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Raspberry Pi Super Cluster
 
 

Raspberry Pi Super Cluster [Kindle Edition]

Andrew K. Dennis
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

In Detail

A cluster is a type of parallel/distributed processing system which consists of a collection of interconnected stand-alone computers cooperatively working together. Using Raspberry Pi computers, you can build a two-node parallel computing cluster which enhances performance and availability.

This practical, example-oriented guide will teach you how to set up the hardware and operating systems of multiple Raspberry Pi computers to create your own cluster. It will then navigate you through how to install the necessary software to write your own programs such as Hadoop and MPICH before moving on to cover topics such as MapReduce. Throughout this book, you will explore the technology with the help of practical examples and tutorials to help you learn quickly and efficiently.

Starting from a pile of hardware, with this book, you will be guided through exciting tutorials that will help you turn your hardware into your own super-computing cluster. You’ll start out by learning how to set up your Raspberry Pi cluster’s hardware. Following this, you will be taken through how to install the operating system, and you will also be given a taste of what parallel computing is about. With your Raspberry Pi cluster successfully set up, you will then install software such as MPI and Hadoop. Having reviewed some examples and written some programs that explore these two technologies, you will then wrap up with some fun ancillary projects. Finally, you will be provided with useful links to help take your projects to the next step.

Approach

This book follows a step-by-step, tutorial-based approach which will teach you how to develop your own super cluster using Raspberry Pi computers quickly and efficiently.

Who this book is for

Raspberry Pi Super Cluster is an introductory guide for those interested in experimenting with parallel computing at home. Aimed at Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, this book is a primer for getting your first cluster up and running.

Basic knowledge of C or Java would be helpful but no prior knowledge of parallel computing is necessary.

About the Author

Andrew K. Dennis

Andrew K. Dennis is the Manager of Application Development at Prometheus Research. Prometheus Research is a leading provider of integrated data management for research and the home of HTSQL, an open source navigational query language for RDMS.

Andrew has a Diploma in Computing and a BS in Software Engineering; he is currently studying a second BS in Creative Computing in his spare time.

He has over 10 years of experience working in the software industry in the UK, Canada, and USA. This experience includes e-Learning, CMS and LMS development, SCORM consultancy, web development in a variety of languages, open source application development, and running a blog dedicated to maker culture and home automation.

His interests include web development, e-Learning, 3D printing, Linux, the Raspberry Pi and Arduino, open source projects, parallel computing, home automation, amateur electronics, home networking, and software engineering.

Many of these topics were covered in his previous book from Packt Publishing, Raspberry Pi Home Automation with Arduino.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 898 KB
  • Print Length: 126 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (20 Nov 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.ą r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00GTE1RXA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #345,782 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By David H
Format:Paperback
I've seen several YouTube videos showing clusters of Raspberry Pi's and, as I have a few Raspberry Pi's, thought I would have a go at building my cluster. Looking for information on how to do it, I came across this book which provides a great introduction into parallel computing and also provided very clear, concise instructions to set up a cluster of 2 Raspberry Pi's.

I love reading the back story to the things I learn and the first chapter provides a really good history to parallel/distributed computing. Setting up the Raspberry Pi's is covered in the second chapter and is done well and without going into the finite detail of setting up a Pi that is covered (and repeated!) in so many other places. In the third chapter, the process to setting up MPI on the Raspberry Pi's is covered which enables the Raspberry Pi's to be connected in a parallel computing environment. This is then taken forward into chapter 4 and where we set up Hadoop and MapReduce. Hadoop enables distributed applications to be written and MapReduce is intended to enable systems to process large datasets. In setting up MPI, Hadoop and MapReduce, simple applications are written but the book then brings this all together by writing an application to calculate pi using Hadoop, and then the same in MPI to compare the two technologies. Finally, the book provides some very useful information on how to take things further.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed reading and using this book to take me into an area of computing I've never delved into. I thought the book was concise, easy to read and the examples were clear and easy to follow and I'll certainly be keen to read Andrew K. Dennis' future books
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Book on How to Cluster some Pis with Hadoop 5 April 2014
Format:Paperback
To be honest and straightforward I expected more from a book with title like Raspberry Pi Super Cluster. The author Andrew K. Denis has a very clear vision on the subject (like in his previous book Raspberry Pi Home Automation with Arduino, which I liked a lot). He's done his best to deliver an exhaustive set-up while being concise at the same time, but it seems to me, this clearly is the wrong format for a book on the given topic.

Now having this book at hand, I finally got the chance to answer many of the questions I had about clustering, and how it can be applied to a set of Raspberry Pis. The first impression is that it is very well structured and gradual. Lets see, the first two chapters are short introductions to parallel computing (background history and the contemporary systems) and the initial set-up respectively. They're short and to the point. And that's the way it should be - it is presumed that if you're going parallel, then you're somewhat advanced tinkerer already.
Actually the second chapter is pretty abundant in details on how to install the operating system, the required software and tools. I skimmed through it, because I already had the two Raspberry Pi units pretty well equipped with what was needed.

The next chapter is the first encounter with a parallel software in the face of MPICH - one of the oldest and most widely adopted implementations of the MPI (Message Passing Interface) implementations, which is designed for applications written in C, C++ or Fortran. In this chapter we also come to one tricky part - setting up of the second (equally applicable to third, fourth, and so on) Raspberry Pi unit. It is tricky because it's a continuation of the set-up started in the second chapter and must be followed strictly.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An offline tutorial for a Cluster 24 Feb 2014
By Raśl - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I could describe this book as a really nice introduction to create your own Raspberry Pi cluster, consider this an offline compiled tutorial to do it yourself with some code that would give some insights to start your own apps. Little Java or C++ knowledge is necessary, but a lot of self enthusiasm for have it working. It is easy to read and it will walk you through step by step, but in order to bring all what it is exposed within, it is necessary to have the hardware in place (at least two Rasberry Pi).

I liked that the read is smooth, well explained and has a lot of e-references to extends on the contents provided, on the other hand, It would be a better book with more images and, for really tech people, more code to play with. This is the main reason to skip the 5 stars.

I read it in a day, but if you follow the guidelines step by step, it can take you at least a whole weekend to have everything up and running.

Overall a good read for your sunday night,
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fun projects for your extra Raspberry Pi's 7 Feb 2014
By nhevilwench - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I have a number of Raspberry Pi's sitting around from various projects I have experimented with in the past. I came across this book on building a cluster using two Raspberry Pi's.

The book guides you though MPI (Message Passing Interface) and Hadoop and provides novices with a good guide for getting started.

As well as software development aspects there are some fun little side projects like building your own stackable case using Lego's. There is also an interesting introduction to super computing to give you a background to the field.

Overall a great introduction to parallel computing aimed at the novice.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Step by step starter for distributed computing 27 Feb 2014
By Jack Creasey - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book isn't quite a Swiss Army Knife for Raspberry Pi, but it comes close.
Users of the book might fall into one of two main categories; you already have a ‘Pi and want to tackle something new and interesting, or the books objectives make you want to go and buy a couple of ‘Pi just to try this out. I think most folks may fall into the first category, but I actually fell into the second category, and the recent availability of a free Mathematica , and now the potential to play with a grown up MPI. Just to much to resist. My Pi’s are on order.
Chap 1 The first chapter is a backgrounder, YMMV depending on experience, but Andrew gets you used to the terminology of clustered multiprocessor systems.
Chap 2 The intro setup for your ‘Pi hardware and the network, pretty straightforward for the most. Then it dives into setting up the software for your primary ‘Pi.
If you don’t have a Linux background the first section is absolutely great…..follow the bouncing ball to install your software on the SD card. I found no mistakes, but I did feel that it lacked graphics that I think might help those with less Linux experience. By then end of the chapter you have a fully functioning system with Putty, Screen and Fortran installed.
Not having a Raspberry Pi is not a problem for the first section, you can download a QEMU based emulator and dive right in. You don’t need to install Berryboot since QEMU comes with the required Wheezy Raspbian distribution. All the other installation procedures are faultless, and by the end of Page 40 you have a running first node.
Chap 3 Installing and compiling MPI, flawless through to P46 on the emulator, though the compiles take a while. The rest of this chapter is cloning your SD card and bringing up the second cluster member.
Chap 4 and 5 Installing Java, Hadoop , HDFS and setting up the Trackers on the master ‘Pi. Andrew then goes through Java programming using the Map/Reduce functions to derive word counts in small text files. Small examples but this can scale to very large files.
Chap 6 Monte Carlo simulation is covered at a very high level using canned examples in Java and C with Hadoop and MPI, the user is left to discover the code in their own time and some may find this a somewhat overly glossy coverage of the materials. However there are links to all the application code and if this is your interest, you can dig deeper.
Chap 7 Goes off in a multiple directions:
1. Extending your physical ‘Pi configuration with additional USB storage, straightforward and useful.
2. Building a Lego case! Since there are very reasonable cases available for $10 or so, this seems really out of context for the book.
3. If you are into Fortran, an example of MPI programming, this really belonged at the end of Chap 6 so seems out of place here.
4. USB power supplies and power sources for powering your Raspberry Pi including Power Over Ethernet. While useful this section had the first broken link I found (Xtronic), and I’d suggest if you do want to do POE you search for “Raspberry Pi POE” online as there are a bunch of solutions.
All in all, if you view the book as helping you get to a point where you have a great development and experimental environment built, then it’s very worthwhile. The book loses its way somewhat toward the end, but all the information presented is clear and correct, and its a great jumping off point for further research.
I thoroughly enjoyed the book, and will delve further when I have my ‘Pi’s up and running. I would definitely recommend its value to someone just starting on the Raspberry Pi path, simply because of the clear and concise build and install descriptions.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A clear and concise introduction to parallel computing 3 Mar 2014
By David H - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I've seen several YouTube videos showing clusters of Raspberry Pi's and, as I have a few Raspberry Pi's, thought I would have a go at building my cluster. Looking for information on how to do it, I came across this book which provides a great introduction into parallel computing and also provided very clear, concise instructions to set up a cluster of 2 Raspberry Pi's.

I love reading the back story to the things I learn and the first chapter provides a really good history to parallel/distributed computing. Setting up the Raspberry Pi's is covered in the second chapter and is done well and without going into the finite detail of setting up a Pi that is covered (and repeated!) in so many other places. In the third chapter, the process to setting up MPI on the Raspberry Pi's is covered which enables the Raspberry Pi's to be connected in a parallel computing environment. This is then taken forward into chapter 4 and where we set up Hadoop and MapReduce. Hadoop enables distributed applications to be written and MapReduce is intended to enable systems to process large datasets. In setting up MPI, Hadoop and MapReduce, simple applications are written but the book then brings this all together by writing an application to calculate pi using Hadoop, and then the same in MPI to compare the two technologies. Finally, the book provides some very useful information on how to take things further.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed reading and using this book to take me into an area of computing I've never delved into. I thought the book was concise, easy to read and the examples were clear and easy to follow and I'll certainly be keen to read Andrew K. Dennis' future books.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Primer on Raspbery Pi & Cluster Computing 9 Mar 2014
By Billy F. Garcia - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
As the proud owner of more than 15 Raspberry Pis I am always looking for unique projects to either learn from or to implement something useful. This ebook gave me an opportunity to learn Big Data/Hadoop super computing concepts by actually implementing a working system, using the very popular low power and low cost Raspberry Pi SoC.

In the case of the Raspberry Pi Super Cluster i was able to get a first hand introduction to the RPi basics (Great for Noobs), but more importantly I was able to learn more about Hadoop and parallel computing by setting up my own working cluster with minimal effort. The book is well structured and should easy to follow for both experienced technologists and beginners alike.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to get a introductory understanding of Big Data or Parallel computing concepts in a fun and practical way using the Raspberry Pi.
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