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Public Image
 
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Public Image

3 Mar 2003 | Format: MP3

7.92 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
9:10
30
2
1:25
30
3
5:53
30
4
6:05
30
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3:01
30
6
3:38
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7
2:55
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8
7:46


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Mar 2003
  • Release Date: 1 Mar 2003
  • Label: Virgin Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1978 Virgin Records LtdThis label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved.(C) 1978 Virgin Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 39:53
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001J8O2YC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 44,037 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Sep 2002
Format: Audio CD
Early PiL is, without a doubt, immensely greater than the mess that became the band in the late 80's, early 90's. Jah Wobble, Keith Levene, Jim Walker and John Lydon never got on splendidly, but they could really put an album together well, and formed the best PiL line-up that there ever would be. Album opener "Theme" is an 8-minute epic that few people have ever heard......you will either lose yourself in the solid wall of hypnotic noise, or very quickly press the skip button. The two Religion songs are interesting, the first seeing Lydon reciting a powerful and cynical prayer, before backing it up solidly with the second song featuring a gritty, bone shaking guitar riff. The bouncy "Annalisa" keeps things moving well, and the tragic "Low Life" (based on the now dead Sid Vicious) adds a more personal side to this album. The roaring classic "Public Image" is a perfect, exciting song that hits home immediately and makes you love it, on-pain-of-death. And finally the grating "Attack" and the pointless "Fodderstompf", which has some nice banter but will not be listened to more than once, the two songs that keep this album from 5/5 status. Altogether though, a thrilling, underated album.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Aug 2004
Format: Audio CD
after the sex pistols fragmented, johnny rotten reverted back to his real name (lydon) and set about carving a pistols-free and lot more experimental musical path. so, along with old pals jah wobble and keith levene, plus newly recruited drummer martin atkins, lydon formed public image ltd, or 'pil' for short.
released in 1978, 'first issue' (or 'public image', i don't know) is part one in the trilogy of pil's best albums (which, coincidentally, are their first three albums).
musically, there are some ties with the past, especially on the bouncier numbers, such as the single 'public image'. but for the most part, the newly-made pil trademarks are already there: lydon's sneering has been replaced by agonizing shrieks and howls and the drums sound like machine gun shots. keith levene's guitar work is all scratches and slashes, razor-sharp riffs. but the true star here (yeah, take a step back, john) is bassist jah wobble. there's a famous quote of his: "nobody listened to the bass in rock music before pil." gone are the times when the bass was just some quiet boom in the background. as soon as you hit play, wobble's signature low-end dub rumble comes at you from all sides, the grooves rattling the walls and shaking your senses.
'first issue' is basically an album of bleak, claustrophobic noise rock, with subtle inflections of dub and even disco (that would become even more obvious on the next album). the journey begins with the nine-minute dirge that is 'theme'- "I WISH I COULD DIIEEEEE!" screams lydon. you'll either become entranced or get bored swiftly. 'religion I & II' is lydon's voice chanting out the evils of religion, first completely solo, then reprised with instrumental backing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By TS Samuel on 9 Jan 2008
Format: Audio CD
John Lydon was 22 years old and almost certainly reeling from the media traumas inflicted upon him following the aftermath of the Sex Pistols when he recorded this blistering effort under the moniker of his new band, Pil.

Harrowing and hilarious in turns,from the euphoric trashing of the past in 'Public Image' to the hysterical dub-psychosis of 'Fodderstompf',Pil's first album is often a suffocating and discordant pleasure best sampled with the headphones on or blasting out in the small hours with the neighbour thumping on the ceiling below..Keith Levenes gyroscopic, shrill guitar lines blurred with Jah Wobble's doom laden bass with Lydon's mocking, detatched vocals cutting through the middle make this an unforgettable experience.

Critics claim second effort 'Metal Box' is the superior effort , but Pil's first release acts as a startling statement of intent that resonates today..never mind the bollocks, heres Pil..
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. L. Wilkinson on 2 Sep 2009
Format: Audio CD
In 1979 the Sex Pistols still had singles released on the back of the rock n roll swindle film.I liked them as an impressionable 13 yr old as a kind of cartoon band.
They made their mark earlier and had such a massive impact,but now it seems like ancient history.
PIL however I immediately liked just for the music,and still do today.They sounded different to all the punk bands.
Looking back on that period,I find the most interesting of the late 70's crop of bands were the ones doing their own thing,be it PIL,Tubeway Army,Cabaret Voltaire,Suicide,Siouxsie,Throbbing Gristle or even old dogs like sparks.The numerous 'punk' bands often sounded like pastiches of pistols or even just pop music with the volume turned up and an aporoximation of a snarl.
Punk became like my generation's 60's,a golden age where everything was good and to be a poseur (i.e not sounding like a zerox of buzzcocks) was a crime on a par with the moors murders.PIL helped blow that narrow minded way of thinking out of the water and still sound remarkable today.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 Mar 2010
Format: Audio CD
Blasting out an accapella impromptu version of Religion to an assembled mass of born again in 79 Chelmsford. Unfortunately with their kind hearts, I had chosen the wrong throng, they were Quakers. They smiled and clapped, something of a surreal moment. Although unfortunately marred by a local wanting to take venegance. People did not need any excuse in the 70's for violence. A quick mexican stand off, eyes a twitching ensued, before the tension disipated but was never forgotten. The point of this recollection?

The lyrics resonated because the 70's were still in the twitches of a religious era, albeit at the end. Sunday School, hymn singing and scripture reading were all staple indoctrination of young people in the 60's and 70's. Even now 40 agnostic years later I can still remember all the hymns and carols inculcated at Primary School and Sunday School.

Rotten became Lydon in the brief walk of fame from the bad boy band Pistols to the adult experimental sounds of Pil, a walk consumed with trauma.

The weight on the shoulders was heavy. Those caught in the media glare were given full demonic exposure. Emerging from adolescence, to find your image plasted over newspapers, billboards, record covers and TV, haunting the imagination of pubescent brains needs some form of adjustment. It leads to narcissus forever gazing into his own reflection finding it airbrushed into perfection.

The Pistols were vilified by the adult world, they alienated one source of potential support, the 68 generation by proclaiming their redundancy. The Spitfire pilots, the Airey Neave generation were unutterably appauled. The war had been fought and won, for council estate people to mock the establishment.
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