Rail Band - Salif Keita|Mory Kanté
 
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Rail Band - Salif Keita|Mory Kanté

8 May 1999 | Format: MP3

£6.21 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
7:06
30
2
3:56
30
3
7:14
30
4
10:26
30
5
4:48
30
6
7:34
30
7
5:02
30
8
4:22
30
9
7:45

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Product details

  • Label: Sonodisc
  • Copyright: (c) 1999 MRC
  • Total Length: 58:13
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B009D1AAHU
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Maningrey LSS on 26 May 2011
Format: Audio CD
I am a beginner as far as world music goes, I got into African music mainly through an interest in the guitar playing, particularly the work of Thomas Mapfumo. I have another later album by the Rail Band (as I heard the guitar player Djelimady Tounkara was something special) called New Dimensions in Rail Culture which is much smoother and mellower compared to this one. There is no information on this albums sleeve and a lot of it would be described as bootleg quality on a rock album, it reminds me in places of the feel of Television's CD The Blow Up, not just in sound quality but oddly in the guitar playing and raucous atmosphere. The super compressed sound and jagged trebly guitars sound like early Velvets. At first I found this off putting as the early tracks are so so but by the middle of the CD it all starts to make sense. I know both the singers went on to solo and international success but I did not have a lot of idea who they were however both are excellent, particularly, I think Mory Kante who has a harsh high wail that really sets the hair on end and the teeth on edge, it a good way!

The guitar playing is great but much more in the ensemble feel of a lot of African music rather than the more lead kora sounding work on New Dimensions in Rail Culture. Lots of little melodies appear and vanish and it can be confusing to more pop/rock attuned listeners, you can see where Miles Davis got a lot of his influences during his rock funk phaze, he was of course inspired by Sly Stone and James Brown but I think the African feel of albums like On The Corner owe a lot to this.

So I would say this CD is worth a punt but I found it cheap so another alternative is the Belle Epoque series which is three double CDs of similar work. I also recommend Bembeya Jazz National.
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