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Rainbow's End: A Richard Jury Novel [Large Print] [Paperback]

Martha Grimes
2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Book Description

31 Dec 1995
"Once again, Grimes hooks her readers with the engaging Jury and friends and with skillful tucking of hints into unexpected corners."
--Publishers Weekly (starred review)
When three women die of "natural causes" in London and the West Country, there appears to be no connection--or reason to suspect foul play. But Scotland Yard Superintendent Richard Jury has other ideas, and before long he's following his keen police instincts all the way to Santa Fe, New Mexico.
There, in the company of a brooding thirteen-year-old girl and her pet coyote, he mingles with an odd assortment of characters and tangles with a twisted plot that stretches from England to the American Southwest. And while his good friend Melrose Plant pursues inquiries in London, Jury delves deeper into the more baffling elements of the case, discovering firsthand what the guide books don't tell you: that the Land of Enchantment is also a landscape ripe with tragedy, treachery, and murder.
"RAINBOW'S END is itself a literary rainbow. It's the skillful blend of mystery and comedy and pathos, a Martha Grimes trademark, that makes this visit with Richard Jury and company so memorable and satisfying."
--Mostly Murder


From the Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Paperback: 581 pages
  • Publisher: Large Print Editions; large type edition edition (31 Dec 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679762280
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679762287
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.5 x 3.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,363,889 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Martha Grimes is the author of twenty novels, eighteen of them Richard Jury mysteries. She lives in Washington DC and Santa Fe. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's not Britain as we know it - but it's fun! 10 Nov 2001
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is only the second book I have read by Grimes, but I am hooked enough to want to read more. The action of the book takes place in Britain and in the American South-west; the characters are already familiar, old friends from the first book I read. Grimes' characters are memorable and well-portrayed, her plots are good enough to make you want to keep guessing and not skip to the end. Her description of a dysfunctional British family is horribly funny. But - and there has to be a but - is she playing with us, the readers, or is she more naive than she should be? The blurbs say her books are accurate and well-researched, but the England she writes about, supposedly of the eighties and nineties, has not existed since the fifties, and then only in country house plays and novels. If her main character, Richard Jury, really remembers being a child in WWII, then shouldn't he have drawn a pension by now and retired gracefully from Scotland Yard, let alone from the yearning pursuit of aristocratic ladies?
It's many years since British policemen wore black mackintoshes and drove black police cars, and there are very few shops left of the quaintly old-fashioned type she describes.Anachronisms abound -maybe this is intentional, having fun with the reader. Reading Martha Grimes books, however, is fun, and who could, or should, ask for more?
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poor - as are the rest of this series 12 Jan 2006
Format:Paperback
Having read several of the Richard Jury novels years ago, I remembered why I stopped reading them when I started this one - chosen solely because I'm an English reader travelling to Santa Fe for the first time soon.
The chronological background of the book is ridiculous. It was written in the 1990's and is meant to be a contemporary setting, yet doesn't even remotely resemble the England I've lived in for the past 50 years. For example, there haven't been sweet shops such as the one she describes since the 1930's.
Richard Jury was supposedly a schoolboy during World War II, a fact made much of during the story. Even in the mid-1990's he'd be knocking on towards 60. The English part of the story is people with aristos and the gentility who mock the `ways' of the common folk, views which the reader seems to be expected to share. If it's meant as parody, it singularly fails to convince. If the book had been set in the 1920's the attitudes towards class of its characters might be more believable. Indeed, many of the 'characters' are merely ludicrous caricatures - e.g. the 'loveable'(read *very* sub-Dickensian, & wouldn't be out of place in a poor Dicken's knock-off 150 years ago) cockney-rogue family with a baby named Robespierre are deeply irritating, and their antics farcical. Perhaps the book - and this is true of the other Grimes crime I have read - is aiming for the surreal, but all it arouses in this reader is perplexity and irritation. Frankly, to portray England as like this in the 1990's is silly.
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Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  31 reviews
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Performance by Tim Curry! 28 Nov 1999
By Nancy A. Fox - Published on Amazon.com
This mystery, another in the installment of books featuring Inspector Richard Jury is quite fascinating. What could an American woman found dead at Old Sarum, a wealthy British lady found dead at the Tate Gallery in London and a second English woman found dead at Exeter Cathedral have in common? At first glance not much, except that they're all dead.
Inspector Jury discovers connections to New Mexico, and travels there to discover what else connected these women. Without giving any more of the plot away, it's quite an interesting story with a few interesting twists and turns.
Since I listened to the abridged audio cassette, I must mention Tim Curry's delightful performance. He gives distinct vocal characterizations to all the players in the story, and keeps you totally engrossed in the story. The only complaint I have is that a secondary plotline is not abridged very well, and its wrap up leaves a lot to be desired.
24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Long on words, short on substance 26 Dec 2000
By T. Sunderland - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I've read the majority of Grimes' books, including several non-Jury ones and, actually I was quite disappointed with this one. It's long (over 400 pages) and tends to plod meandering between Jury, Plant, Wiggins, the inimitable Cripse family, but to me never really goes anywhere to adding to the story or, importantly, its resolution - more little vignettes of peoples lives rather than mystery tale. Naturally, there's Jury's ongoing personal dilemma of being constantly without female companionship and far too much time wasted on his self-analysis of quitting smoking, while other characters bog down the story with equal non-relevant issues.
The crimes are resolved over the final ten or so pages, with the previous text not really factoring into the story at all. I would have to say, not one of Ms. Grimes better efforts.
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Really poor, and symptomatic of the whole series. 10 Sep 2005
By MysteryWriter - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Having read several of the Richard Jury novels years ago, I remembered why I stopped reading them when I started this one - chosen solely because I'm an English reader travelling to Santa Fe for the first time soon.

The chronological background of the book is ridiculous. It was written in the 1990's and is meant to be a contemporary setting, yet doesn't even remotely resemble the England I've lived in for the past 50 years. For example, there haven't been sweet shops such as the one she describes since the 1930's.

Richard Jury was supposedly a schoolboy during World War II, a fact made much of during the story. Even in the mid-1990's he'd be knocking on towards 60. The English part of the story is people with aristos and the gentility who mock the `ways' of the common folk, views which the reader seems to be expected to share. If it's meant as parody, it singularly fails to convince. If the book had been set in the 1920's the attitudes towards class of its characters might be more believable. Indeed, many of the 'characters' are merely ludicrous caricatures - e.g. the 'loveable'(read *very* sub-Dickensian, & wouldn't be out of place in a poor Dicken's knock-off 150 years ago) cockney-rogue family with a baby named Robespierre are deeply irritating, and their antics farcical. Perhaps the book - and this is true of the other Grimes crime I have read - is aiming for the surreal, but all it arouses in this reader is perplexity and irritation. Frankly, to portray England as like this in the 1990's is insulting. I don't read mysteries for the realism or the social analysis, I read to escape, but if the writer wants me to suspend disbelief she had better make a *bit* more of an effort not to get her setting so wildly incorrect.

The book also features two child-characters, one carried over from a previous book, both annoying rather than endearing or intriguing, which was apparently the intention.

I couldn't wait to finish it, and I mean that in the worst possible way.

Oh - the plot. The solution to the crime was obvious well before the end - and well before Richard Jury eventually tumbled to it - and it wasn't very original or clever, either, despite all the attempts at befuzzlement and mystification.

This book and series, though purportedly set in the UK, is certainly not meant for anyone who knows anything about us!
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 13th Grimes mystery read with panache by Curry 27 July 2004
By Deborah MacGillivray - Published on Amazon.com
This is the 13th Jury and Plant mystery penned by the brilliant Grimes. Once again read by the amazing Tim Curry, Rainbow's End takes up just a "few weeks" after The Horse You Came In On ended. The newest case for Scotland Yard Chief superintendent Richard Jury, sees Jury again on the wrong side of the Pond. He is there to dismiss or confirm similarities among three mysterious deaths, two are British women - one dies in Exeter Catherdral and the second in the Tate Gallery. The Third was an American, one Angela Hope, a Santa Fe silversmith, while visiting the ancient hill fortress Old Sarum. He is not able to dismiss the threads that tie the three deaths together, but becomes convinced, since all three had recently been in New Mexico, USA, they are be connected. While Jury does the foot work in the US, he has set Melrose Plant to tracking down Lady Jenny Kennington. She vanished -literally - while at Straford-on-Avon.
Once again Grimes gives you a bang-on murder mystery with sleuth Jury hot on the trail of clues, and Melrose showing, as an amateur, his is a nifty investigator, too. Grimes humor shines, and is brought to life by Curry's wonderful reading. Sheer perfection from start to finish.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rainbows end 4 Mar 2014
By avidreader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Good read as usual. Already to get on to the next in the series. Enjoyed it and you will too.
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