FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Rebels Against The Future... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Dispatched from the US -- Expect delivery in 2-3 weeks. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Trade in your item
Get a £0.75
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Rebels Against The Future: The Luddites And Their War On The Industrial Revolution: Lessons For The Computer Age Paperback – 17 Apr 1996


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 17 Apr 1996
£9.99
£7.01 £0.95
£9.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.

Frequently Bought Together

Rebels Against The Future: The Luddites And Their War On The Industrial Revolution: Lessons For The Computer Age + Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy
Price For Both: £18.54

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.75
Trade in Rebels Against The Future: The Luddites And Their War On The Industrial Revolution: Lessons For The Computer Age for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.75, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; Pbk. Ed edition (17 April 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201407183
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201407181
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.9 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 75,658 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Kirkpatrick Sale is a contributing editor of "The Nation" and the author of many books, including" Conquering Paradise: Christopher Columbus and the Columbian Legacy."

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
IT WAS ABOUT a half hour after midnight on an April Sunday in 1812 that the band of some six score Yokshiremen finally made their way down the rutted lane that led to a place called Rawfolds Mill, a looming multistory building, protected by a gated wall, housing the hated woolen machines of the hated manufacturer William Cartwright. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is both a history book and a still timely polemic. Sale begins by providing a detailed and fascinating insight into a much neglected period in English history, when the ruptures caused by the start of the industrial revolution caused many to rise up against the machines they held responsible for the sudden destruction of their livelihoods, communities, environment, traditions and whole ethical framework. However what really makes the book is the way in which this period of history is embedded in a wider analysis of the first 19th Century industrial revolution and its parallels with the current digital revolution. Sale writes powerfully about our relentless march of industrial, mechanised, digitised 'progress' at almost any cost.

The book was written in the 1990s and this has dated some of the language (e.g. 'information superhighway') and it deserves an updated Preface/ Conclusion to take into account recent developments. With this I'd certainly have given it 5 stars. However ages doesn't diminish the force of the warning, which if anything has become more urgent since and it's testimony to the quality of the book and its thinking that although written at the beginning of the internet era, it remains as potent a critique as ever. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 19 reviews
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
I have a Luddite moment... 12 Feb. 2006
By Jeffrey Dorn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Years ago I was sitting in traffic on the South East Expressway in Boston, MA. I had just spent the better part of the day fixxing automobiles for people. That was my job. That is what I do. Trying to get home so I could "relax" was a chore. I lived maybe 30 min. away from my work but spent better than an hour just sitting in the hot July sun while the conjested traffic inched it's way along slowly, burning precious fossile fuel, spewing carbon & other noxious fumes into the air surrounding Boston. I was not happy. I called my wife on our ancient "Bag Phone". We discussed moving out of the Boston metro region so we could slow down the pace, relax a bit more and just enjoy life.

I had a Luddite moment. I realized then that I was working hard to keep all this technology together just so people could get to their own jobs to earn the money needed to keep their technology working. It dawned on me how futile all this stress and effort are... We are killing ourselves to support technology and all the time fooling ourselves with the idea that this modern life style is somehow better than in the good old days. I did not have an urge to smash any machines but I did want to stop the world and get off. Am I really any happier now than I would be if I were a village blacksmith in 1812? What do I really need to be happy? What does all this wonderful modern technology really cost me in blood, sweat and tears? I cash my paycheck, buy food and fuel, pay my bills, look at the remainder and wonder if that 1812 blacksmith was any worse off, realatively than I am today.

Sales book chronicles a moment in the history of labor struggle. Make of it what you will... He has documented a story that needs to be told if we as a society are to look at the big picture of ourselves and ask... How did We get here? Is this the right direction to be going? Can we survive and sustain this modern lifestyle?

I suggest reading at least chapters 8 and 10. I also suggest reading it along with a UE published book titled "Labors untold story" and Howard Zinns work "Peoples History"

Comfort is a realative thing.
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
An Eloquent, Provocative & Thoughtful Critique ! 16 Jun. 2000
By Barron Laycock - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
"Rebels Against The Future" is a book with an important, relevant, and timely message. Written by Kirkpatrick Sale, a long-time editor of "The Nation", the book describes the historical struggle for human rights against the forces of technological innovation by way of the saga of Ned Ludd & his followers. By detailing this example, the author illustrates how difficult it is, both historically and culturally, for individual workers & ordinary people to successfully come to terms with the anonymous and often overwhelming forces of an intractable and self-propelled technical dynamic; industrial progress.

I first came across this book last year by way of the internet; an excerpt of it was posted on a neo-Luddite site I was browsing through. Reading this short portion hooked me on Mr. Sale's writing style and substance. This is a book ostensibly devoted to the iconoclastic revolt by a small but determined group of nineteenth century English cottage workers against the hurtful introduction of new machines that, in essence, deprived them of an opportunity to make a living and support themselves and their families. It was the first documented account of a group rebelling against the enforced imposition by industrialists of new technology that was contrary to their own social and economic interests. It was not all machinery that the so-called "Luddites" rebelled against; it was only those technological innovations "but all Machinery hurtful to Commonality". He forwards an impressive, multi-faceted argument; each facet of the argument bearing on various aspects of what the author associates with various characteristics of technologies.

Thus, Sale ascribes a "motif industriale" on such technologically-based innovation such that; first, technologies are never neutral, & some are hurtful; second, industrialism is always a cataclysmic process, destroying the past, roiling the present, making the future uncertain; third, only those serving an apprenticeship to nature can be trusted with machines, fourth; the nation-state, synergistically intertwined with industrialism, will always come to its aid and defense, making revolts futile and reform ineffectual; fifth, that resistance to the industrial system, based on moral principles and rooted in some sense of moral revulsion, is not only possible but necessary; sixth, that resistance to industrialism must force not only "the machine question" but the viability of industrial society into public consciousness and debate; seventh, philosophically, resistance to industrialism has to be embedded in an ideology that is morally informed, carefully articulated, and widely shared; and eighth, if industrial civilization does not eventually crumble from determined resistance within its walls, it seems certain to eventually crumble of its own accumulated excesses and instabilities.

Of course, the lessons from the experience of the Luddites are central to the issues of our own time. Everywhere in the burgeoning postindustrial world citizens face the same hurtful, impersonal, dehumanizing, and disenfranchising effects of the rapidly changing technological landscape. The central issue of runaway technological progress is the degree to which it acts without meaningful citizen input to determine the nature of the society it increasingly interrupts, disrupts, and alters through a ceaseless and seemingly unmanaged and undirected dynamic of industrial innovation. There seems to be no human face to this process, and it appears to be unresponsive, insensitive, and totally indifferent to its dehumanizing effect on the millions of individual human beings who are so profoundly and negatively affected by its ministrations. This is an important and thought-provoking book, and one every concerned citizen should take the time and energy to read.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Insightful, Interesting & Thoughtful Look At The Luddites! 21 Jun. 2000
By Barron Laycock - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Rebels Against The Future" is a book with an important, relevant, and timely message. Written by Sales Kirkpatrick, long-time editor of "The Nation", who describes the historical struggle for human rights against the forces of technological innovation by way of the saga of Ned Ludd & his followers. By detailing this example, the author illustrates how difficult it is, both historically and culturally, for individual workers & ordinary people to successfully come to terms with the anonymous and often overwhelming forces of an intractable and self-propelled technical dynamic; industrial progress.
I first came across this book last year by way of the internet; an excerpt of it was posted on a neo-Luddite site I was browsing through. Reading this short portion hooked me on Mr. Kirkpatrick's writing style and substance. This is a book ostensibly devoted to the iconoclastic revolt by a small but determined group of nineteenth century English cottage workers against the hurtful introduction of new machines that, in essence, deprived them of an opportunity to make a living and support themselves and their families. It was the first documented account of a group rebelling against the enforced imposition by industrialists of new technology that was contrary to their own social and economic interests. It was not all machinery that the so-called "Luddites" rebelled against; it was only those technological innovations "but all Machinery hurtful to Commonality". He
forwards an impressive, multi-faceted argument; each facet of the argument bearing on various aspects of what the author associates with various characteristics of technologies.
Thus, Kirkpatrick ascribes a "motif industriale" on such technologically-based innovation such that; first, technologies are never neutral, & some are hurtful; second, industrialism is always a cataclysmic process, destroying the past, roiling the present, making the future uncertain; third, only those serving an apprenticeship to nature can be trusted with machines, fourth; the nation-state, synergistically intertwined with industrialism, will always come to its aid and defense, making revolts futile and reform ineffectual; fifth, that resistance to the industrial system, based on moral principles and rooted in some sense of moral revulsion, is not only possible but necessary; sixth, that resistance to industrialism must force not only "the machine question" but the viability of industrial society into public consciousness and debate; seventh, philosophically, resistance to industrialism has to be embedded in an ideology that is morally informed, carefully articulated, and widely shared; and eighth, if industrial civilization does not eventually crumble from determined resistance within its walls, it seems certain to eventually crumble of its accumulated excesses and instabilities.
Of course, the lessons from the experience of the Luddites are central to the issues of our own time. Everywhere in the burgeoning postindustrial world citizens face the same hurtful, impersonal, dehumanizing, and disenfranchising effects of the rapidly changing technological landscape. The central issue of runaway technological progress is the degree to which it determines the nature of the society it constantly interrupts, disrupts, and alters through its ceaseless dynamic of industrial innovation. There is no human face to this process, and it seems to be unresponsive, insensitive, and totally indifferent to the dehumanizing effect on the individual human beings who are so profoundly and negatively affected by its alterations, wrenching changes, and undemocratically derived consequences. This is an important and thought-provoking book, and one every concerned citizen should take the time and energy to read.
19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
Luddites, Technology, Industrialism, and Humanity 8 April 2000
By Robert David STEELE Vivas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Lessons from the Luddites for the Computer Age include: 1) Technologies are never neutral, and some are hurtful; 2) Industrialism is always a cataclysmic process, destroying the past, roiling the present, making the future uncertain; 3) "Only a people serving an apprenticeship to nature can be trusted with machines."; 4) The nation-state, synergistically intertwined with industrialism, will always come to its aid and defense, making revolts futile and reform ineffectual; 5) But resistance to the industrial system, based on some grasp of moral principles and rooted in some sense of moral revulsion, is not only possible but necessary; 6) Politically, resistance to industrialism must force not only "the machine question" but the viability of industrial society into public consciousness and debate; 7) Philosophically, resistance to industrialism must be embedded in an analysis-an ideology, perhaps-that is morally informed, carefully articulated, and widely shared; 8) If the edifice of industrial civilization does not eventually crumble as a result of determined resistance within its very walls, it seems certain to crumble of its own accumulated excesses and instabilities within not more than a few decades, perhaps sooner, after which there may be space for alternative societies to arise.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
A Comparitive Historical Analysis of the Luddite Movement 14 Mar. 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Sale's book addresses the historical context of the Luddite activities in early nineteenth century England. The book provides a conclusive description and analysis of the salient Luddite actions, an interpretation of the causes for the actions, and a synopsis of the ramifications of similar precendents on our own society.

Essentially, Sale suggests that Luddism was not simply a reaction to job losses through mechanization. Rather, Luddism was a product of social and economic tensions within England at the time. Bread riots and market riots are also offered as examples of a wider reaction to English policies in the early nineteenth century. By dissecting the Luddite phenomena, Sale indicates that the Luddite reaction, as a concerted movement, did not exist. Rather, Luddism refers to several forms of social reaction against economic and social difficulty
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback