond's points. His criticisms of the role of the State and of markets in our lives are, in places, cogent and worthwhile. So much of the rest of it, though, left me bewildered at how Blond has achieved the high profile that he has. He must be cruising some kind of chattering-class zeitgeist. That seems to be enough, these days, to generate oodles of media and political interest. The quality of the analysis and ideas appears to be secondary. Was it always like this?

First of all, let no one be deceived by the 'Red Tory' title. This is as Tory an analysis of the working classes and their position as you will get. It's an older Toryism, to be sure, but you can see where his heart lies by considering the following:

1) in a book of 292 pages he devotes one line to the subject of the National Minimum Wage. This measure did a lot to lift some of the poorest workers into a better and more dignified position (and was relentlessly opposed by the Conservatives). If he really wanted to do something to improve incentives to work for benefit claimants then he and Ian Duncan-Smith would advocate the obvious; a significant increase in the National Minimum Wage. His alternatives for increasing the capital of the poor are no substitute, though worth exploring in themselves.

2) Blond never analyses behaviour change amongst the middle and upper classes.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Dan Roper on 25 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is something of a curates egg of a book. The central idea of increasing social capital is not new but is interesting to explore from a Tory perspective. Particular strengths in the book are a Tory critique of Thatcherism and exploration of an earlier Tory tradition in the form of the Primrose League. Shortcomings of Labour in power and the background to the banking crisis are well covered.

The main weakness in the book is a tendency to express what are quite straightforward ideas in over complicated language and to launch into somewhat pompous diatribes. In addition, the chapter on liberalism is particularly weak jumping between the 19th century, 1960s and present day giving no credit for any of the concepts or ideas evolving over this time. In addition, liberalism and socialism get lumped together and barely distinguished.

The book concludes with a call for a strong but smaller state and conservatism with a social conscience. By happy coincidence this leads to an endorsement of David Cameron.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Ashtar Command on 15 Mar. 2015
Format: Paperback
“Red Tory” is a book by Phillip Blond, an Anglican theologian of the Radical Orthodox variety. This particular work doesn't deal with religion, however, but with British politics. Blond heads a conservative think tank called ResPublica, which at least previously supported British Prime Minister David Cameron.

The odd designation Red Tory stands for a (supposed) combination of social egalitarianism and anti-capitalism on the one hand, and traditional moral values on the other. The claim that Blond stands for egalitarianism is something of a stretch, since he explicitly sees Benjamin Disraeli, the Primrose League and various High Tories such as John Ruskin as his ideological forebears. Less visible, but always lurking in the background, is the Distributism of “Chesterbelloc”. Now, Hilaire Belloc wasn't what anyone would call an egalitarian! Indeed, Blond explicitly says in “Red Tory” that society needs a hierarchy based on virtue, and opposes high taxes on inheritance, making it possible for property-owners to pass on their property through the family line. He even says that such people need certain privileges…

That being said, “Red Tory” is nevertheless an interesting read, since Blond attempts – with varied degrees of success, to be sure – to apply a Distributist and communitarian form of conservatism to contemporary British conditions. Being equally critical of both the welfare state and the neo-liberal market (which, paradoxically, also breeds a strong state), Blond proposes to remake Britain in a more Distributist image by decentralization, the scrapping of repressive laws, a public sector controlled by the employees and users, more employee-owned businesses (“John Lewis” is his favorite), and various government-sponsored schemes to increase the savings of the poor.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By droyj on 24 Sept. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It promised to be a good read. The qualitative analysis was very interesting but the quantitative statistics were too lengthy and frankly for me boring. It turnred out overall to be " In praise of David Cameron" perhaps in view of the arguments employed justifiable. The conflicts with Thatcherism were mentioned but not really explored. One thong is more than apparent we have no Radical People's party. On the back of it all UKIP may prove to be attractive for the right wingers who extol the Thatcher administration or who are afraid to offer criticism.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback