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Rachmaninov : Symphony No.2
 
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Rachmaninov : Symphony No.2

6 May 2010 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
26:13
30
2
11:02
30
3
15:32
30
4
14:27
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 July 1994
  • Release Date: 6 May 2010
  • Label: Warner Classics International
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:07:14
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001LH1PUU
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 60,054 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Luca on 25 Mar. 2013
Format: Audio CD
Rachmaninoff's name is obviously strongly associated with pianistic performances and piano compositions. This fact, very often, leads to put in background, if not to underrate, except the "Vespers", his non-pianistic compositions.

As a consequence of the disastrous Saint Petersburg 1897 première of his First Symphony, Rachmaninoff entered a long depressive crisis. Only by means of psychotherapy he was able to recover self-confidence in his composing capacities; it is not by chance that his second Piano Concerto (1901) is dedicated to his psychologist Nikolai Dahl.

This Second Symphony was composed during Rachmaninoff's retire in Dresden, where he and his family lived nearly as hermits, from 1906-07 winter to 1909-10 winter. It was a period of intense study and composition.
The first sketches did not satisfied a not yet self-confident Rachmaninoff, but, at the end, the new symphony was successfully premiered in St. Petersburg on 8 February 1908, under the baton of the composer himself (one of the main causes of the First Symphony flop is commonly attributed to Alexander Glazunov's bad conducting of the premiere).
The full success greatly contributed to Rachmaninoff's definitive psychological healing.

The symphony is constructed in the pattern established by Borodin and Balakirev, with an introductory first movement, the Scherzo as second movement, preceding the third slow movement - where the "dramatic sequence" reaches its climax -, while the fourth movement has a "recapitulative" function of all the themes previously exposed.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A truly Russian great symphony in Kurt Sanderling's masterful lecture. 25 Mar. 2013
By Luca - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Rachmaninoff's name is obviously strongly associated with pianistic performances and piano compositions. This fact, very often, leads to put in background, if not to underrate, except the "Vespers", his non-pianistic compositions.

As a consequence of the disastrous Saint Petersburg 1897 première of his First Symphony, Rachmaninoff entered a long depressive crisis. Only by means of psychotherapy he was able to recover self-confidence in his composing capacities; it is not by chance that his second Piano Concerto (1901) is dedicated to his psychologist Nikolai Dahl.

This Second Symphony was composed during Rachmaninoff's retire in Dresden, where he and his family lived nearly as hermits, from 1906-07 winter to 1909-10 winter. It was a period of intense study and composition.
The first sketches did not satisfied a not yet self-confident Rachmaninoff, but, at the end, the new symphony was successfully premiered in St. Petersburg on 8 February 1908, under the baton of the composer himself (one of the main causes of the First Symphony flop is commonly attributed to Alexander Glazunov's bad conducting of the premiere).
The full success greatly contributed to Rachmaninoff's definitive psychological healing.

The symphony is constructed in the pattern established by Borodin and Balakirev, with an introductory first movement, the Scherzo as second movement, preceding the third slow movement - where the "dramatic sequence" reaches its climax -, while the fourth movement has a "recapitulative" function of all the themes previously exposed.

I like this work, attentively constructed, heartfelt, rich of interesting melodic ideas, harmonic solutions and orchestral colours; in particular, it is not "overloaded" of notes as, on the contrary, other Rachmaninoff's compositions are.
Not only the formal structure, but, and most important, also the alternation between intense sadness and serene, joyful, moments and accents is so idiomatically and truly Russian: very involving!

The great Kurt Sanderling (1912-2011) masters the idiom and he gives us a well balanced, warm and intimate interpretation. He had already recorded in 1956, for DG, the cut version of the work. Here, he obviously presents - as usual since 1968 first commercial recording of the complete symphony by Kletzky-Decca - the complete version (66'20"), that is the one which allows the work to correctly breath and to fully express its refined sentimental contents.
The understanding with the Philharmonia Orchestra is perfect (Sanderling was appointed Conductor Emeritus of the Orchestra), resulting in an attentive, precise and involving performance.

The 1984 DDD sound of this studio recording is excellent, pure and airy.

The thin booklet contains a brief, but interesting, account, in German, by Gottfried Blumenstein, also translated in English and French.

In my opinion, the direct competitor of this interpretation is the 1988 Gennady Rozhdestvensky-LSO recording, which gives us another great reading of this outstanding work.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Hors concors among Rach's 2nds 15 Feb. 2012
By Colloredo von Salzburg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is a breathtaking performance of this great symphony! It is one of the longest versions on record (67')
but what a glorious 67 minutes they are! Maestro Sanderling caresses every note and every detail and relishes every
bar of this high-tide late romantic epic. His orchestra sounds voluptuously ample and the strings sing and seethe
remarkably well. The soundstage illusion is that of a grand concert-hall because of a wonderful sound catching.
The dynamic range is very wide. Sanderling spends time reinventing each phrase and contour, breathing in significances
and texts. Despite the long playing time Sanderling weighs and shapes the phrases and momentum with such experienced
judgement that the whole thing works well. His nemesis however comes in the finale which demands a galvanic and euphoric
rush. Here however it sounds a bit dull, bizarre and disappointing when you compare with all preceding movements. This is
with no doubt one of the highest peaks in performances of this symphony. A jewel.
1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Terrible... Don't bother... This is so slow, it's annoying... 20 Mar. 2011
By R. J. Gonzalez - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
After giving us a great mono version of this work (even with HUGE cuts, that are completely unnecessary) with the Leningrad orchestra on DG, Sanderling proves that lightning does not strike twice in the same place.

This is so slow, I almost thought someone opened the score to Parsifal on the desk for the conductor.

Don't waste your money on this turkey. I sold my copy for used and will not miss the misery it gave me... UGH
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