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Ma Rainey's Black Bottom (August Wilson Century Cycle) Hardcover – 6 Mar 2008


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 92 pages
  • Publisher: Theatre Communications Group Inc.,U.S. (6 Mar. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1559362995
  • ISBN-13: 978-1559362993
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.3 x 22.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,795,312 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Feb. 1999
Format: Paperback
This play shows how the rage caused by racism can be manifested in unusual ways. Each character, the blues singer and her band, has a different means of trying to gain control of a racist society hoping to, thereby, overcome it. The author's surprisingly humurous dialogue accentuates the story but, there is no mistaking the gravity of these characters's pain. Wilson's writing makes the play fast-paced and gives excellent insight to the histories of the individual characters. The use of blues lyrics and speech make them not just backdrops but characters, themselves. The abrupt ending seems a little forced, but the play is extremely entertaining.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 20 reviews
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
The insightful play is a mix of comedy and drama. 4 Feb. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This play shows how the rage caused by racism can be manifested in unusual ways. Each character, the blues singer and her band, has a different means of trying to gain control of a racist society hoping to, thereby, overcome it. The author's surprisingly humurous dialogue accentuates the story but, there is no mistaking the gravity of these characters's pain. Wilson's writing makes the play fast-paced and gives excellent insight to the histories of the individual characters. The use of blues lyrics and speech make them not just backdrops but characters, themselves. The abrupt ending seems a little forced, but the play is extremely entertaining.
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
An understanding of blues and history! 2 Mar. 2005
By RIZZO _*.*_ - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Recognized as a great American playwright with numerous awards, August Wilson has brilliantly chronicled the black experience through decades. Depicting the 1920s, he wrote "Ma Rainey" in 1982, a real life blues singer.

The scene for "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom", takes place in a recording studio in 1927 where two white music executives are making a record with blues singer, Ma Rainey and a group of musicians.

Because the focus is on four male band members. it may take a while to try to put a face with each character, but within a short time, you grasp who the characters are - their values, beliefs and fears.

Ma Rainey's tone of voice is profound and nobody can push her around. Some critics report that Ma Rainey was exploitive and abusive to her band members, but I certainly did not get that impression. She was just tough and she knew how important her role was in blues music! Ma Rainey didn't take any crap from the white executives or anyone.

The dialogue interweaves with Ma's performance onstage and the band members during rehearsals. Their identities evolve and it's clear who and why they are as they share their experience with racist America and we then know their role in a racist society and industry.

A dramatic ending caps the story when the most bitter player reacts violently when another member steps on his shoes. To me, the incident seemed unjustifiable to provoke such a violent reaction by another member. It appeared out of place.

If you have an interest in the work of a great playwright or another interpretation of black experience through the decades, read more from this amazing man.
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Talky, but interesting 10 Nov. 2003
By David Bonesteel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This play is set in a studio during the early days of sound recording. Ma Rainey's back-up band awaits the overdue arrival of the so-called Queen of Blues, discussing their lives and arguing about the music scene and their places in it. The white studio execs are practically tearing their hair out over Ma's tardiness and the demands that she is sure to make when she arrives. When she finally comes, she is every bit as demanding and overbearing as we expect, but also very perceptive-she is well aware that black artists are being exploited by the very record company people who continually urge her to be "reasonable" about the amount of money that she "wastes" on personal demands while recording the music that makes them so rich.
Although it features very good dialogue and some fine monologues, nothing much happens dramatically during the course of the play. There is an explosive finale, but it feels contrived and overdone, as though Wilson didn't know where to take his characters after all of the talking stopped.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Very Good Play, Not as Good as Some of Wilson's Others 13 Aug. 2006
By wheelockgroove - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the fourth play I have read by August Wilson, the other three being "Joe Turner's Come and Gone," "The Piano Lesson,"and "Fences" - the latter two won Pulitzer prizes. This play deals with the same social issues concerning black Americans that are standard in the plays of Wilson. Of the four I have read, this one is unique in that it is set in Chicago and not Pittsburgh. I must say, as good as this play was, the story did not have as many dimensions as the others I have read, and therefore, not as complex - making less room for character development. To be fair, this was one of Wilson's earlier plays, and perhaps he was still trying to develop the social element in his plays. My biggest praises for the play is that it is very funny at times, more so than the others with which I am familiar. Also, as a musician myself, I liked the setting of the play (a recording studio.) I must say, however, that the dramatic conclusion of the play was a little overdone and puzzling.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Heartfelt Play 29 Sept. 2009
By John F. Rooney - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
"Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" (1985) is part of August Wilson's "Century Cycle" of ten plays and is set in Chicago in the 1920's. The black bottom, a dance originated in New Orleans, became very popular during the twenties in the Flapper era. Ma Rainey, a successful singer tours around the country with her own band, and sings a black bottom song. Although she is the title character, she is not the main character in this play. Levee, who writes his own music, wants the band to adopt his style of playing, and wants his own band, is the central character. He even wants to steal Ma Rainey's girlfriend. He's a rebel who seems bent on self-destruction. Why not call the play "Levee's Gripes" rather than lead us to believe it's about the singer?
After a long section of Levee arguing with Ma's band members, we look forward to the entrance of Ma, hoping that she'll take over the play and give the play a more engrossing direction. She comes on stage, a very demanding and egotistical performer and sings her song, but she doesn't entirely take over the play. She is fed up with Levee and gets back at him.
The play takes place in recording studio in which the white record producer and Ma's white manager hold sway. Ma's band is supposed to be rehearsing while they're waiting for the diva to enter, but they are arguing and fighting. It's a very talky play with sections of songs such as when Slow Drag sings "Hear Me Talking to You." There are some funny lines in the play, and the entrance of Ma and her entourage is almost like an old vaudeville routine, like a movie from the twenties when she comes on stage with a cop in tow. Ma's insistence oh having her stuttering nephew sing is comic.
Levee's chief antagonist in the band is Toledo, the thinker and reader. This play deals with more racially charged issues than some of August Wilson's other plays. The eloquent speeches about race and the black experience are very significant and show Wilson unafraid to deal with the crucial issue.
The play has a melodramatic ending that really wasn't necessary. The play was one that Wilson put a great deal of time and effort into, but the structure of the play is flawed. Audiences may be moved by the earnestness and power of the speeches on race, but as a play it lacks a single-minded focus and unifying design.
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