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Raising Girls: Why girls are different - and how to help them grow up happy and confident Paperback – 1 Aug 2005

25 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Thorsons (1 Aug. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 000720485X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007204854
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 1.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 95,734 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

‘Read it, even if you have boys.’ Pru Goward, Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission

About the Author

Gisela Preuschoff is a psychologist and parenting author. Three decades of experience as a family therapist – and as a mother – have given her the wisdom about parenting girls that she brings to this book.


Inside This Book

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

124 of 127 people found the following review helpful By HoneyPot on 2 Feb. 2007
Format: Paperback
I read Biddulph's "Raising Boys" and it was wonderful. When I had my daughter, I thought I would read this one (endorsed by Biddulph: traitor!). This book annoyed me so much, that I actually sought out this space to vent my opinion. It is poorly written: the structure is disorganised and seems arbitrary, the paragraphs waffle, poor word choice makes it vague. The information varies from so obvious it didn't need to be stated, to so "out there" in a new-agey/feral sense that I couldn't relate, to completely off the topic, to downright insulting to boys. I got suspicious about page 6 and went to check her references. An over-reliance on Alan Pease sent the alarm bells ringing. She's supposed to be a psychologist, she could have done better than popular-psycho-babble-BS as a source. The author is opinionated. The photographs are even annoying (enjoy the one of a man sitting on the toilet pooping!) In short, I am so very disappointed that I would ask for my money back if I could!!
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298 of 314 people found the following review helpful By "steviesmalls" on 6 Aug. 2005
Format: Paperback
I have no doubt that this book will become a best seller as all parents are keen to raise a child that is balanced and happy in this difficult and challenging world. I found the book a profound disappointment, it was written in an extremely simplistic way, many of the points it made were obvious and mainly a re-hash of the Steve Biddulph books "How to raise happy children".
The advice is often conflicting and nonsensical. For example on page 87 we are told what toys to buy for young girls at 2 plus. Dolls, puppets, Accessories, however later in the book we are told that the reason western girls are underperforming in the sciences is because we indirectly encourage this by not developing their spatial awareness and teaching them to be helpless. The author then tells us that we should encourage play with numbers, blocks and more male based toys and those we should involve your child in typically male tasks. It takes as the norm that girls are not interested in playing with cars and trains (total nonsense in my very wide experience).
Coupled with some obvious type comments - girls like pets (particularly horses), (really!) and also music and sport (but don't over schedule them)!
What to do if your daughter gets pregnant "Then, the support of others to continue her schooling and settle in well with her new baby (and hopefully her partner) is essential to things working out. After all, a baby is a gift, even if the timing isn't right."
Err hello, well my daughter is only 2 but if she came home pregnant as a teenager I would want to go through all the options with her and support her choices. Including an abortion.
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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Liesl Hiscox on 28 Aug. 2007
Format: Paperback
After the birth of my son, I read ¨Raising Boys¨ by Steven Biddulph and found it extremely useful. After the birth of my daughter, I was looking for a similar book focusing on girls issues and came across this book. It started out well but totally lost me after Ms Preuschoff suggested that fairytales were great for girls but Barbie was bad. Apparently, girls can learn life lessons from fairytales whereas Barbie is just harmful. At no point in the book, does the author justify her view. In my opinion, if Barbie is bad for a girl then the fairytale ¨princess¨ stories filling little girls heads with beauty and romance are not good either, especially in the commercial Disney age in which we live. Basically, I feel that I learnt nothing from this book, and only came away disappointed by the author's hypocrisy.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Debbie Ashwood on 6 Mar. 2008
Format: Paperback
I like Steve Biddulph, and grabbed this book in a hurry (distracted by teething baby girl, tantrumming girl toddler and impatient 5 year old girl) without properly reading the blurb - my own fault but I thought this was the long-awaited mirror to Biddulph's Raising Boys and gratefully bought it.
Big disappointment - of course it is not by Biddulph (and I strongly feel he should not have endorsed it) and I gained very little from the book - most of it is either obvious, opinionated or waffle.
I learnt more about my three girls from Raising Boys!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By M. K. Carroll on 8 Feb. 2009
Format: Paperback
Rarely do books so irritate me that I am 'inspired' to review them. There are one or two excellent reviews of this absolute stinker which outline very coherently the book's lack of anything of value. I will just add my total embarrasment at the section about the special relationship between girls and horses. All that was missing is a picture of a unicorn on the front. Oh woe is me! Am I now going to fail as a parent because I do not have the means to bring a horse into my daughter's life? Buy this if you put no value on your time.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Cornus on 6 Jan. 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a disorganised, badly written book which is full of statements lacking justification.

Sometimes it's plain bewildering, like when the author spends 2.5 pages writing about how horse riding is really, really good for girls. It only makes sense when you learn later that author's daughter rides horses.

Sometimes it's laughable. eg the bit that goes "Do you know if organic veggies ("veggies"??) are available where you live? Have you thought about ("earth"?? who is that??) intended us to enjoy its product... this way you'll have your child eating almost everything you offer her." Having cooked home made organic food from scratch since weaning, only to be refused by an extremely fussy daughter, I was left speechless by this incredible and unjustified simplification.

Sometimes it's infuriating, like the quote about why did you have children if you were going to get them looked after by strangers. I'm a working mother always struggling with childcare, and I have observed that my son and my daughter have different physical/emotional aspects that need to be fulfilled by the childcarer. This book deals with none of those issues or differences. "I will give you one piece of advice about returning to work - follow your heart, if your financial situation allows it" is about as useful as it gets.

I think it's a load of ranting by someone with limited knowledge of the subject and limited writing skills (maybe it makes more sense in its original German version).
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