Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Psalms: 1-72 (Tyndale Old Testament Commentary Series) Paperback – 17 Sep 1973


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 17 Sep 1973
"Please retry"
£0.01
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.



Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Inter-Varsity Press (17 Sep 1973)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0851118283
  • ISBN-13: 978-0851118284
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 12.4 x 2.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 510,048 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Derek Kidner was formerly Warden of Tyndale House, Cambridge. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1. Hebrew poetry (extract)

The Old Testament repeatedly breaks out into poetry. Even its narratives are graced here and there with a couplet or a longer sequence of verse to make some memorable point (cf. e.g. Gen. 2 - 4 in any modern version), and its prophecies predominantly take this form. While the Psalms are the main body of poems in Scripture, and were given (with Job and Proverbs) a distinctive system of accents by the Massoretes to mark the fact, they are themselves surrounded by poetry and rooted in a long and popular poetic tradition.

By its suppleness of form, Hebrew poetry lent itself well to this widespread use. A proverbial saying, a riddle, an orator's appeal, a prayer, a thanksgiving, to mention only a few varieties of speech, could all slip into its rhythms almost effortlessly, for its metre was not parcelled out in `feet' or in a prescribed arrangement of strong and weak syllables, but heard in the sound of, say, three or four stresses in a short sentence or phrase, matched by an answering line of about the same length. The lighter syllables interspersed with the stronger were of no fixed number, and the tally of strong beats in a line could itself be varied with some freedom within a single poem. There was room and to spare for spontaneity.

A hint of these rhythms can be felt at times even in translation, when our words happen to correspond roughly with the Hebrew. In the latter, while there are sometimes lines of two stresses, or of four or even more, the commonest rhythm is 3:3, which comes through in, e.g., the RSV of Psalm 26:2,

Próve me, O Lórd, and trý me;

tést my héart and my mínd.

... But the fundamental characteristic of this poetry was not its external forms or rhythms, but its way of matching or echoing one thought with another. This has been described as thought rhyme, but more often as `parallelism', a term introduced by Bishop Robert Lowth in the eighteenth century. It is recognizable at once in such a couplet as Psalm 103:10, where the two lines are synonymous:

He does not deal with us according to our sins,

nor requite us according to our iniquities.

In this form of parallelism the second line (or sometimes a second verse) simply reinforces the first, so that its content is enriched and the total effect becomes spacious and impressive. The nuances of difference between the synonyms should not be over-pressed; they are in double harness rather than in competition. So, e.g., `man' and `the son of man' in Psalm 8:4, or `my soul' and `my flesh' in 63:1 are paired rather than contrasted. ... --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Steven M Wallis on 5 July 2014
Verified Purchase
As described - quick delivery
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Verified Purchase
As with the second of these two commentaries on the Psalms, my only regret is that I didn't buy it years ago; for Psalm after Psalm, it clearly summarises conclusions it has taken me hours of research to arrive at . It provides an accessible and concise yet thorough overview of each psalm, convincingly addressing speculative criticisms, clarifying the meaning of the Hebrew text, highlighting how it relates to other Old and New Testament Scriptures, and inspiring contemporary application. These two commentaries are ideal for those who want to understand and apply the Psalms; even those conducting academic research will find them to be a helpful introduction and overview. This first one also includes a helpful introduction to key matters such as understanding Hebrew poetry, the titles of the Psalms, and the interpretation of the psalmists' cries for vengeance.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By AFI on 8 July 2010
This commentary does the job but it is a little dated. Given the price for a used copy it represents good value for money.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Hugh Mann on 12 April 2010
Verified Purchase
Engaging read. Thought it might get a bit technical but am glad it's not too theologically written.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback