Pulse and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£13.11
  • RRP: £16.99
  • You Save: £3.88 (23%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Pulse has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Pulse Hardcover – 6 Jan 2011


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£13.11
£7.00 £0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Pulse + Levels of Life
Price For Both: £21.90

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Jonathan Cape; First Edition, First Impression edition (6 Jan 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224091085
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224091084
  • Product Dimensions: 14.7 x 2.5 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 291,832 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Julian Barnes is the author of ten novels, including Metroland, Flaubert's Parrot, A History of the World in 10½ Chapters and Arthur & George; two books of short stories, Cross Channel and The Lemon Table; and also three collections of journalism, Letters from London, Something to Declare, and The Pedant in the Kitchen.

His work has been translated into more than thirty languages. In France he is the only writer to have won both the Prix Médicis (for Flaubert's Parrot) and the Prix Femina (for Talking it Over). In 1993 he was awarded the Shakespeare Prize by the FVS Foundation of Hamburg. He lives in London.

Product Description

Review

"Pulse is Barnes’s 17th book and is a masterclass in the shorter form." (Elizabeth Day Observer)

Book Description

A brilliant, moving, poignant collection of stories, from the author of Cross Channel and The Lemon Table

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By James on 10 Oct 2011
Format: Paperback
Like most collections of short stories, the quality and interest of the individual stories varies. I found the final one - "Pulse", from which the volume gets its title - the most satisfying, if that is the right word for a story told by a man whose own marriage is disintegrating and whose elderly parents are facing serious health problems. In thirty pages Barnes creates a poignant picture of three people who are determinedly resilient in the face of life's problems. There are several further similarly sad stories, whilst others are lighter, for example the four separate "At Phil and Joanna's" stories which recount the dinner party conversations of a group of friends. I would like to think that these conversations are meant to be a caricature of the sorts of conversations that slightly smug middle class people might hold at dinner parties, since each participant seems to be trying to impress the others by how clever he/she is, and in the process they all come across as rather unlikeable. I quite enjoyed reading these stories once I had decided to view them as caricatures, but I can't help wondering whether this was really Barnes's intention. Perhaps he really does talk to his friends like this! As usual with Barnes's writing there is plenty of wit; I particularly enjoyed his observation on page 180 about a group of four noisily quarrelling people that "Mozart would have happily set this operatic quartet to music".

The short story format is a challenging one for a serious novelist, since it doesn't provide the opportunity for extended development of characters and themes. It is therefore difficult for even the very best writers to write anything memorable in this format. As an illustration, what are your ten favourite books?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 Mar 2012
Format: Paperback
"Moreover the Lord spoke to Moses, saying: 'Also take for yourself quality spices--five hundred shekels of liquid myrrh, half as much sweet-smelling cinnamon (two hundred and fifty shekels), two hundred and fifty shekels of sweet-smelling cane, five hundred shekels of cassia, according to the shekel of the sanctuary, and a hin of olive oil.'" -- Exodus 30:22-24 (NKJV)

At their best, Julian Barnes' stories in this collection are better than the best of his novels that I've read. His sense of irony can be devastating in the smaller confines of a short story. "East Wind" is such a story and powerfully opens the collection. "The Limner" is almost as good, but in a quite different way . . . emphasizing that the meek can get the upper hand.

"Pulse" was my least favorite story . . . but it's certainly well written.

I also wasn't thrilled by the four-part cocktail hour entitled "At Phil & Joanna's."

I strongly suspect that Julian Barnes could produce a much better volume of stories, but that would require choosing them for their quality . . . rather than for their fitting into a theme.

I would be glad to read another set, but I'd be tempted to check first to see which stories other people liked best and to just read those.

See what you think.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. A. Pearce on 7 Sep 2011
Format: Paperback
Short stories are the most under rated and technically difficult form of literature; so when someone gets it right it's all the more impressive. Barnes has nailed it! The style reminds me of John Cheever, and some of the stories are almost as good!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jimbo on 20 Jan 2012
Format: Paperback
This is the first collection of Julian Barnes' short stories that I have read, having previously enjoyed Arthur and George. This is an exceptionally enjoyable and diverse collection that frequently hits notes of beauty along the way.

Overall, these stories have a wide variety of starting points and settings, although there are recurring characters in the four "At Phil and Joanna" stories that are interleaved into the first half of the book. The "Phil and Joanna" stories follow the conversations of a group of friends attending dinner parties at a number of occasions. The speakers aren't identified, leaving the reader to work out whose voice is whose, and they have a realistic feel whilst also being very funny.

Whilst there humour to be found within the other stories, there is a sense of loneliness or loss running through a number of the stories. Whilst the story "Marriage Lines" focuses more explicitly on bereavement, it is often more subtly explored in the other stories. Barnes introduces us to a range of characters who have found themselves isolated either by through circumstances beyond them, or inadvertently of their own making. So, we are introduced to a pair of mid-list female novelists competing against each other but with no one to go home to in "Sleeping with John Updike"; we meet a rambler struggling to find a soul-mate in "Trespass"; "The Limner" is about a deaf portrait painter; and in "Harmony" features a pianist being treated for her loss of sight. My personal favourite was "Gardner's Questions", which focuses on a domestic tiff about what to do when a couple acquire a house with a garden for the first time. The characters are always well drawn, the narrators voice works well in each story and these are stories that are frequently moving.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback