Buy Used
£2.48
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by tunesonline
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: CDs, DVDs, Videogames, LPs & more! Fast shipping! All items guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Red [DVD] [1995] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.7 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

7 used from £2.47

Special Offers and Product Promotions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00008976W
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 410,502 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Mar. 2006
Format: DVD
Despite being the finale of the critically acclaimed "Colors" trilogy, "Red" ("Rouge") need not be seen after the similarly beloved "Blue" ("Bleu") and "White" ("Blanc"). As warm and rich as the shades of red scattered through it, this film is one of the most compelling non-American releases in years.
On her way home from a modelling session, Valentine (Irene Jacob) accidently runs over and injures a pregnant dog. The owner is Joseph Kern, (Jean-Louis Trintignant) an embittered, cynical ex-judge whose years of condemnation and acquittal have left him spiritually adrift. He now spends his time alone in his house, wiretapping the phones of his neighbors and predicting what will happen in their lives.
After Valentine expresses disgust at Joseph's activities, he turns himself in to the authorities. Their friendship grows into a bond of differing values and unhappy histories. As Valentine prepares to leave for England, the judge reveals the tragic circumstances of his early life -- a tragedy mirrored by some of the people he has been spying on.
Where "Blue" was cool and sensual and "White" was sharp and sexy, "Red" has a sweetness and richness to its story. Valentine's name suggests love, and that love -- a platonic friendship that teeters on romantic love -- brings Joseph back from his unhealthy cynicism. Her kindness and unhappiness appeal to him, reassuring him that people are not intrinsically bad. His spiritual transformation is subtle, but convincing; it's mirrored by the sun shining down on him near the film's end.
Few filmmakers could pull off the symbolism that springs up in any of the "Colors" movies. In this one, red springs up everywhere -- walls, glasses, jeeps, lipstick, clothing, phones, bowling balls, little lights lining a model runway.
Read more ›
Comment 23 of 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
Those who have seen all three may disagree. If you class the trilogy as one film then I would certainly say it is the best. But if I was allowed to watch only one more film before I die then I would choose Red over the other two. It centres on the relationship between a model and a bitter judge which starts frostily, but by the end of the film has developed into one of deep mutual respect and understanding. It is the manner in which this is achieved however, that marks this film as a cinematic masterpiece. The dialogue and characters are original and fascinating. Set alongside fantastic cinematography and a beautiful score, the whole thing wraps up the theme of brotherhood with breathtaking humanity and skill. A warm, optimistic and intelligent film that everybody should see.
Comment 25 of 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
This culmination of Krzysztof Kieslowski's trilogy of films (loosely based around the French flag tricolor - here, fraternity) is, for me, the finest of the three and ranks as one of most outstanding films of the last few decades. As with all Kieslowski films, Red is visually stunning and contains a fount of brilliant cinematic touches and references. It is a film that stands (for me, requires) repeat viewings, which serve to reveal Red's inner depths, beauty and, indeed, profundity. One of the most amazing things about Red (out of all Kieslowski's films) is its subtlety - if you are used to standard UK multiplex fare, Red provides a suitably antithetic kick in the teeth. Significantly, though, whilst Kieslowski's tale of love, guilt, jealousy, deception, trust, premonition, fate, betrayal, dreams, communication and coincidence mixes a whole host of cinematic directorial styles (and genres), among them Hitchcock, Roeg (Don't Look Now), Mimouni (l'Appartement) and even Polanski (The Tenant), what emerges is something uniquely Kieslowskian (surely a word that has been used before?).

Set in Geneva, Red's narrative follows Swiss student and photographic model Valentine (Irene Jacob), who, whilst suffering romantic uncertainty (her boyfriend being abroad in the UK), runs over the dog of retired judge (Jean-Louis Trintignant), to whom she returns the injured animal. In parallel Kieslowski runs a storyline of Valentine's neighbour Auguste (Jean-Pierre Lorit), who is training for the bar, and is (similarly) having partner problems via his unfaithful girlfriend, Karin (Frederique Feder). Red's narrative is, of course, important to the extent that it brings out the key elements (foibles, largely) of Kieslowski's characters.
Read more ›
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
I like French cinema. I like all things French, but I especially like French cinema. I won't admit to being an expert on it, however. But I will say that I do enjoy it, and I have seen a lot. And this is one of the best French films I have ever seen.
It's not because it's meant to be clever, it's not becaue it's got Irene Jacob in it. It's just because it's nice. That's all. You can tell that Kievslowsky really put his heart into it, and it works. There is a really strong if not really silly dynamic to the main characters' relationship. It's also very innocent as well. I love the judge's little home, and the way you can tell it's been his only refuge for a long time. When you see him in court to face up to his responibility for his... sinsitser actions, you can really get to grips with the changes that the two characters are causing in each others' lives.
The ending is also great, and especially great if you've seen the other two films. You will probably laugh out loud at the obsurdity of it. This is not a boring film if you prepare yourself for it, because a lot of French films rely on characters and plot rather than special effects - unlike Hollywood which relies on special effects rather than plot. I don't know whio it was, but someone once said of French cinema "We make little-budget films with huge stories, and Hollywood makes huge-budget films with little stories."
Oh, just watch it. It's great. I think you'd have to be thinking too hard to not like this film...
Comment 13 of 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions



Feedback