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Audible Sample

Red Rising Audio Download – Unabridged

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Audio Download, Unabridged, 7 Aug 2014
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Product Description

Earth is dying. Thousands of workers, who live in the vast caves beneath Mars, mine the precious elements that will make the planet habitable. They are Earth's only hope. Until the day Darrow learns that it's a lie. Mars has been habitable - and inhabited - for generations. Darrow disguises himself and infiltrates their society, intent on taking them down. But the surface is a battlefield - and Darrow isn't the only one with an agenda.

©2013 Pierce Brown (P)2014 Recorded Books LLC

Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 16 hours and 10 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Avid Audio
  • Release Date: 7 Aug. 2014
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00LO0PUK0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. Harris TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Dec. 2014
Format: Paperback
I somehow managed to miss this book despite it getting lots of praise when it appeared earlier this year, but finally picked it up in anticipation of the sequel which is due early in 2015.

At first, I wondered what all the fuss was about. While the setting - a pitiless, hierarchical society that keeps its most downtrodden, the "reds", slaving in the mines of Mars - is well drawn, it didn't seem anything special. Then Brown did... something... and the book seemed to rise to a whole new level.

Darrow, the main protagonist, is one of the reds, who toil in atrocious conditions to produce the minerals that are needed to make Mars habitable. If they strain every muscle and meet their quote, they may get a little more food to share, a few more comforts, and Darrow shows himself bold - almost reckless - in straining to achieve this.

It's all a con, of course, and we pretty soon see that things are rigged to set the miners against each other and keep the elite - the "golds" on top at all times. So Darrow turns rebel, at terrible cost, and sets himself against the hierarchy. The rest of the book is then a thrilling description of how, in the "Institute" he is forced to play deadly power games with the sons and daughters of the elite in order to rise and win the power that will - perhaps - one day be used to free his people.

The story of what happens in those games is, again, a lesson in power and a lesson in division: I don't want to give too much away to anyone who hasn't read this yet but we see - as one might expect - that the structure of the mines is repeated at all levels, with friend set against friend, brother against brother (and sister).
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Pablo Cheesecake (The Eloquent Page) TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 28 Jan. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Pierce Brown has created a stark vision of the future in Red Rising, his debut novel. Mars, and other inhabited worlds throughout our galaxy, is ruled by an elite class who have spent many hundreds of years creating a rigid culture where everyone is born, lives and dies in a predefined role. At the top are the Golds, the genetic crème de la crème, virtual living gods and the embodiment of perfection. Far below, on the bottom rung of the ladder, are the lowly Reds. They are the downtrodden masses, the miners and menial workers, largely ignorant of the huge lie that underpins their existence.

The Reds are viewed by most as little more than beasts of burden. From their ranks comes Darrow, a young man given the chance to rise above his station and try to right the wrongs that exist everywhere. A traumatic event in Darrow’s life opens his eyes to the larger world and a secret society tasks him with infiltrating the Golds as a 5th columnist. His goal? To bring down their rule from within. The hate that radiates from Darrow, and drives him to take on this likely suicidal mission, is palpable. In all honesty, knowing the reasons for his hate, I can’t say that I blame him. The Reds are being exploited at every turn and Darrow witnesses that exploitation at the most personal level. His rage is the fuel that fires his journey. There is an interesting evolution in his character as the plot unfolds. He experiences the slowly growing realization that it’s not just the Reds who are suffering. Irrespective of the colour caste someone is born into, they are as much a prisoner to their role as the Reds are. Darrow comes to appreciate the inequality that exists everywhere from the bottom right to the very top.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bex TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 24 Sept. 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"You and I are Gold. We are the end of the evolutionary line. We tower above the flesh heap of man, shepherding the lesser colours. You have inherited this legacy."

I read the first two pages of this book and I already knew I would love it; it's one of those where you just know immediately and you can sigh with relief. I'm so pleased it was because I haven't been this excited about a book in a while - and not for lack of trying! For this reason I apologise now for the incoming essay.

Set on Mars, mostly in an underground mining colony, are the Reds. A colony of people with a job - to dig. Darrow, our fantastically witty male lead, is the youngest driller (known as HellDivers) to have been seen in his colony at the ripe age of 16 (ripe enough in fact to already have been married off as all 16 year old boys are).

Think of colours as social standing. Reds like Darrow are effectively labourers, Greys are soldiers and the Golds are the leaders. Obsidians are the black helmeted killers essentially doing the Golds dirty work. Opposing them are the Sons of Ares, a rebel group intent on destroying the Golds and preventing progression into life on Mars. Because, as you might expect, the leaders take advantage of the "lesser classes" and the Sons of Ares do not support the assumed slavery of the Reds. In this case the Reds are made to drill in order to excavate Helium 3, and this helium 3 is being used to reform Mars so that it is habitable for the "softer colours". There's a big emphasis on how brave and noble Reds are to sacrifice themselves to make a better place for other colours, and most of the Reds don't feel too put out by it, including Darrow. But I'm sure you've figured out this self sacrificing behaviour was not a choice.
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