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Push The Sky Away


Price: £12.41 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Frequently Bought Together

Push The Sky Away + The Boatman's Call + Abattoir Blues / The Lyre Of Orpheus
Price For All Three: £25.94

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Product details

  • Audio CD (18 Feb. 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Bad Seed Ltd
  • ASIN: B00AFOS6P2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (154 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,451 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. We No Who U R 4:04£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Wide Lovely Eyes 3:40£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Water's Edge 3:49£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Jubilee Street 6:36£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Mermaids 3:49£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. We Real Cool 4:18£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Finishing Jubilee Street 4:28£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Higgs Boson Blues 7:50£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Push the Sky Away 4:07£0.99  Buy MP3 

Product Description

Product Description

At the heart of Push the Sky Away is a naturalism and warmth that makes it the most subtly beautiful of all the Bad Seeds albums. The contemporary settings of myths, and the cultural references that have time-stamped Nick's songs of the twenty-first century mist lightly through details drawn from the life he observed around his seaside home, through the tall windows on the album's mysterious and ambiguous cover. The songs on this album took form in a modest notebook with shellac covers over the course of almost a year. The notebook is a treasured analogue artefact but the internet is equally important to Nick: Googling curiosities, being entranced by exotic Wikipedia entries "whether they're true or not". These songs convey how on the internet profoundly significant events, momentary fads and mystically-tinged absurdities sit side-by-side and question how we might recognise and assign weight to what's genuinely important. The album has a clarity and sweet strangeness that's built upon the refusal to accept limitations, whether they be the traditional uses and sounds of musical instruments, lyric styles, or diminished spiritual horizons. It's not always apparent what instruments the band is playing: they may be traditional musical instruments but other sounds are clearly generated by objects unrelated to musical instruments. What's being created is a collective musical language that's rich and complex. "Well, if I were to use that threadbare metaphor of albums being like children, then Push The Sky Away is the ghost-baby in the incubator and Warren's loops are its tiny, trembling heart-beat." - Nick Cave.

BBC Review

A couple of years after 2004’s double-album Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus, Nick Cave and various Bad Seeds turned to a fledgling project they named Grinderman as a means of escaping the weight and expectation of their established act.

Via some charged, deranged rock’n’roll, it accomplished exactly what its architects intended, enabling them to come on strong with 2008’s acclaimed Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!! and clear the palette for Push the Sky Away, their 15th studio album.

The product of a newly reconfigured Bad Seeds (their first album without founding member Mick Harvey, who left in 2009), Cave employs the metaphor of albums as children in its press release, likening it to “the ghost-baby in the incubator” wherein “Warren [Ellis]’s loops are its tiny, trembling heart-beat”.

It is certainly a far stranger, subtler record than that last Bad Seeds outing. And in its own way this is every bit as fierce and uncompromising as both Grinderman LPs.

Lead single We No Who U R sets the template: a hymnal slow-burner replete with elemental imagery, it falls somewhere between simmering menace and odd, enchanting beauty. Over the following songs, Cave and his cohorts revel in this dichotomy.

Wide Lovely Eyes and We Real Cool are set against ominously rumbling guitar and bass respectively; strings, piano and backing vocals have to force their way upward in the mix to let in a little light, the ensuing interplay between tension and release exquisitely wrought.

“Wikipedia is heaven / When you don’t want to remember no more,” sighs Cave at one point, referencing the forays around arcane corners of the internet that influenced his songwriting.

These come to the fore in Higgs Boson Blues, a psychotropic eight-minute odyssey that finds him dwelling on everything from nightmarish depictions of Lucifer and disease-carrying missionaries to Miley Cyrus.

The record closes with its title track, a call-to-arms both hushed and bracing in turn. “Some people say it’s just rock and roll / Oh, but it gets you right down to your soul / You’ve gotta keep on pushing,” Cave asserts.

It becomes increasingly evident the song is aimed at himself as much as anyone, on an LP as weighty, compelling and brilliant as The Bad Seeds have ever produced.

--James Skinner

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 76 people found the following review helpful By A. Delahunty on 18 Feb. 2013
Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
This has been a much-anticipated album for many people, myself included. The Grinderman project Nick Cave has been working on has been far louder than the recent Bad Seeds albums, and there were rumours that this album would be a good deal quieter than previous Bad Seeds offerings. The release of the first track - We No Who U R - seemed to indicate that was indeed the case. But would it still be a Nick Cave album as we know and love them?

This is a highly introspective album, and seems to come from a different place than the last Bad Seeds outing "Dig!!! Lazarus Dig!!!" from 2008. It certainly is a good deal quieter in that there are no clearly identifiable rock tracks, but it is definitely a Nick Cave album. The melancholy comes through in every track, and Nick's voice is as mournful as ever. I hate to draw comparisons with other artists, but it does remind me in tone of the classic Scott Walker albums - the same poetry, the same swooping arrangements, the same truly heart-felt emotion which comes over through the speakers. Comparisons aside however, this seems to me an album in which Nick has the same passion for what he does, but does it in a much calmer way.

It will put some fans off, I know, and it will certainly divide the music press. It's not what we've heard from Nick in a while - perhaps elements of The Boatman's Call - and some people will think this is a bad thing, but it is for me one of the most lovely things I have heard for some time. Standout tracks are Higgs Boson Blues, Water's Edge, and Jubilee Street (especially Jubilee Street - truly a wonderful song), and the whole thing is just a brilliant collection - play it through headphones without distractions, and just listen intently to what is passing into your ears.
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44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Red on Black TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 Feb. 2013
Format: Audio CD
Nick Cave has always been about wild contrasts. Recall that after the brutal "Murder Ballads" came the most beautiful Bad Seeds record, the gorgeously meditative "Boatman's Call". Setting aside the naked aggression of the Grinderman records, the Bad Seeds last full album was 2008's electrifying whacked out blues of "Dig Lazarus Dig" so there is a quiet inevitably that the great man will take a tangential turn. Coming in the shape of the 15th studio album by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, "Push the sky away" sees him return with a melancholy beast that is contemplative and measured. This is not the fiery Nick Cave but the one who reflects on the human condition and uses the sea as a metaphor for a cast of subjects leading to the production of a stunning album which is as quietly powerful has any thing they have done to date.

The departure of Mick Harvey has impacted and into the vacuum he has left steps Cave's soundtrack collaborator Warren Ellis, whose slow instrumentation and ghostly keyboard parts establish an ominous often soured mood. The nine songs here range from the gently rolling "We no who U R" which oozes a sultry almost Portishead style atmosphere to the albums absolute standout of the near eight minute "Higgs Boson Blues" so wasted it could have be happily located within the grooves of Neil Young's "On the Beach". It's a burningly strung out powerhouse saga that name checks an eclectic list that includes Robert Johnson, the Lorraine Motel where Martin Luther King was shot in Memphis, Hannah Montana and Milly Cyrus. When at one point Cave sings "Well here comes Lucifer/With his canon law, And a hundred black babies runnin' from his genocidal jaw/He got the real killer groove" it is almost scary.
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By paul gilronan on 23 Feb. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I know there are a lot of lifelong Nick Cave fans giving mixed reviews on here and in that respect I must be impartial. I have 'dabbled' with his music since 'Let Love In' came out and have been blown away by many of his tunes but never a full LP. So I write this review as a fan of music in general. I like all types of music regardless of genre...if the music is good then don't put a label on it, great music is great music. Which brings me to 'Push The Sky Away'...I heard Nick Cave had a new album out and thought I'd give it a go. To be honest I have just been waiting for the new Bowie album and was passing the time giving it a listen. I tried 'Jubilee Street' first which blew me away so streamed the LP. I kept returning to 'Jubilee Street' because it haunted me. After listening to the album in full I placed my order for the vinyl and since then it has been on heavy rotation. Not only (mark my words) will this be the album of 2013 at the end of year polls but it is simply one of the best albums I have ever heard by Nick Cave or anybody. Remember, I have never been a huge Nick Cave fan, but now in 2013 I am returning to his back catalogue on the strength of this album alone. A STONE COLD CLASSIC!!!!!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael on 13 Mar. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Album number 15 for the band and nearly five years from the fantastic Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!! With the Grinderman side project taking up some time for the members of the Bad Seeds as well as some work on the Lawless soundtrack it is time to get back to the main project.

This album is a years worth or writing by the band with Cave gathering influences form such diverse places as Wikipedia and simply Google searching. The lyrics were written into a notebook that Cave kept. All ideas came from Cave and handing these over to the band the resulting music is made. A simple and effective way to make an album.

Album opener "We No Who 'U 'R" takes you to a comfortable Seeds style. The song title does suggest some darkening moods and it is obvious from the start of the song. Fading out into "Wide Lovely Eyes" there are very little instruments on this track just piano and what seems to be muted guitar or some other stringed instrument. The song reminds me of looking at old photographs and revisiting where they were taken.

Finding some influence from Grinderman in track three "Water's Edge" simply has some viola but the first trace of a melody and minimal you look forward to it so much you miss it. Cave sounds like he has his notebook right there and is taking lyrics at random. Not so much from different songs but in another order. "Jubilee Street" has been heard before by me and it is a great song. But it was a little puzzling back then, now it fits in so well. The music now flows happily with textures taking on a near Swans style. Melody comes back in here and it is repetitive but that is where when first listening you see why it is track four now. Going onto a more epic style of ending it is classic Seeds.
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