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RIIS
 
 

RIIS [Kindle Edition]

Bjarne Riis , Lars Steen Pedersen
3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)

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Review

''A very exciting and captivating read.'' B.T. ''It is very rare to find such a well told and honest biography as this one, where the main character fearlessly sacrifices himself.'' --Politiken, January 2012

''Essential reading for anybody who's interested in pro cycling.'' --Cycle Sport, May 2012

''Atmospheric, dark and sometimes shocking, this is a powerful and poignant insight into the troubled history of one of European cycling's most influential personalities.'' --Jeremy Whittle, correspondent to The Times, author of Bad Blood, April 2012

''A fascinating read. Riis's story is part that of cycling in the EPO-fuelled 90s, but it's also a very human tale of complex family relationships and insatiable personal ambition. The picture that emerges from his book will surprise many who think they know Bjarne Riis.'' --Richard Moore, author of Slaying the Badger, April 2012.

It is very rare to find such a well told and honest biography as this one, where the main character fearlessly sacrifices himself. Politiken, January 2012 "A very exciting and captivating read." --B.t.

''A fascinating read. Riis's story is part that of cycling in the EPO-fuelled 90s, but it's also a very human tale of complex family relationships and insatiable personal ambition. The picture that emerges from his book will surprise many who think they know Bjarne Riis.'' --Richard Moore, author of Slaying the Badger, April 2012.

'An important addition to the story of professional cycling.' --Bikeradar.com (October 2012)

''A fascinating read. Riis's story is part that of cycling in the EPO-fuelled 90s, but it's also a very human tale of complex family relationships and insatiable personal ambition. The picture that emerges from his book will surprise many who think they know Bjarne Riis.'' --Richard Moore, author of Slaying the Badger, April 2012.

Product Description

In 1996 Danish cyclist Bjarne Riis won the Tour de France. Eleven years later he called a press conference and confessed to taking EPO on the way to achieving the ultimate cycling triumph.

In RIIS, his sensational autobiography – already an acclaimed bestseller in Denmark and Germany – the notoriously private Dane bares his soul. From the shy eight-year-old who fell in love with cycling to the champion cyclist turned banned substance user, and finally the Team Saxo Bank owner determined to deliver a ‘clean’ Tour de France winner.

Brutally honest and as furiously fast-paced as one of his breakaways from the peloton, RIIS reveals a reflective man who doesn’t shy away from the darker episodes of his life and is resolved to learn from his mistakes.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 570 KB
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Vision Sports Publishing (21 May 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0085MG8S8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #131,209 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
By Yorkie
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If, like me, you have mixed feelings about Bjarne Riis from what you know of his past, but don't know him personally, expect this book to challenge those feelings. I finished his book with a different view of the man than I started with - my feelings are still mixed, but in a somewhat different way.

Firstly, putting the man to one side, the book itself. I'm judging the book by the standards of other cycling biographies and autobiographies - and I have read quite a few. I haven't given it five stars because it is a classic of modern literature; it isn't, but then that wasn't what I was looking for.

Instead I have given it a top rating simply because it is fascinating - pretty much throughout. Indeed the parts of many cycling biographies I find the least interesting (such as the early years of the rider's life) were very well written and some of the strongest parts of the book. Riis's early years as an amazingly committed child cyclist and then as a pro - when he really struggled to make it - are probably the least famous, yet most heroic, years of his life. The account of his doping is more detailed and more open than I expected (though he refrains from pointing the figure at others). His account as manager of numerous controversial and leading riders since - such as Jalabert, Sastre, Hamilton, the Schleck brothers and Contador - is also insightful (though perhaps not as much as it would be if more years had passed since events and he wasn't still very much involved in cycling).

It isn't perfect. For example, the last few chapters read as though they have been tacked on afterwards (and indeed maybe they were). But as they bring the book up-to-date to 2012, they were nonetheless very worthwhile.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars falling star(s) 28 Mar 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
i watched Riis as a rider and i felt he was a 5* professional. As he became a manager those same stars moved with him. Then they started to wane. By the time he had written this book i think it would be fair to mark him as 3.5. Since writing this book he's drifted further, and as a consequence a lot of the content of this same book has drifted with him - from being seen as honest prose to now having numerous questions raised against it. if it is all stages of light and dark for bjarne, right now he is definitely in the shadows. however, one day i do hope he sits to complete his memoirs, but this time with no half truths or clear fabrications. his life story is a fascinating one, and one that i can associate with on so very many levels....
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Same same same 3 July 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Not an incredibly inspiring book, No disrespect to Scandinavians but it portrays quite a cold personality in the way it is written. That may well have been the intent by the author when it was translated. Never was a fan of Riis in his racing days and this book hasnt changed my mind. It lacks the flair and entertainment that you get when you read David Millars book where he also swore he wouldnt dope, then did, then got caught, then relinquished titles, then made a come back. Still quite a good insight into one of the more private guys in the peleton.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Lying and Cheating, by Bjarne Riis 8 May 2013
By marty mcfly VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
Bjarne Riis' autobiography is the most delusional piece of fiction i have come across and the most distressing book any cycling fan is likely to have the misfortune to read. One suspects, also, that this is not the truth-telling exercise Riis thinks it is but more of the same lies that have dominated his professional and personal lives. Even though we all know Lance Armstrong cheated his way to all of his professional results, his autobiographies at least have value from the perspective of the human condition. Lance lied and cheated but he also suffered grave illness and his fight against that was remarkable. Riis has no such redeeming features.

Having lied and cheated his way through a professional cycling career Riis has gone onto a career in team management. He claims that doping as a rider when he did it was okay because everyone else did it. I suspect everyone but Bjarne Riis can see the falsehood and delusion at work in that perspective. Riis then claims that his goal was to run a clean team. On his watch the team included riders of the calibre of Tyler Hamilton, Ivan Basso, Frank Schleck, Bo Hamburger and Alberto Contador among others. Each of those riders has tested positive or served a doping ban (or some combination of both). Despite this Bjarne Riis thinks it is right and somehow good for the sport that he believes in their lies and delusions. Alberto Contador says he didn't do it and Riis believes him. Basso was only thinking about doping and Riis feels Basso is hard done by. Schleck denies doping, Riis feels he is a good guy. Hamilton is a nice guy. Hamburger delivers unbelievable results and Riis thinks his coaching, not dope, has made the difference.

Perhaps the worst lie of all is that Bjarne Riis loves cycling.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Brilliant Book 3 July 2012
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Here's a book written from the heart. If you love cycling, and good autobiogs, then you will absolutely love this book. From the first page to the last it is well written, flows brilliantly and is like a top class thriller - you can't put it down. Bjarne Riis, a victim of the doping era as 90% of the riders at that time were, tells it how it was. Some may scorn and scoff because he doesn't name names or point fingers, but that was not his task. His task was to tell the truth, show his regrets and also demonstrate his love for our sport. He fulfills those objectives admirably and I hold him in the highest esteem. The riders of the same (and slightly later) era who also cheated should also come clean and help prevent the scourge of cheating through doping to sully our sport. Riis' contribution is immense and I admire him for that. (By the way, we could contrast the translation of this book into English with the absolutely terrible translation of the Philippe Gilbert book which is so badly written that it is almost unreadable!)
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Unconvincing at times with conflicting information (read Tyler...
Unconvincing at times with conflicting information (read Tyler Hamilton's 'Secret Race') that leads one to the conclusion that for some it is hard to be completely truthful and... Read more
Published 4 months ago by Andrew Day
5.0 out of 5 stars good insight
Interesting perspective on the sport and slightly different take to the normal US/UK authors. Bjarne writes well and is pretty open about his part in the sport
Published 7 months ago by Tri Jules
2.0 out of 5 stars No remorse
Riis does not give the impression of genuine regret about his own doping. He says the right things, but the feeling does not seem to be behind his words. I may be wrong. Read more
Published 10 months ago by Mr. John R. Welsh
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent read
while this is a decent read on riding and running a cycling team I was a little disappointed that the doping subject seemed to be treated as an irrelevance and skirted around. Read more
Published 11 months ago by colin thompson
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book, interesting but could have been more honest.
Riis seems to be fairly honest an open about his doping, although a little late! There is little acknowledgment of doping during his managerial years. Read more
Published 15 months ago by Gemgems86
1.0 out of 5 stars Still not spitting in the soup
This book reeks of dishonesty. One personal confession about his own doping doesn't cover the fact that the rest of the book avoids suggesting that anyone else doped. Read more
Published 22 months ago by Adrian Gill
5.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening
An honest account of what is was like to be part of the "problem" of doping in the peloton and the struggle to face up to your shortcomings and try to be part of the solution. Read more
Published 22 months ago by IAN LAKEN
4.0 out of 5 stars Detailed book
I've been emerging myself in everything cycling for the last few years so this naturally came on my radar. Read more
Published 23 months ago by Supermurph
3.0 out of 5 stars RIIS by B.Riis
Story about doping in the Tour the France. May be one have to dope in order to win at one stage in the past. Read more
Published 23 months ago by Simon
4.0 out of 5 stars A worthy read
I was brought up on the Indurain era and thus watched Riis rise through the ranks. This is the gritty story of a complex character fighting for survival in a troubled sport. Read more
Published 24 months ago by AMW
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