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RUNNERS WORLD RUN LESS RUN FASTER: Become a Faster, Stonger Runner with the Revolutionary First Training Program Paperback – 5 Dec 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Rodale Books,US (5 Dec 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159486649X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594866494
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2 x 23 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 206,261 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

BILL PIERCE, a collegiate half-miler and experienced marathoner, is professor and chair of Furman's Health and Exercise Science Department. SCOTT MURR, an experienced marathoner and 10-time Ironman Triathlon finisher, is director of Furman's Fitness Center and a lecturer in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Furman. RAY MOSS, who designed the FIRST laboratory physiological testing protocol, is professor of health and exercise science and director of the Molnar Human Performance Laboratory at Furman.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By D. Hull on 28 Nov 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been running for over 40 years and have probably tried just about every variant you can think of in my pursuit of the perfect training schedule - though up until recently I've tended to favour higher mileage routines. As I get older, I've found that I break more easily and take longer to put myself back together. So anything promising less mileage while still producing good results was bound to grab my attention. This book is essentially about quality over quantity with a bit of cross-training thrown in. You basically do three quality sessions a week (one long run, one tempo and one interval session) - that's it running wise - no recovery or steady runs - nope, just three balls-out running sessions, interspersed with a couple of days cross-training (like cycling, swimming etc). The book gives a lot of theory as to why this works though most of it is anecdotal rather than hard scientific proof. They provide many case studies to support their claims. It's fascinating stuff and for some people it may be the answer but I'm not convinced it will work for everyone. I didn't make serious progress on this regime until I added some additional recovery mileage - an extra three days to be precise - but I must emphasise this was very slow running - real recovery stuff. I found this worked better for me than three days of rest. So I'm kinda following the regime in that I do the three hard sessions, plus the cross-training but have substituted three rest days with three recovery runs. Why I get much better results by simply adding three very easy runs - some would say junk mileage - I don't know - but I do know that it works for me, regardless of the science. What this book has done for me is to remind me that hard sessions should be really hard and easy sessions should be really easy - too much of my running was average pace, so in that respect it has earned it's price tag.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kev the Greenman on 10 Oct 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I started off running every other day, instinctively having recovery days to avoid injury; then I started following training plans which involved a lot more running resulting in feeling burnt out, cruising close to an injury and not running any faster.

I'd read about this system early on and I thought that it was in sympathy with my natural instinct to run a bit harder when I ran and then recover and let my body adapt during the rest days. I bought this book and followed the 10k training plan. Result: 10k pb, no injuries and feeling better about training.

With this system, you don't do the same thing twice in a week, there are just three "quality" runs each of which have a different focus and real purpose, which helps me to keep the interest and enthusiasm for training. "Junk" running just for the sake of doing lots of miles is replaced with cross training e.g. cycling or swimming; I don't even do this as I have a very physical job which is cross training enough!

The charts on paces based on your latest race results are really good ensuring that, while pushing you, you don't train harder than you're currently capable of making it suitable for runners of all abilities. This also makes it really easy to follow the training plans.

I consider myself a beginner, running for just over a year with only four 10k races under my belt so I'm far from being very knowlegeable on the subject, but what I can say is that I'll be using this system from now on and would recommenend others to give it a go, especially if you have concerns about injury, time constraints or want to improve your perfomance.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Cheung on 3 Mar 2010
Format: Paperback
This is one of the first books I've ever bought on running, and the main reason I wanted to have a read is simply because of the title "Run Less, Run Faster".

I've been running competitively in races for a long time, and though only at amateur level it's something I very much enjoy and am passionate about. I've never followed any set training routine as such, when I was part of my Uni running club I would train 3 times a week with varying distances. Once I added some circuit training into my routine and some 5 a side footy my overall fitness definitely saw a vast improvement.

My two years in a running club saw me clock all my pb's over 5k, 10k, 10mile and Half-marathon distances. What I didn't really think about at the time was the variation my body got in different excercises helped to reach a very high level of fitness. In hindsight, I've realised what a difference it makes to the body.

What I'm getting at is the fact that this book promotes the idea of only doing 3 "quality" runs a week (tempo, track, long run) and a clear instruction to always have at least one rest day between runs. The additional cross-training (rowing/cycling/swimming) is to give the body a decent cardio work-out but using different muscle groups so your body can recover sufficiently.

Having tried the training programme out myself (I'm 5 weeks into it), I have to say that it is a refreshing approach to training. I'm never doing the same work-out twice, whether it be a run or cross-training. I joined a gym specifically so I could carry out the suggested cross-training sessions, and given the choice of 5/6 different work-outs there is always a different challenge to look forward to.
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