Raising Steam: (Discworld novel 40) (Discworld series) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£7.69
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.96
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Raising Steam: (Discworld novel 40) (Discworld Novels) Hardcover – 7 Nov 2013


See all 27 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£6.33
Hardcover, 7 Nov 2013
£39.41 £7.70

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.


Trade In this Item for up to £0.96
Trade in Raising Steam: (Discworld novel 40) (Discworld Novels) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.96, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday (7 Nov. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857522272
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857522276
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 3.5 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,211 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,584 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sir Terry Pratchett was the acclaimed creator of the global bestselling Discworld series, the first of which, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983. In all, he was the author of fifty bestselling books. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he was the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal, as well as being awarded a knighthood for services to literature. Worldwide sales of his books now stand at 70 million, and they have been translated into thirty-seven languages.

Sir Terry Pratchett died on 12th March 2015

Photography © David Bird

Product Description

Review

"Laugh-out-loud funny...A chuffing wonderful book." (SFX)

"Terry Pratchett's creation is still going strong after 30 years as Ankh-Morpork branches into the railway age.There are sly nods to the history of railways and a cheeky reference to The Railway Children. Most aficionados, however, will be on the look-out for in-jokes and references from previous novels - of which there is no shortage.It is at the level of the sentence that Pratchett wins his fans." (The Times)

"The genius of Pratchett is that he never goes for the straight allegory. . .he remains one of the most consistently funny writers around; a master of the stealth simile, the time-delay pun and the deflationary three-part list. . .I could tell which of my fellow tube passengers had downloaded it to their e-readers by the bouts of spontaneous laughter." (Ben Aaronovitch The Guardian)

Book Description

The new Discworld novel from Britain's number one bestselling writer sees the Disc's first train come steaming into town.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rob Kitchin TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 20 Dec. 2014
Format: Paperback
Raising Steam is the 40th Discworld book in Terry Pratchett’s hugely successful fantasy/satire series. I’ve read all of them bar two. All of the books are consistently inventive, warmly humorous and satirical, and full of interesting characters and plots. Raising Steam focuses attention on two main themes and their juxtaposition -- the creation of new technologies and how they can transform societies and produce new issues, and the rise of extremist religious groups that hold highly traditional and conservative views and want to mold society in their vision. It’s an interesting tension, but in this case the story nonetheless feels like two quite different narratives being jammed together without ever fully blending. Moreover, while the book is in the fantasy genre, there were inconsistencies or convenient plot devices that felt clunky, some characters felt surplus to requirements, and there are sub-plots that go nowhere. For example, despite growing up relatively poor, Simnel’s mother just happens to have a fortune in the attic to fund the initial development of an engine. And when Simnel travels to Ankh-Morpork to demonstrate the engine he has to set up a track to do so; somehow the big, heavy engine made the journey without rails, but now needs them to run. We’re told of a wedding massacre and a young dwarf visiting his family being attacked, but these then sink without trace. The result, for me, was one of the weakest books in the series. Full of nicely penned characters (and there are an awful lot them, many from previous books snuck in for small cameo appearances), and packed with snippets of railway lore, but the plot not quite running on track.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Anna on 15 Aug. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Nothing stays the same.
Some of the reviews almost stopped me from reading the book. Definitely stopped me from buying it. I borrowed it from a friend and read it in 2 evenings. No, it's not bad. Yes, it's still Discworld. It's just changing in the direction that I personally don't like. But isn't our world, too? It's unfair to suggest it wasn't written by the author, that it's so bad it's a waste of money. If you're a true fan, buy it by all means, it's part of the history. Yes, it's quite serious, rather surprisingly bloody for Pratchett, innocent people actually die here and bad guys are too bad for the otherwise subtle Discworld. But hey, it is after all a mirror of worlds, isn't it? Witty repartee and fantastic jokes are all well, but sometimes - especially with 39 books so far - it has to be a bit more somber and a bit closer to home.
If you're ne to Pratchett, you could probably start with something else, but don't be put off. I was introduced to Discworld with Going postal. The book didn't have the best reviews either, and know what? Personally I loved it so much, I haven't stopped reading Pratchett since.
So take a risk, buy it or borrow it from a friend and see for yourself. Hopefully you'll be reaching for more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
168 of 185 people found the following review helpful By Steve Gardiner on 14 Nov. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The majority of the negative reviews on here - in particular the WONDERFUL review by A Nailor - kudos to you, that is the best review I've read on Amazon - aren't entirely wrong. I can completely understand why people are saying that the language, the characterisation, the plotting are all slightly... well, off. This has been true to a greater or lesser extent of all his novels since Monstrous Regiment, and may be (I'm really not sure) a result of Terry having to accommodate the use of speech recognition software in dictation of the novels. Certainly, they are very different animals from the earlier novels, which are much easier to read and full of snappy dialogue and splendid jokes.

So why am I giving this 5 stars? I certainly struggled through the first hundred pages, and felt my heart sinking more and more at the long and convoluted sentences, and the rather jarring scenes which seemed to have little to do with the plot.

But then, something just clicked. I slowed down my reading (and in fact went back to the beginning and reread it with a different mindset). Yes, it's not the same old Discworld, but underneath that it is still the product of the superb mind of Terry Pratchett. It took a lot of effort, but I could see what he was doing, and began to appreciate it. The humour is still there, if not so obvious and instantly accessible.

There's less overt magic, which as a fantasy addict I regret, but this is a grown-up Discworld, where magic is gradually giving way to the increasing industrialisation of Ankh-Morpork.

Do I miss the old Pratchett? Yes, of course. But this is a new phase in the developing world, and I'm glad that Terry Pratchett is still giving us valuable new insights into human (and other species) behaviour. Long may he continue to do so!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By B. Calascione on 22 Nov. 2014
Format: Hardcover
There's something very odd about the structure of this book. Its almost like a "collections" piece - long paragraphs of essays stitched together - you have a feeling it was produced in bursts, producing blocks of prose and then edited together. There is a lot of dialogue, and very little scene setting, and context. The overall affect is interesting, disconcerting, and weirdly like Pratchett in an alternative universe. As Pratchett is already in an alternative universe this kind of makes it double-weird.

As noted by other reviewers, its hard to read this novel without being reminded about the spectre of Pratchett's illness, and easy to interpret the foggy, dislocated, dream-sequence presentation of Discworld as being seen through the eyes of the author as he sees the world through his illness.

Is it a good book? Can I separate this book from the Author's reputation and my own experience of reading his books for the last 25 years? I honestly don't know if its any good. James Joyce is unreadable, but is hailed as a genius. Terry Pratchett is a genius. Is TP going out with a bang or a whimper? I guess time will tell.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback