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Punishermax: Homeless Hardcover – 25 Apr 2012


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 120 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel (25 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785152105
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785152101
  • Product Dimensions: 18.4 x 1.3 x 26.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 504,632 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER on 27 April 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Frank starts the book with no guns and no hideouts. He has to fight his way to Wilson Fisk, aka the Kingpin, from the lowliest drug dealers up, all of whom feel that due to his recent struggles with Bullseye and his incarceration at Rykers, that they can take him. Throw in the deadly Elektra Natchios, and Frank is fighting uphill the entire book, taking beating after beating, until the bloody end.

I think what I like best about Jason Aaron's version of "The Punisher" is that he makes him so dark and tragic a figure that you completely dissociate him from the brightly coloured pageantry and pure wonder of the rest of the Marvel Universe. Aaron's Frank Castle is a hollow man, death on his feet, looking to die but pathologically unable to because of his bleak "mission". He's a hero you care about but definitely don't want to be.

Jason Aaron and Steve Dillon have created an incredible story of the Punisher that's never been fully explained before. What he did after the war, the psychology behind his actions and a black hearted theory behind why he became who he became, what little there was left of the man he was in the end, and of course how he died. I'll miss the series because Aaron was one of the few writers who really understood the character and gave him the white-hot intensity the stories of the Punisher demands, he really lived up to the "MAX" label in the title.

The Punisher's final battle is pitch perfect from start to end, taking down street gangs, Bullseye, Elektra, and finally Kingpin. It's epic and bloody and is a fitting end to the eternal soldier. Nick Fury narrates the final chapter, refusing to give Frank a eulogy that celebrates his life, but honouring him in another way.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Mice Guy TOP 100 REVIEWER on 15 May 2013
Format: Paperback
This volume reprints PunisherMax issues #17-22 from 2011. This series by Jason Aaron & Steve Dillon is set in an alternative universe to the regular Marvel one, as the Punisher gets his own private Ultimates-like universe, in order to tell the story of Wilson Fisk and his rise and fall as the Kingpin. In this final volume, the Punisher, having seen the rise of the Kingpin over the bodies of his Mafia bosses, seen off Bulseye, and escaped from prison, now has to face Electra before he can finally deal with Wilson Fisk. He begins with nothing, having to equip himself from the street criminals he works through building up his arsenal, while Vanessa Fiske and the Hand plot the downfall of her ex-husband. It all ends in tears.

Steve Dillon has mastered the dead eyes and cheerful grins of the criminals who inhabit the world of the Punisher, and he usually guarantees a blood-drenched five-star story of sadistic and casual killing, and this volume is no exception as he delivers his trademark epic slaughterhouse.
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As it says in the concluding note from the writer they were at pains to present the punisher as aging in real time in this book, confronting younger and more menacing, meaner bad guys with every villain they took down, this is brilliant and probably does address the thematic elephant in the room when it comes to the Punisher really well, ie his mission can not end/he has a death wish. However I did not like the way this translates into the art, overall its really good but switching between the gristled and aged present day Frank Castle and the youthful volunteer in Nam Frank I found an annoyance as a reader. Although there may be a certain respect in which I like the "Punisher as phantom menace", the shadow haunting criminals type of idea, like in Naked Kills.

One thing this volume has going for it, in a really big, big way, is that it does present the Punisher as every inch the damaged human being, that is human, all too human, in the way that Garth Ennis reinvented the character, mostly for the better, but unlike Ennis' more one dimensional psychopath Frank is portrayed as the soldier, family man etc. etc. I've always thought that it should be possible to do this without recinding his anti-hero rather than heroic status. I know that there has been some debate about what some of the flash backs to the life as a family man and subsequent death in the park sequences mean, ie that Frank may have unresolved guilt issues about not valuing all of the family equally or hoping some of them would survive while others died, I dont know and I dont think its that pivotal to the plot either.
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By Ivo Santos on 9 April 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the final chapter of Frank Castle life ( MAX Universe). This character is tragic and there is no other end to him than death. There is no happy endings.

Most of the action scenes were a bit cartoony for me this book could be much better if it had other artist than Dillon's. But it'sa good chapter either way.

This is recommended to all Punisher fans.
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