£10.94 + £2.80 shipping
In stock. Sold by Discountdiscs-UK : Dispatched daily from the UK.

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£10.95
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Sold by: unclejohnsband
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Quills [VHS] [2001]


Price: £10.94
Only 1 left in stock.
2 new from £10.94 7 used from £2.00

Looking for Bargains?
Check out the DVD & Blu-ray Deals of the Week page to find this week's price-drops. Deals of the Week end on Sunday at 23:59.

Product details

  • Actors: Geoffrey Rush, Kate Winslet, Joaquin Phoenix, Michael Caine, Billie Whitelaw
  • Directors: Philip Kaufman
  • Writers: Doug Wright
  • Producers: Des McAnuff, Julia Chasman, Mark Huffam, Nick Wechsler, Peter Kaufman
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Fox
  • VHS Release Date: 29 Oct 2001
  • Run Time: 119 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005NOM4
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 277,595 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Imprisoned in the Charenton asylum near Paris, the Marquis de Sade (Geoffrey Rush) continues to produce his notorious erotic writings. When he finishes his latest novel, 'Justine', the young chambermaid Madeleine (Kate Winslet) smuggles it out to be published. The authorities are shocked by the book and demand that de Sade be silenced, but even after he has been tortured and his pens and papers taken away, the Marquis carries on the fight to express himself.

From Amazon.co.uk

With bedroom eyes and the mischievous smirk of an insatiable roué, Geoffrey Rush is a perfect choice to play the Marquis de Sade in Quills, adapted by Doug Wright from his own stage play and directed by Philip Kaufman. Imprisoned in France's Charenton asylum at the turn of the 18th century, de Sade is a stately court jester in dishevelled finery, and Rush imbues the role with the fierce urgency of a writer whose sexual fantasies are his sole remaining defence against repression and hypocrisy. Deprived of quill and ink, he writes with wine, then blood, then his own faeces--a descent into madness or an impassioned refusal to be silenced? Quills embraces freedom of expression ("such beauty, such abomination", as one character notes) while affirming that all freedoms have a price.

De Sade smuggles manuscripts out of Charenton with help from Madeleine (Kate Winslet), a virginal laundress who relishes de Sade's scandalous prose--a divine irony since she was taught to read by asylum abbé Coulmier (Joaquin Phoenix), whose desire for Madeleine is suppressed by Catholic propriety. The delicate dynamic of this trio is shattered by the arrival of Royer-Collard (Michael Caine, appearing somewhat comatose), a righteous hypocrite appointed to silence de Sade once and for all. It's all very engrossing as a piece of theatre (which it still is, despite Kaufman's elegant filming), and although Wright's literate dialogue limits de Sade to zesty ripostes and sneering perversity, Rush's intensity ensures that the marquis's plight is no laughing matter. Quills has a point, makes it without condescension and knows the difference between madness and passion . --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com --This text refers to the DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Kona TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 25 Sep 2005
Format: DVD
"Quills" tells of the last days of the infamous Marquis de Sade (Geoffrey Rush), who wrote erotic stories that shocked and delighted readers in 18th century France. He is living a rather privileged life as an inmate in an asylum run by a sympathetic cleric (Joaquin Phoenix), where he produces his plays for the nobility. Sade is allowed to write, but not to publish; however, a young laundry maid (Kate Winslet) admires him and smuggles his work out of the asylum. The Emperor, Napoleon, dislikes his books and orders that Sade be stopped once and for all. Sade's paper, ink, and quills are confiscated, and the cruel Dr. Royer-Collard (Michael Caine) is sent to oversee the asylum.
The dialogue is literate and elegant and the acting is first-rate. Rush is dazzlingly flamboyant, Winslet is winsome and sweet, Phoenix is noble and earnest, and Caine is despicably cruel. The story and the brutal way it is presented, however, were repellant to me, and I found it difficult to watch. If cruelty offends you, you probably won't like "Quills."
Kona
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Charles Vasey TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 April 2012
Format: DVD
This is a grim (very fictional) piece dwelling on the lowest common denominators of life enlightened by some excellent acting. In the service of a good story the Marquis de Sade is transformed from the eponymous sadist into the Hugh Hefner of the Napoleonic era; a mixture of Dexter and a Donald McGill postcard. Played by Geoffrey Rush the Marquis has all the best lines though Joaquin Phoenix mounts (as the Marquis might say) a gallant rearguard action. Michael Caine is marvellously horrible, in an entirely reasonable fashion, as the nasty doctor and Kate Winslet will lead many a young man astray. There is even room for Vampire Bill Compton. The oscillation from a Georges Feydeau farce to a Hannibal Lector sequel is perhaps the oddest feature of the film; although, as, once again, the Marquis might say, it is just a play.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By BPR on 5 Jan 2012
Format: DVD
Many people give Shakespeare in Love credit as Geoffrey Rush's best role but I have wondered on occasion if these people had seen the magnificent Quills in which he plays the Marquis de Sade in an insane asylum extremely well. He is surrounded by a great supporting cast including Michael Caine, Kate Winslet and Joaquin Phoenix all putting in brilliant performances. The screenplay by Doug Wright is very well written and packs a punch when required, managing to give all the characters the right amount of development throughout. The most interesting aspect for me was the 'friendship' between the Marquis de Sade and Abbe (Joaquim Phoenix), especially as they are different in the extremes in the fact that Abbe has chosen a life of chastity and the Marquis de Sade writes explicit manuscripts and implores people to open up to their sexual thoughts. The ending was excellent also. If you're a fan of well-written, well-acted period films, Quills is highly recommended. 4.5/5
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Aug 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Quills is an amazing feast of actors, and has a great story line.
GEOFFREY RUSH ("Shine", "House on Haunted Hill", "Les Misérables, and some more) woes, frightens, shocks and seduces you with his absolutly amazing portrayl as the eccentric, seductive Marquis de Sade. Never has an actor excelled like this, and maybe this is his finest hour.
KATE WINSLET ("Titantic") also amazes with her stunning performance as Madeline, the washerwoman who befriends the Marquis and smuggles his erotic fiction from the aslyum.
JOAQUIN PHOENIX ("Gladiator") is equally stunning with his portral of the Abbé Coulmier, the priest who tries to reform the Marquis.
MICHAEL CAINE is amazing in his part of Dr. Antoine Royer-Collard -- the doctor who's harsh methods and style make the Marquis look sane. He excells as the doctor, sent by the King, to "silence" the Marquis' writing.
"Quills" is an amazingly written tale about censorship. The film is sexy, funny and tragic at the same time. This film is one to watch.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By schumann_bg TOP 100 REVIEWER on 23 May 2014
Format: DVD
Quills is based more on fantasy than fact, it seems, keeping only the basic outline of who the characters were. However the screenplay is exceptionally good and it could be argued that it is a particularly outstanding example of fictionalised biography, getting the flavour of the life and the meaning of the work better than a more literal narrative would. The vividness of Sade's writing is there - in actual excerpts, which have a comic element, the obscenity is so outlandish, and so relished as delivered by Goeffrey Rush's fruity tone. Certainly the chambermaid Madeleine (Kate Winslet) can't get enough of it, nor the clamouring public. The rude energy of the texts is undeniable, and Madeleine does make the point that enjoying the books enables her to be better in life. The priest Abbe Coulmier (a tender, tormented Joaquin Phoenix) has a fascinating role, the most torn of all the characters between the spiritual path, kindness towards the prisoner and love for Madeleine, who seems to have a special admiration for the Marquis and is smuggling his works out of Charenton asylum for publication. He simply will not be silenced. The film hardly moves outside the asylum and it is often quite unpleasant with vicious cruelty on show. Nevertheless this is one film where it is justified and you can't help feeling Sade would have liked the way his character has the courage of his convictions to the very end, fighting a constant psychological duel with Coulmier. The end of the film is a stroke of genius, but it is not to be given away. At all events, it is a dazzling achievement, brilliantly acted by the three performers mentioned above (particularly Rush) and Michael Caine also, not forgetting the wily, saucy architect Prouix, played by Stephen Moyer, who most amusingly seduces a teenage forced bride who is only able to take advantage of his interest because she has primed herself in Sade's writings.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback