Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Quentin Durward (World's Classics) Paperback – 5 Nov 1992


See all 83 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 5 Nov 1992
£12.00 £7.18
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£9.85


Free One-Day Delivery for six months with Amazon Student


Product details

  • Paperback: 606 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks; New edition edition (5 Nov. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192826581
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192826589
  • Product Dimensions: 11.8 x 2.7 x 18.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,213,130 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Willl certainly be the definitive scholarly edition of Scott for the foreseeable future. The notes and emendation lists ! evince years of thorough, diligent research into manuscripts, editions, sources, references, and allusions. The information will give the serious reader inestimable help in understanding Scott. Alexander and Wood give us a Quentin Durward that corresponds to no previous version of the novel. It is a social text for our moment in time which, given the publication history of the Waverley Novels, is eminently appropriate. This is the fifth volume of the EEWN to be edited by J. H. Alexander. In each the scholarly apparatus has been superb, and this edition of Quentin Durward is no exception, The Explanatory Notes, Historical Notes, Glossary, Map and Essay on the Text make this an indispensable work. For the study of Scott's first fictional foray on to the European continent. The Edinburgh Edition respects Scott the artist by 'restoring' versions of the novels that are not quite what his first readers saw. Indeed, it returns to manuscripts that the printers never handled, as Scott's fiction before 1827 was transcribed before it reached the printshop. Each volume of the Edinburgh edition presents an uncluttered text of one work, followed by an Essay on the Text by the editor of the work, a list of the emendations that have been made to the first edition, explanatory notes and a glossary ! The editorial essays are histories of the respective texts. Some of them are almost 100 pages long; when they are put together they constitute a fascinating and lucid account of Scott's methods of compostion and his financial manoeuvres. This edition is for anyone who takes Scott seriously. Willl certainly be the definitive scholarly edition of Scott for the foreseeable future. The notes and emendation lists ! evince years of thorough, diligent research into manuscripts, editions, sources, references, and allusions. The information will give the serious reader inestimable help in understanding Scott. Alexander and Wood give us a Quentin Durward that corresponds to no previous version of the novel. It is a social text for our moment in time which, given the publication history of the Waverley Novels, is eminently appropriate. This is the fifth volume of the EEWN to be edited by J. H. Alexander. In each the scholarly apparatus has been superb, and this edition of Quentin Durward is no exception, The Explanatory Notes, Historical Notes, Glossary, Map and Essay on the Text make this an indispensable work. For the study of Scott's first fictional foray on to the European continent. The Edinburgh Edition respects Scott the artist by 'restoring' versions of the novels that are not quite what his first readers saw. Indeed, it returns to manuscripts that the printers never handled, as Scott's fiction before 1827 was transcribed before it reached the printshop. Each volume of the Edinburgh edition presents an uncluttered text of one work, followed by an Essay on the Text by the editor of the work, a list of the emendations that have been made to the first edition, explanatory notes and a glossary ! The editorial essays are histories of the respective texts. Some of them are almost 100 pages long; when they are put together they constitute a fascinating and lucid account of Scott's methods of compostion and his financial manoeuvres. This edition is for anyone who takes Scott seriously. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

J. H. Alexander is Reader Emeritus in English at the University of Aberdeen. G A M Wood was formerly Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Stirling. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
WHEN HONEST Dogberry sums up and recites all the claims which he had to respectability, and which, as he opined, ought to have exempted him from the injurious appellation conferred on him by Master Gentleman Conrade, it is remarkable that he lays not more  Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Barty Literati on 8 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback
A REVIEW OF `QUENTIN DURWARD' by SIR WALTER SCOTT

`Quentin Durward' (1823) is an expertly-structured historical adventure story, set in late 15th century France. However, owing to its characterisation, central premise and narrative style, it failed to engage and satisfy this reader as many superficially similar novels (such as `The Three Musketeers' and `The Hunchback of Notre Dame'*) have done. Indeed, the current lack of an in-print version of `Quentin Durward' from a major publisher suggests that it is a `classic' that is not wearing wonderfully well.

The story takes place in 1482, during a period of intense rivalry between King Louis XI of France and Charles, Duke of Burgundy. Amidst this political in-fighting, young Scottish archer, Durward is assigned by Louis to escort the beautiful Countess of Croye to the safety that can be offered by the Bishop of Liege. However, little does our hero realise that the Countess is a pawn in Louis's power-struggle and that a trap has been set in which she is to be ambushed by the bloodthirsty rebel, William de la Marck. Her forced marriage to the villain will see the balance of power between France and Burgundy swing decisively in the king's favour. However, events do not unfold according to these treacherous plans...

On the surface, `Quentin Durward' contains the essential elements of a stirring period romp: a dashing young hero keen to find fame and fortune, a damsel in distress and some notable set-pieces including a daring rescue from a besieged castle.

However, `Quentin Durward' ultimately tests the reader's perseverance. Much of this is due to the insipid characterisation of its titular hero. Durward is one of the least interesting leading men I can recall.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Excellent historical fiction with rich characterization 25 Jan. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Quentin Durward is good reading, right up (almost) to the very end. It's excellent historical fiction with very rich characterization, especially of Louis XI. Excellent, that is, except for the women. While two of the minor female characters are interesting, the female lead is as dull as dishwater. My real complaint is that the ending is bungled. After the tremendous buildup full of exciting action and convincing sets, you turn the page and...it's just over! Misses the crecendo and the denoument. Still, I enjoyed it, and recommend checking it out of the library, as I did.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
One of Scott's finest 13 Dec. 2002
By "sfoster29" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I read this novel forty years ago in the Modern Library edition and I am amazed that it is out of print except in expensive library editions. It is one of Scott's finest novels, full of action and with a fine portrait of King Louis. It was the first novel to use a gypsy as a character. It was made into a movie in the 1950's. Scott of one of the most neglected geniuses in literature and the world is the poorer for it.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Timeless Classic for Generations 12 April 2007
By Joseph N. Davis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
When I was 13, I asked my father what his favorite book was when he was my age. He told me "Quentin Durward". The next time we were in a bookstore together, I found a paperback copy of this book and bought it...for 75 cents! When I read this book, I entered the medieval world of knights, kings, lovely medieval ladies, and chivalry. I later learned that Quentin Durward is about fighting to preserve moral order in a changing world. What book could be more relevant today? I just bought this book for my 13 year old son, and he has it on his list of books to read this summer. The generations in my family will be connected by this book and the themes it addresses.

p.s. When going through my father's library, I discovered the old copy my father had read. It had his father's name written on the first page, and his grandmother's name on a bookplate inside the front cover!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Somewhat Borgesian 21 Nov. 2005
By R. Nemirow - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the first Sir Walter Scott novel I've read since 1975. I was struck by how modern -- or even post-modern -- its structure is. For one thing, the novel is a narrated by fictitious narrator named Sir Walter Scott, honest, who stumbles into a private library salvaged from pre-revolutionary France; for another, its annotations reference sources which may or may not exist, but which the fictitious narrator claims he read in the private library referenced above. Further, with the exception of the heroine (dish-water dull, I agree), the characters all behave as modern people would. Yet, as far as I can tell, Borges never wrote about Sir Walter Scott. Go figure.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A really good historical novel 27 Jan. 2012
By Geoff Puterbaugh - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I believe that Sir Walter Scott was the man who invented the historical novel, and they say that this is one of his finest efforts. Certainly, it puts a lot of modern fiction into the shade, especially the sort of modern novel which amounts to prolonged gazing at one's own navel. (I have The Sense of an Ending (Borzoi Books) in mind...)

But this is heresy! How can you possibly prefer clunky old Walter Scott (SO unfashionable!) to the winner of the Man Booker Prize (SO fashionable!). My only answer is that literary reputations come, and literary reputations go. Time was, when Sir Walter Scott was one of the best-read authors in history, but his reputation took a serious dive when "real writers" such as Ezra Pound and James Joyce came along.

Nevertheless, "Quentin Durward" is very good reading. Not only is it a good story, you will actually gain some valuable knowledge about history, in particular the French king Louis XI, and the Duke of Burgundy.

How about the style? Well, when I was in 8th grade I decided it was impenetrable, even yucky. But the decades passed (as they will) and now the style offers no impediment whatsoever.

One very refreshing thing is that Quentin Durward is a Complete Pre-Feminist Male Hero. He is strong, valiant, a terrifying fighter, and extremely good-looking into the bargain. He respects women, and shows them every courtesy; in fact, at the end of the novel he almost surrenders his greatest love to rescue a Flemish girl who has been captured by a gang of soldiers with no good intentions. On top of that, he is nobly born, and expects that others treat him accordingly, mostly because he conducts himself according to a strict code of nobility.

And all of these things are gone, gone with the wind -- if they ever really existed.

I'm looking forward to reading more from this author, especially since you can get his complete works for the Kindle for almost nothing. :-)
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback