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Psychology Of Everyday Things Hardcover – 13 Jun 1988


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Frequently Bought Together

Psychology Of Everyday Things + Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things + Universal Principles of Design, Revised and Updated: 115 Ways to Enhance Usability, Influence Perception, Increase Appeal, Make Better Design Decisions and Teach Through Design
Price For All Three: £42.73

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books (13 Jun 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465067093
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465067091
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 1.6 x 23.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 280,506 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

About the Author

Donald A. Norman is Professor of Computer Science at Northwestern University, a former "Apple Fellow," and a partner in the Nielsen Norman Group Consulting Firm, which consults with corporations on design. He is the author of a number of books on design, including Emotional Design and the best-selling The Design of Everyday Things. He lives in Northbrook, Illinois and Palo Alto, California.

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First Sentence
"You would need an engineering degree from MIT to work this," someone once told me, shaking his head in puzzlement over his brand new digital watch. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Jun 1999
Format: Hardcover
Same book as the paperback "The Design of Everyday Things". Just as good a book under either title. (You'll find more reviews of it under the other title.)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Jun 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book should be a pre-requisite for all entering students in industrial design or at least a textbook for a class in human factors/ergonomics. That it is so enjoyable to read for non-designers is a plus.
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By Rolf Dobelli TOP 500 REVIEWER on 11 Jan 2008
Format: Hardcover
Dome-headed engineering professors call it "human factors engineering," "interaction design" or "usability engineering," but the purpose of this strangely-named discipline is far simpler than these appellations suggest: to make everyday items do what users expect them to do. Donald Norman has been thinking about usability issues longer than almost anyone and has insights commensurate with his experience. Norman knows how both people and machines work (he has degrees in psychology and engineering). More importantly, he knows how to bridge the gulf between the human mind and the devices the mind wants to use, from toasters to telephones to teapots. In this classic, he provides a few simple precepts and many wonderful examples showing how to design the most important component of any technology - the user's experience. While some of Norman's examples are a little long in the tooth (he discusses VCRs, not DVDs), we find that the principles he describes in this friendly book are still sprightly almost 20 years after their initial publication.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Mar 1998
Format: Hardcover
This book breaks through the ergonomics enlightment barrier. There is now NO excuse for overtly anti-user design. Except that the ideas appear so obvious after reading that cynics will continue to trivialise usability as cosmetic. Essential reading for Designers, Programmers, Engineers, Architects and a lot more besides.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tom du Pré on 11 April 2002
Format: Hardcover
...This book has very little if anything to do with software design, or even door handle to tap design. These examples are given purely to demonstrate what the book is really about, which the Design of the human brain. Although he talks a lot about the physical objects around us, he continually refers back to why the objects are the way they are and how the human brain makes decisions about how it will interact will them. He is trying to explain that the design of objects does not exist in isolation. An object is not in itself functional. It becomes functional when it begins to interact with its surroundings, and that interaction is frequently with humans. As well as interacting physically with objects, human must interact psychologically with them, although this psychological is frequently (and often should be) sub conscious. Understanding the nature of these subconscious psychological interaction with our surrounding's is what this book is about, and it's very interesting, often amusing, and despite the dodgy 1970's photos, it will be timeless.
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