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Pyramid Paperback – 7 Dec 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 436 pages
  • Publisher: Pan (7 Dec. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330452118
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330452113
  • Product Dimensions: 11.4 x 2.8 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (77 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 768,494 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

'And with the end of the world in balance, too,there's enough colour and action here to brighten up skint nights...'
-- Daily Sport(Manchester)

'You will need your wits about you when you read this book...in a race against time' -- Peterborough Evening Telegraph

Book Description

In case I don’t return. Eureka 40 10 4 400 30 9 30 70 100 5 200 30 10 40 1 80 5 100 400 40 10 50 10 200 300 100 8 70 9 1 50 300 10 20 800 10 300 10 200 0051172543672 An eminent Oxford professor is murdered – but the authorities are calling it a suicide. Beautiful young don Catherine Donovan refuses to believe the official verdict – especially after she receives a cryptic note sent just before the professor’s death, along with a collection of priceless antique maps. Teaming up with classicist James Rutherford, she embarks on a journey which takes them from the dreaming spires of Oxford to the ancient wonders of Peru and Egypt. With a shadowy organization determined to stop them, can Catherine and James unlock the mystery of the ancients before they become the killers’ next victims? And can it really be possible that these clues are warning of an imminent cataclysm – one that puts even more than their lives in peril?

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Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Heather on 1 July 2010
Format: Paperback
All I can say about this book is I'm glad I got it out of the library and didn't actually pay any money for it.

The main characters were shallow and the dialogue was awful. The "ground-breaking" discoveries they kept making were laughably puerile and the whole thing left me not really caring what happened in the end. I won't be buying his next book either!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Flipper on 21 Jan. 2008
Format: Paperback
The writer introduces us to theories that are launched nowadays by popular pseudo scientists, telling us of ancient civilisations in places we would never suspect them, all based on coincidences and misinterpretation of ancient sources like the Piri Reis Map. Real scientists can tell you it's pure imagination.
Anyway, the book is quite readable. One of the other reviewers mentioned the Famous Five and I think that's a good comparison; it reads like the books I used to read when I was 13. Two-dimensional characters, action scenes that are easy to follow, it's all there. That's what I give the two stars for.
Unfortunately I have been to Peru and Bolivia myself and the writer Tom Martin clearly hasn't. The mistakes in describing the scenes in Cuzco, Machu Picchu, Tiahuanaco and Lake Titicaca are so numerous, I don't know where to start. A few examples: Coricancha is not the same place as Cuzco Cathedral, it's a whole different building. The central square in Cuzco is called Plaza de Armas, not Plaza de los Almabos. He describes the train ride to Machu Picchu as going 'up the slope' while approaching the station near the ruins. Actually, most of the train ride to Machu Picchu follows the Urubamba River DOWNstream; Machu Picchu is much lower in altitude than Cuzco. And once you leave the train you're at the bottom of the valley, so there is no river hundreds of yards deep below; you take the bus up to the ruins. And finally: Tiahuanaco (or Tiwanaku, as it's also spelled) is located in Bolivia, not in Peru. It is near Lake Titicaca, which is not above the treeline, as the author suggests. On the banks of the lake farmers grow crops, so it's not as barren as you might think when you read the book.
So my conclusion is: read it as an adventure novel, but don't check the details because most of them are wrong.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. Green TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Jan. 2008
Format: Paperback
Let me start by saying that Pyramid is not a good book by any stretch of the imagination. For a start its badly written, with a leaden style that doesn't flow, is full of repetitious descriptives (I lost count of the times someone expressed emotion via the look on their face) and lacks any real depth or atmosphere. Characterisation is almost completely non-existent, with both leads being wholly one dimensional and the supporting cast either caricatures or nameless plot devices. The pacing is all over the places; not helped by the need to include vast chunks of exposition. The plot is really nothing more than a frame on which the author can hang the theories he wishes to espouse. The whole race against time/pursuit by hidden enemies element never really gets airborne (the book must feature the most incompetent hidden cabal in literary history), it never feels like our heroes are in any real danger, the various plots & conspiracies on display feel half-baked and opaque and the whole thing fizzles out in a rather anticlimatic way. Oh and the book is in dire need of a good editor (for example there is no way anyone could climb inside any variant of the Apache helicopter and find themselves in a sixty foot long cabin. The Apache is doesn't have a cabin and isn't that big).

So if its so irredeemably bad why give it three stars you may well ask. Well one star is the Amazon minimum and is therefore simply for existing as a book. The second star is for the theories the book posits. Whilst none of them are new Tom Martin does manage to explain them and draw them together clearly and concisely whilst at the same time making them interesting (albeit at the expense of the narrative flow and characterisation).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By freedomrulesok on 21 May 2009
Format: Paperback
What starts off with an interesting premise - a revered map of 1513 that seems to point to an earler, more intelligent civilisation - then goes off the ropes with poor dialogue, a lack of cliff hangers or excitement, too interested in explaining story and myth at the expense of the actual (unbelievable) story.

Disappointing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By G. Anderson on 26 Sept. 2008
Format: Paperback
The story started well and the plot was pretty intense to begin with. Although it didn't last long. The plot seemed to be over in just a couple of chapters. I also felt the dialogue was witten in a somewhat unnatural way. Some of the sentences had me shaking my head and i'm no best selling novellist!

I too was bamboozled by the Catherine / Rutherford naming convention.

As the book progressed I had the distinct feeling that the author was beginning to rush things. The ending was indeed a bit of a let-down. It all seemed to be over in an instant in one big Crash, Bang, Wallop... Happy ever after...

Having said all this. This type of storyline does interest me and I will be reading his next novel "Kingdom", which is due for release in January 2009.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TheEmperor on 24 Dec. 2007
Format: Paperback
The premise of the novel is mostly recycled from one of the many elements in 'Decipher' (Stel Pavlou), only without character development, subplots, in depth explanation, cohesion, and a climax.
The writing: unnatural dialogue, the use of characters to get points across is amateurish (Catherine: 'what? you mean to say that...' is overly used), some cheesy scenes, glossed over scenes. The ending was awful, a real anticlimax, seriously.
Despite all this, it is an enjoyable story, not too heavy, but not exactly childish. It's definitely along the lines of my favourite type of fiction, which is why it gets a 3, just for effort.

This novel had a lot of potential, i only wish this wasn't his first time writing.
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