£7.19
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £1.80 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £1.23
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Put Me Back On My Bike: In Search of Tom Simpson (Yellow Jersey Cycling Classics) Paperback – 1 May 2014


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.19
£4.25 £4.24

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • From mountain bikes to cycle computers, find 1000s of products in our bikes store.


Frequently Bought Together

Put Me Back On My Bike: In Search of Tom Simpson (Yellow Jersey Cycling Classics) + Slaying the Badger: LeMond, Hinault and the Greatest Ever Tour de France (Yellow Jersey Cycling Classics) + How I Won the Yellow Jumper: Dispatches from the Tour de France
Price For All Three: £21.57

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £1.23
Trade in Put Me Back On My Bike: In Search of Tom Simpson (Yellow Jersey Cycling Classics) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £1.23, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Yellow Jersey (1 May 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224092391
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224092395
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 13.3 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 112,070 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

William Fotheringham writes for the Guardian and Observer on cycling and rugby. He is the author of a biography of Tom Simpson, Put Me Back On My Bike, which was acclaimed by Vélo magazine as 'the best cycling biography ever written' and Roule Britannia: A History of Britons in the Tour de France.

Product Description

Review

"The best cycling biography ever written" (Velo)

"An intelligent, perceptive portrait" (Guardian)

"A beautiful explanation of why Simpson's legend still exerts such a powerful hold" (Sunday Times)

"An enjoyable, clear-eyed biography" (Times Literary Supplement)

"The definitive story of Britain’s greatest ever cyclist" (Cycle Sport)

Book Description

The book the cycling world has been waiting for. A definitive account of the life of Britain's greatest cyclist - Tom Simpson.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By D. Harvey-George on 28 May 2004
Format: Paperback
A couple of weeks ago I bumped into a couple of German girls cycling up to l'Alpe d'Huez. We finished our 'stage' and stopped for a chat. Why were they here? To ride in the tire tracks of Lance Armstrong they said. Where next? Mont Ventoux of course, they were making a pilgrimage to the Simpson memorial.
The ghostly newsreel footage of Simpson zig-zaging close to the summit of the Ventoux on that fateful July day in 1967 haunt many a cyclist and the memorial has become as much a place of worship as the grave of Jim Morrison in Paris. Simpson's story has a great allure, plucky but flawed Brit battling against the odds in an ultimately tragic endeavor.
Fotheringham's book does much to capture the essence of the man but finally it seems too distant. Although well researched, and who better to do the job, there are ultimately not enough revelations to satisfy. Short of pulling a smoking gun out of the archives of the Avignon prefecture the book isn't going to have the shocking general impact of Sophie Anquetil's recently published biography of her father Jacques (Pour l'amour de Jacques, ISBN:2246669618), a rival of Simpson's.
A couple of points which Fotheringham seemed to miss. He discusses (and rejects) the possibility that transporting Simpson in the helicopter killed him as he was lifted high into the air. The incident occured at around 2000 meters, not a great height and it is doubtful if the helicoper gained much more height transporting Simpson. It is standard practise for mountain rescues to keep close to the ground and lose height and the newsreel seems to show the helicopter doing exactly this. It also appears in one of the photos in the book that Simpson's right thigh is coated in Iodine possibly after an injection of what... adrenalin?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By William Best on 8 Sep 2002
Format: Hardcover
Although only twelve years old at the time, I still vividly remember seeing the news of Tom Simpson's death on TV. This is strange because I wasn't a cycling fan and I can't remember seeing the TV news of any of the other historic events of the time like JFK being shot (and we're all suppossed to remember where we were when this happened), Luther King's death, Perfumo, or even the man on the moon. So why did Tom Simpson stick in my mind like nothing else? I didn't really know but this book seemed to be to a must read to try and find out. I now know. Fotheringham's excellent account of the life (and most importantly - the times) of Tom Simpson is an excellent account. It is incredibly well researched, engrossing, entertaining and yet onbjective and dispassionate. This books captures the strengths and the flaws in Simpson's character but left me with a fascination of the man and answered my question as to why his death has stuck in my mind for so long. This is probably the best biography I have ever read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
It is hard to be triumphant about a book which is centered on a tragedy - the death of Tom Simpson while struggling up Mont Ventoux in the Tour de France. However you look at the accident - naiveté or ignorance, drug abuse, a willful disregard of personal safety, someone who refused to give up or someone attempting to do what was expected and demanded, the need to succeed at all costs or the fear of failure; his death remains a tragedy.

As with Princess Diana, it was his death which defined the life of Simpson, and leaves behind big questions - what price the spectacle (the media/) we demand from our sporting heroes, and drug-use in sport.

Like a detective, the author has pieced together the life of Simpson from records and eye-witness accounts. It is done with respect, but unlike others who would prefer to gloss over certain facts this feels like a well-balanced account. There is no denying the truth is uncomfortable (and there is something ghoulish in how the cameras keep rolling), but then the lies and cover-ups have fueled a controversy less than dignified.

The events of the day are first covered in detail in Chapter 2, so I am not sure what sequence the book follows, if any. In fact the chapters could be read at random without any great loss. (I am not sure if this amounts to a criticism or not, certainly not a major one!) Between chapters are short press extracts recording some of Simpson's better days - they give a sense of just how extraordinary an athlete Simpson was and the kind of hero-worship he engendered.

However, the important work of the author was in what he could capture of Simpson's personality and his world. He allows the story to emerge, and the story is bigger than the book - as raw feelings 40 years on and a memorial turning into a shrine clearly demonstrate.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By stein on 3 Nov 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The start of the book is promising and it picks up again in the last three chapters. Yet, the middle was more like regurgitating the "same story". I learned a lot about Tom Simpson and about pro-cycling in the late 50's and 60's - and about the use of drugs. I found the story too "British". Nonetheless, I will probably make my pilgrimage to Mt Ventoux - and do like his daughter - cycle up - and think of Giants.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Sep 2003
Format: Hardcover
Very very good if a little sad. After reading it you get that feeling I must go to the Ventoux.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback