or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.2 And Works For Piano

Vladimir Ashkenazy Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: £8.16 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 11 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Amazon's Vladimir Ashkenazy Store

Music

Image of album by Vladimir Ashkenazy

Photos

Image of Vladimir Ashkenazy

Biography

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY – BIOGRAPHY

“When the Sydney Symphony Orchestra acquired Vladimir Ashkenazy as its new Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor, Australian classical music fans rejoiced over their good fortune in landing an undisputed legend. Often regarded as one of the preeminent solo pianists of the present era, over the years, Ashkenazy has also acquired equally ... Read more in Amazon's Vladimir Ashkenazy Store

Visit Amazon's Vladimir Ashkenazy Store
for 315 albums, 12 photos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.2 And Works For Piano + Brahms: Piano Concertos
Price For Both: £20.48

Buy the selected items together
  • Brahms: Piano Concertos £12.32

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Audio CD (5 Sep 2001)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: CLASSICAL
  • ASIN: B000058BAY
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 119,222 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Rachmaninov : Piano Concerto No.2 in C minor Op.18 : I Moderato
2. Rachmaninov : Piano Concerto No.2 in C minor Op.18 : II Adagio sostenuto
3. Rachmaninov : Piano Concerto No.2 in C minor Op.18 : III Allegro scherzando
4. Rachmaninov : 13 Preludes Op.32 : No.12 in G sharp minor
5. Rachmaninov : 9 Etudes-tableaux Op.33 : No.1 in F minor
6. Rachmaninov : 9 Etudes-tableaux Op.33 : No.2 in C major
7. Rachmaninov : 9 Etudes-tableaux Op.33 : No.9 in C sharp minor
8. Rachmaninov : Variations on a Theme of Corelli in D minor Op.42

Product Description

Amazon.co.uk

The Canadian pianist Hélène Grimaud displays ample keyboard brilliance on this all-Rachmaninov release. The Second Concerto has been recorded often, and she doesn't challenge the versions of Richter, Rubinstein, Wild and Janis, among others. Her clean, hard-edged brightness detracts from the Romantic spirit of the first movement, pedestrian winds and dreamy tempos vitiate the Adagio sostenuto, and Ashkenazy's fussy conducting and the muddy sound don't help either. In the short pieces, Grimaud offers subtle shadings of light and colour, but without the quicksilver dash and brio we hear from past masters such as Moiseiwitsch. The Variations on a Theme of Corelli, though, are a complete success. She shapes the statement of the theme with precisely the right weight and shading and manages the varied changes of mood and styles within this 17-minute marvel to perfection. The sound in the Corelli Variations is outstanding, far superior to the rest of the disc, which was made in other venues by other technicians, suggesting that the "real" Grimaud can be found in this wonderfully lucid Romantic gloss on the Baroque. --Dan Davis

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Refreshing and Interesting! 16 May 2001
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
Some of the greatest pianists of the 20th century have given us stand-out recordings of Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto. That stellar group must include Artur Rubinstein and Van Cliburn, who each offered rousing performances with Fritz Reiner and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Sviatoslav Richter's 1959 recording with Stanislaw Wislocki and the Warsaw Philharmonic remains powerful, commanding, and, for some, definitive. Outside this group, many recordings have a certain tedious familiarity, but I have to disagree with Dan Davis, who puts this effort by Helene Grimaud and Vladimir Ashkenazy in the mass of undistinguished or "pedestrian" recordings. The key to the great recordings seems to be the ability of pianists like Rubinstein, Cliburn, or Richter to stand up against Rachmaninov's magnificent orchestral score, one that has overpowered the playing of many others including Evgeny Kissin, Gary Graffman, and Earl Wild. Rather than competing on that level, Grimaud and Ashkenazy take a radically different hold on the concerto, one that is fresh, interesting, and substantially different from Grimaud's first recording in 1993. Ashkenazy's "fussy conducting" in fact contains the orchestra and allows Grimaud the dominant voice in the concerto. Grimaud responds with a breathtaking but subtle performance, combining lyrical beauty, sensitivity, and remarkable clarity. In the notes to the CD, Grimaud speaks of the "different kind of freedom" possible in working with a conductor who is an accomplished pianist and it certainly shows in this recording. Given the choice of only one version, I would still choose Richter's 1959 recording - fortunately, I don't have to make that choice. Anyone who has grown weary of "samey" recordings should enjoy this refreshing interpretation by Grimaud and Ashkenazy.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One to have 22 Mar 2013
By Mr. Christopher Harris VINE VOICE
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I have a number of versions of this work and this one from Grimauld/Ashkenazy is now close to the top of my personal list. The balance between soloist and orchestra is excellent and I suspect that this is due to the conductor being one of the great pianists of our time and he knows how to achieve this. Grimauld is one of my favourite pianists and she doesn't disappoint here bringing a depth of understanding that not everybody can achieve. (If you get a chance to see her live don't miss it!)

A very easy recommendation!

PS I don't mind the pictures of Grimauld, she is very easy on the eye. :-)
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning 7 July 2012
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Aside from the slightly tacky "classical music babe" photoshots they chose to market this disc, it is a stunning aural display of a deeply talented musician. She brings a touch, fluency and subtlety of emphasis to these works which few modern pianists can match - in my opinion.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  16 reviews
34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Refreshing and Interesting! 15 May 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Some of the greatest pianists of the 20th century have given us stand-out recordings of Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto. That stellar group must include Artur Rubinstein and Van Cliburn, who each offered rousing performances with Fritz Reiner and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Sviatoslav Richter's 1959 recording with Stanislaw Wislocki and the Warsaw Philharmonic remains powerful, commanding, and, for some, definitive. Outside this group, many recordings have a certain tedious familiarity, but I have to disagree with Dan Davis, who puts this effort by Helene Grimaud and Vladimir Ashkenazy in the mass of undistinguished or "pedestrian" recordings. The key to the great recordings seems to be the ability of pianists like Rubinstein, Cliburn, or Richter to stand up against Rachmaninov's magnificent orchestral score, one that has overpowered the playing of many others including Evgeny Kissin, Gary Graffman, and Earl Wild. Rather than competing on that level, Grimaud and Ashkenazy take a radically different hold on the concerto, one that is fresh, interesting, and substantially different from Grimaud's first recording in 1993. Ashkenazy's "fussy conducting" in fact contains the orchestra and allows Grimaud the dominant voice in the concerto. Grimaud responds with a breathtaking but subtle performance, combining lyrical beauty, sensitivity, and remarkable clarity. In the notes to the CD, Grimaud speaks of the "different kind of freedom" possible in working with a conductor who is an accomplished pianist and it certainly shows in this recording. Given the choice of only one version, I would still choose Richter's 1959 recording - fortunately, I don't have to make that choice. Anyone who has grown weary of "samey" recordings should enjoy this refreshing interpretation by Grimaud and Ashkenazy.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Among Grimaud's Finest Concerti Recordings 16 Jun 2001
By John Kwok - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I wasn't certain why Grimaud chose to record again Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Concerto, since her earlier recording with Lopez-Cobos conducting the Royal Philharmonic is still in print. Yet I was truly amazed with her latest release. Unlike Richter and others who have emphasized the dramatic qualities of Rachmaninov's score, here she opts for a more subtle, lyrical approach; contrary to what a reviewer wrote, she succeeds admirably. Ashkenazy's "fussy" conducting and the Philharmonia's magnificient playing yields an orchestral performance that is definitely better than the Royal Philharmonic's. Indeed, I agree with a previous reviewer who notes how Ashkenazy's conducting ensures that Grimaud is the star of this performance. Her playing of Rachmaninov's solo piano pieces is as subtle and lyrical as her performance of the concerto; of these undoubtedly the best is the Corelli Variations. Hopefully Ms. Grimaud will soon commence recording the rest of Beethoven's, Brahms' and Rachmanionv's concerti.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars **** 1/2 For her, Grimaud is a bit subdued, but there's charisma anyway 5 Sep 2011
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Because it reaches for excesses of gloom and lusciousness, the Rachmaninov Second is hard to ruin; it resists parody by going so far beyond parody itself. Richter made a classic recording in 1959 by approaching the score with sobriety, even somberness, backed up with enormous keyboard authority. In recent years a few pianists and conductors have tried to reduce the sugar content and deliver a leaner reading - I'm thinking lately of Simon Trpceski and Vasily Petrenko, who risk that elegance can substitute for vulgar sentiment. But why mess around wit a monument to sentiment like this one?

Grimaud hasn't been terribly fortunate with the conductors provided by Teldec (Sanderling, Masur, Ashkenazy), who invariably lack her volatile originality. That's true in spades here. Ashkenazy provides a blowsy accompaniment whose expressive gestures are laid on with a trowel - note the huge ritard near the coda of the first movement. But then he turns around and underplays the famous tune in the third movement, for no apparent reason. Grimaud is also not allowed much spontaneity or flashes of brilliance. If you have the technique, the score all but plays itself. I think I fall in line with reviewers who feel that she is too restrained, but that's not to gainsay Grimaud's musicality and her ability to sustain the long line. Like Trpceski, she seems to see the orchestra as equal partner, not simply wallpaper in front of which dazzling keyboard effects are displayed. She adds a note of delicacy in the fleet passagework of the finale that's very appealing where others stab at the keyboard with daggers.

As is usual with her programming on disc, Grimaud offers solo pieces as fillers. After four miniatures - one Prelude and three Etudes-Tableaux, the substantial Corelli Variations finish up. I'll confess to having a limited appetite for Rachmaninov's piano music. To my ear, she sounds splendid in every piece, always holding one's attention with urgency and feeling. Like Vladimir Horowitz,another highly stylized, charismatic performer, Grimaud imposes herself on these pieces, and if that imposition thrills you, as millions were thrilled by Horowitz, thee can be few complaints about failing to give a sober account of the score.
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is an exciting interpretation of Rach 2 9 April 2007
By justwarren - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I have read all of the negative and luke warm comments here. All I can say is I have heard several of the aforementioned interpretations of Rach 2 and I found this one to be one of the most "exciting" and musically interesting. I have listened to this CD easily over 50 times in my car and at home. I love it! I love it even more today than I did when I first heard it. This "test of time" is my ultimate litmus test for a classical music CD.

Grimaud has a distinctive musical sensibility. At times she plays very bold, she conjures an image of a large Russian man. But she can also display the sensitivity of a small, sensitive, French woman, which she is. All I can say to the reviewers who critiqued this CD negatively is that to me, Grimaud communicates an "organic" excitement in her interpretation and performance that has made it one of my all time favorites! I highly recommend it!
10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Concerto fine - solo playing falls to routine 28 April 2005
By David H. Spence - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This disc of all Rachmaninov by Helene Grimaud splits just about evenly into two halves - the first devoted to the Second Piano Concerto and the rest to solo pieces.

Orchestra, at its first entrance starting the main theme of the first movement, sounds recessed - corrected by the end of the first long phrase or so. The Philharmonia, under Ashkenazy, once clearly heard, reveals an orchstra that has maintained its depth over a good number of years. Transitions during the Exposition section to follow appear unduly choppy. Grimaud, while revealing secure technique and decent feel for the idiom, has a habit of surging forward with the line here a couple of times, and also at the beginning of the cadenza in the Adagio sostenuto, regardless of what may follow. The piano, again, is somehow brought forward very quickly and briefly by the mikes for the last chord or two of a big stretto before the introduction of the second theme, and similar happens a couple of other times during this movement. Most of the remainder of the first movement, with fine sound quality when not tweaked with, goes by very well, if only conventionally so.

The Adagio is played in a much-to-be-expected subdued manner, with a good feeling for color from both orchestra and soloist and the right amount of sweep to the coda section. The finale starts off in fine well-sprung rhythm from the orchestra and bravura from the soloist, but come the Development section, Grimaud, who has somewhat mechanically played the trills at the quiet close of the Exposition, charging forward, clips, or enters the Development section a good half a beat early. Ensemble problems plague several tricky moments throughout. The affirmative, yet very loud tutti by the orchestra at the end of this section seems unnaturally abetted by one or two folks at the control board. The return of the romantic second theme is again handled conventionally, but possibly for bravura effect, scherzando triplets get clipped, especially insipid when doubled by flutes, yet only a momentary distraction up to the final, climactic passages to both the finale and the entire concerto, the big theme within rendered in its usual byzantine gold and bronze.

The G-Sharp Minor prelude from the close of the opus 32 collection of twelve, serves as segue between concerto and several of the opus 33 etudes-tableaux and Corelli Varations to follow. The feeling for atmosphere and color is fine for the prelude, but Grimaud's playing gets a bit weighed down by chronic anticipation of the downbeat, and other minute hesitations along the same lines - device used again to heigthen the dramatic effect of strings of repeated chords in the closing C-sharp Minor etude-tableaux from Opus 33, but undercut by heavy chords, for all the aggressive handling of them, are not heard in their full weight or resonance. Such feeling for chords and octaves crudely interrupts the plaintive trio section of the first etude-tableaux, which closes with light tolling of bells in the upper right hand. Grimaud's gilding of this passage, which negates its intended effect, is ironically a lesson in more-is-less, less-is-more. The second etude-tableaux on the disc has the right feeling for the lyric line, but pushed a little too hard in the accompaniment to be allowed its full flower.

Grimaud's playing for most of the solo pieces, and especially the Corelli Variations reveals more of her true personality than her playing in the concerto. Her anti-romantic sensibilities, turned mystic and postmodern by now to remain in step with current fashion, among the current echelon of pianists championing the heavily tried and true Romantic repertoire, come quickly to the fore.

Feeling for pulsation, line (especially in the slow, reflective D-Flat Major variations and intermezzo that precedes them) and color is weak in the Corelli Variations. The austerity and even strangeness of this music is made more remarkable from the pianist who inculcates inner contrast between the recidivist qualities (even if drained of life) of this music and modernist, instead of bleaching out so much of this contrast. Grimaud takes the modernism of the piece doctrinaire and as entirely her calling card, making her interpretation of the variations heavily two-dimensional. Even heavy chords are frequently shortened of their full note value and played in strict rhythm, regardless of harmonic change through them or underneath.

Again, the qualities that I rue about this kind of playing should not disappoint Grimaud fans, and even the slightly higher endorsement I make of this disc may be so much so at the outset to worry a few. Outside of those people, the combination of popular concerto and thirty-minute sampling of solo repertoire will seem cumbersome to the average collector. Those who have Ashkenazy, with Kondrashin for the Second or Haitink for the set of four, for the concerti, or for solo repertoire (etudes, variations especially fine), are in good hands.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback