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Pull Up Some Dust And Sit Down

4.1 out of 5 stars 54 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (5 Sept. 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Nonesuch/Perro Verde
  • ASIN: B005BY8MSM
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 49,968 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. No Banker Left Behind
  2. El Corrido de Jesse James
  3. Quick Sand
  4. Dirty Chateau
  5. Humpty Dumpty World
  6. Christmas Time This Year
  7. Baby Joined the Army
  8. Lord Tell Me Why
  9. I Want My Crown
  10. John Lee Hooker for President
  11. Dreamer
  12. Simple Tools
  13. If There's a God

Product Description

Product Description

titolo-pull up some dust and sit downartista-ry cooder etichetta-nonesuch-n. dischi1data-30 agosto 2011supporto-cd audiogenere-folk e country----brani1.no banker left behind 2.el corrido de jesse james 3.quick sand 4.dirty chateau 5.humpty dumpty world 6.christmas time this year 7.baby joined the army 8.lord tell me why 9.i want my crown 10.john lee hooker for president 11.dreamer 12.tools simple 13.if there's a god 14.no hard feelings

BBC Review

When Ry Cooder recorded his first two albums, collections of songs by the likes of Lead Belly and Woody Guthrie that evoked the desperate times of the Great Depression, he could scarcely have imagined that 40 years later he'd be singing of the same old problems, but relating them to modern times.

In the intervening years since that eponymous 1970 debut and the following year's Into the Purple Valley, Cooder has learned to trust his own songwriting rather than relying on his encyclopaedic folk and blues knowledge, and few of his nearly 30 albums and soundtracks have been as strong as this.

His last album, I, Flathead in 2008, told the story of beatnik salt flats racer Kash Buk, and although one theme similarly emerges from Pull Up Some Dust�, here Cooder delivers numerous desperate, broken, bloodied and disenfranchised folk left to rot by those who put greed before humanity. Individually they are studies in blues, country, dustbowl folk and boogie, but collectively they add up to a powerful state of the nation address.

Bleak humour streaks most of Pull Up Some Dust�, whether it's the hard-done-by financiers dragging up the ladders on No Banker Left Behind, maimed soldiers returning home in the anti-war polka Christmas Time This Year, or his hilarious impersonation on John Lee Hooker for President, which imagines The Hook's manifesto for the White House ("Everyone gets one bourbon, one scotch, one beer / Three times a day if they stay cool / And little chill'uns get milk, cream and alcohol / Two times a day if they stay involved in school").

Elsewhere, Jesse James contemplates returning from Heaven to visit some Old West justice on Wall Street in the Tennessee waltzing El Corrido de Jesse James, the pleasures of an uncomplicated life are extolled in Tex-Mex ballad Simple Tools and The Almighty is lambasted for His negligence in If There's a God. In the end, however, on parting shot No Hard Feelings Cooder dismisses the rich and powerful as ripples in history welcome to go their way if they let him travel his own path.

Good luck with that, Ry, but this is about as good and sustained a riposte to the grubby, grabbing times we live in as any artist has mustered, which makes it essential listening.

--Andy Fyfe

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
In the same way that Neil Young gave a vitriolic state of the nation report to America with 2006's "Living with war" we now have another veteran guitarist and giant of real music making a similar declaration. Like Young, the Californian master musician Ry Cooder doesn't like very much of what he sees at the present time whether it be greedy bankers, embezzling landlords, lamentable television, rabble rousing politicians and the prospect of young men being sent into early graves. The great news is that he wraps up all this social comment in "Pull up some dust and sit down" in some of the finest songs he has recorded in years. This album sees a return to the funky preoccupations of "Bop til you drop" with an excellent gospel base, a nice Mexican tinge and a reverential nod to the folk protest of Woody Guthrie. Throughout the musicianship is so good its almost criminal and its worth stressing that as a protest album Cooder's latest is jam packed with sly humour and repeated listens will leave you with a very broad grin.

The whole album sets out its stall with "No Banker left behind" inspired by a Robert Scheer column in the Huffington Post where Cooder arraigns these vile creatures and comments "Well the bankers called a meetin', to the Whitehouse they went one day/They was going to call on the president, in a quiet and a sociable way/The afternoon was sunny and the weather it was fine/They counted all our money and no banker was left behind". It is very funny but also very cutting, a national anthem for a new depression which could be adopted by the US and a dozen other countries, Next is the excellent Mexican flavoured "El Corrida de Jesse James" which is followed by two of the albums massive highlights.
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Format: Audio CD
After completing his epic California Trilogy, with its stories of life in his home state in the 40s and 50s, Ry Cooder returns with a solo project that is as refreshing, brave and original as his early recordings in the 70s.
This time round there are no elaborate narratives, but there is a common theme: these are songs of a broken, divided society and the gap between rich and poor, but with the anger matched against humour. He's a master at setting bleak or thoughtful lyrics against jaunty melodies.
"No Banker Left Behind" is the story of bankers on a spree after they "robbed the nation blind", set to a romping, country-edged tune, while "Christmas Time This Year" places a horrific story of war casualties against a cheerful Mexican dance melody, with accordion from Flaco Jiménez.
Ry Cooder plays guitar, mandola, banjo, bass and keyboards, and constantly changes direction from the evocative portrait of a rich man and his maid in "Dirty Chateau" to the gospel-edged stomp of "Lord Tell Me Why ("a white man ain't worth nothing in this land no more"), which is quickly followed by the witty blues of "John Lee Hooker for President".
He ends with "No Hard Feelings", a finely sung ballad that first rewrites Woody Guthrie ("this land should have been our land") and ends in despair and resignation.
Magnificent. R. Denselow
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Format: Audio CD
I've listened to Cooder for thirty years and to my ears he's had some driftings and dead ends with some of the albums along the way - this isn't one of them. He's right where he needs to be with the lyrics and his playing is so restrained, well-judged and sweet I can't imagine anyone doing it better. Music that speaks straight to your heart.
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Format: Audio CD
His California Trilogy behind him, Ry Cooder now turns his attention to the state of the nation. No spoiler alert needed, but it isn't exactly a favourable report on the Land of the Free.

Starting with 2005's `Chavez Ravine', Cooder's music has become increasingly politicised and there are few holds barred here, with the banking crisis, the war in Iraq, immigration and the environment just a few of his targets.

All Cooder's traditional musical styles are amply represented here, from dustbowl-style acoustic blues through Tex-Mex, rock `n' roll, gospel, doo-wop, old-time crooners and then some.

There are welcome cameos from a number of familiar Cooder stalwarts: Jim Keltner, Flaco Jimenez, Terry Evans, Arnold McCuller and Willie Green all make appearances, alongside son Joachim Cooder and vocalist Juliette Commagere, an ever-present since `Chavez Ravine'.

"Baby Joined The Army" is a long, bleak, raw, stripped down and primal blues, in which the protagonist chillingly and tellingly observes "They told me if I get killed in battle, I still get paid". Bet that was a winning line down at the recruitment stations.

"Humpty Dumpty World" and "Lord Tell Me Why" are musical throwbacks to such albums as "Bop Till You Drop" and "Borderline", the latter interesting for its paradoxical use of a blatantly Afro-American vocal arrangement to bemoan the fact that "A white man ain't worth nothing in this world no more". Along with the rocking "I Want My Crown" it's arguably the best thing on the album.

Despite the pervading seriousness, there's still much fun to be had.
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