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Protectors: Stories to Benefit PROTECT
 
 

Protectors: Stories to Benefit PROTECT [Kindle Edition]

Andrew Vachss , Joe R. Lansdale , George Pelecanos , Ken Bruen , Charles de Lint , James Reasoner , Chet Williamson , Wayne D. Dundee , Charlie Stella , Thomas Pluck
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Print List Price: 10.08
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Product Description

Product Description

41 Authors. 41 Stories. One Cause.

We've rallied a platoon of crime, western, thriller, fantasy, noir, horror and transgressive authors to support PROTECT's important work: lobbying for legislation that protects children from physical, sexual, and emotional abuse.

Protectors includes the exclusive three opening chapters to Ken Bruen's upcoming novel Spectre in the Galway Wind, plus powerful stories from George Pelecanos, Andrew Vachss, Joe R. Lansdale, Charles de Lint, Chet Williamson, James Reasoner, Charlie Stella, Michael A. Black, Wayne Dundee, Roxane Gay, Ray Banks, Tony Black, Les Edgerton and 27 more, and 100% of the proceeds go to PROTECT.

Among PROTECT's victories are the Protect Our Children Act of 2008, which mandated that the Justice Department change course and design a new national nerve center for law enforcement to wage a war on child exploitation, the Hero to Hero program, which employs disabled veterans in the battle against child abuse, and Alicia's Law.

PROTECTORS includes a foreword by rock critic Dave Marsh, and fiction by Patti Abbott, Ian Ayris, Ray Banks, Nigel Bird, Michael A. Black, Tony Black, R. Thomas Brown, Ken Bruen, Bill Cameron, Jen Conley, Charles de Lint, Wayne D. Dundee, Chad Eagleton, Les Edgerton, Andrew Fader, Matthew C. Funk, Roxane Gay, Edward A. Grainger, Glenn G. Gray, Jane Hammons, Amber Keller, Joe R. Lansdale, Frank Larnerd, Gary Lovisi, Mike Miner, Zak Mucha, Dan O'Shea, George Pelecanos, Thomas Pluck, Richard Prosch, Keith Rawson, James Reasoner, Todd Robinson, Johnny Shaw, Gerald So, Josh Stallings, Charlie Stella, Andrew Vachss, Steve Weddle, Dave White, and Chet Williamson.

Join the fight, with 41 stories by top writers. Be a Protector!

About the Author

Thomas Pluck writes unflinching fiction with heart. His stories have appeared in Shotgun Honey, PANK magazine, Crime Factory, Spinetingler, Plots with Guns, Beat to a Pulp, McSweeney's, The Utne Reader and elsewhere. He edits the Lost Children charity anthologies to benefit PROTECT: The National Association to Protect Children. He is working on his first novel. He lives in New Jersey with his wife Sarah. You can find him as @tommysalami on Twitter, and on the web at www.thomaspluck.com

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1394 KB
  • Print Length: 376 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1479236470
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Goombah Gumbo Press (30 Aug 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S. r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0094KRGOK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #305,357 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This anthology exists to raise awareness and funds for PROTECT. What is PROTECT? PROTECT and the National Association to Protect Children are there to help stop and prevent child abuse in. It is a worthy cause and if like me you happen to live in another country this book will make you consider issues you'd rather see as headlines. The next time you are considering charitable donations think of the children.

I nearly didn't bother writing this review as the forward in it says everything I want to say a lot better than I could. There is one line in the forward that I'll paraphrase for you. It sums up everything that is important when considering child abuse. There are two numbers that are important when considering child abuse. One is too many abuse victims and zero is the only acceptable number of abused children (it really is put better in the book so go check it out).

The first couple of stories are classic examples of what most of us would consider the normal (there is nothing normal about abuse so please excuse my flippant choice of words) view of child abuse and all the disturbing details that entails. I found these first few stories really difficult to read. They certainly are not for the faint-hearted. Keep reading though as the tone changes. Every story involves a child being in jeopardy but not always in a way I would have considered before. Some of the stories are very subtle and make you consider your own upbringing. There was one story in particular that involved bleach and a baby. I couldn't believe anybody could be that evil in real life. The very next day there was a story about a woman giving a bottle of bleach to a random small child in a fast-food restaurant.
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Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
No comment. Why do I need to fill this out when I have already rated the goods above? The rating should speak for itself. Would I buy some more? Yes. There, that should fill up the space.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  12 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 great authors, 41 great stories, 1 low price 9 Oct 2012
By leknifrag - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I bought this book because I believe in Protect.org's mission to be a voice for the children. I thought I would get some neat stories written by some good authors so I would be donating to a worthy cause and get a little reward for my good work. What I got instead was a series of edge-of-seat stories that kept my attention. I also discovered some new writers.
I won't go into all the great short stories here but I will say that i was very impressed with the new writers I found. I encourage anyone to buy this as a gift or a donation to a local library, as well. Money well spent!
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy this dang book!!! 1 Sep 2012
By J Larkin Stallings - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Even if you're a heartless sob and you don't give a wit about protecting at risk kids, buy this book. You are going to have to look far and wide to find better collection of crime writers (not just saying this just cuz one of the writers has my last name.... he does and I've read every word he's written...always time well spent)
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Stories. Good Cause. Go get it. 19 Oct 2012
By ND - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Forty-one pieces of writing from 41 writers of crime, noir, horror, fantasy, western, and other pulpy goodness. It's a helluva bargain and the proceeds to go toward lobbying the protection of children from abuse. That last bit is reason enough to plunk down your dollars, but that doesn't mean you walk away empty-handed. These aren't just fluffy pieces, churned out in a fit of charity. Some are hard to read, but it's because they're haunting, not for lack of grammar and spelling. I mean, you have people like Patricia Abbot and Ken Bruen involved.

As with any story collection, some are better than others. But, like anything, "better" is a subjective term so your opinion and mine may differ. That said, I'll tell you about a few of my favorites and if you want to tell me about yours, the comments are open.

"Black Shuck" is one of the longer, if not the longest, of the stories and that gives it space to spread out, not in a blobbish way, but in a layered, atmospheric, moody sort of way that drags you deep into the holler and makes you wonder how you or anyone else will ever get out.

"Adeline" left me with all manner of whatifs, both historically and within the story, the even-if-the-plan-worked-was-it-enough sort. "Done for the Day" is about fourteen kinds of sad and desperate. I found it had almost draped over me the day I read it during lunch and had to shake it off vigorously. "Take it Like a Man" serves as a glimmer of hope in the shape of what, for a while, seems like an all-too-familiar tragedy.

"Planning for the Future" might be easier to accept as a story if I hadn't met girls like that at work. And "A Blind Eye" is about what can happen when ignorance and meanness are met with an overtaxed system. It's easy for people outside such systems to wonder why no one would catch the first or report the second, but people inside know how hard it is to spot the girl in Funk's story and how easy it is to mistake something innocent for something malicious (and vice versa), such as in Gray's tale.

To summarize or give away anything feels unfair. These stories are so compact that it feels like an injustice to let anything out of the bag. Plus, I prefer wandering blindly into short stories. If you're not that kind of person, editor Pluck has been giving you a taste of one per day over on his Facebook page.

Pros: Most of the stories are very strong and some are by well-known names. Your favorites and mine may differ, but it's a solid collection and it benefits and good cause.

Cons: Because of the theme, some of the stories can be a trigger for people who have suffered abuse or may be unpleasant for people who dislike reading about abuse. There's a lot of protection and vengeance in these tales, but just the same... If, however, you feel strongly about the cause, consider giving a copy as a gift or donating to PROTECT directly.

Bottom Line: 39 stories and 2 poems for $4.99 (digital) or $15.95 (paperback) is a good deal. The fact that it goes to help a good cause? Gravy or whipped cream or bourbon -- you know, whichever.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crime noir authors write stonkingly good abuse stories 18 Sep 2012
By IuchiAtesoro - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This anthology exists to raise awareness and funds for PROTECT. What is PROTECT? PROTECT and the National Association to Protect Children are there to help stop and prevent child abuse in. It is a worthy cause and if like me you happen to live in another country this book will make you consider issues you'd rather see as headlines. The next time you are considering charitable donations think of the children.

I nearly didn't bother writing this review as the forward in it says everything I want to say a lot better than I could. There is one line in the forward that I'll paraphrase for you. It sums up everything that is important when considering child abuse. There are two numbers that are important when considering child abuse. One is too many abuse victims and zero is the only acceptable number of abused children (it really is put better in the book so go check it out).

The first couple of stories are classic examples of what most of us would consider the normal (there is nothing normal about abuse so please excuse my flippant choice of words) view of child abuse and all the disturbing details that entails. I found these first few stories really difficult to read. They certainly are not for the faint-hearted. Keep reading though as the tone changes. Every story involves a child being in jeopardy but not always in a way I would have considered before. Some of the stories are very subtle and make you consider your own upbringing. There was one story in particular that involved bleach and a baby. I couldn't believe anybody could be that evil in real life. The very next day there was a story about a woman giving a bottle of bleach to a random small child in a fast-food restaurant. There really are some nasty people out there, but more importantly there are children who need the help and support of every single one of us.

I'm not going to talk about the individual stories as there are over thirty of them. I will however mention the one that had the most resonance with my own upbringing. Black Shuck by Thomas Pluck. I've read a few stories by Mr Pluck and have really enjoyed all of them. When I was a kid over here in England we had stories of The Black Dog. Anybody who saw the dog will die. It was a tale all of my friends growing up heard round the fire or at a sleep-over. I only knew two people that claimed to have see the dog and both of them died within six months. They were both heading to the gutter at terminal velocity through severe drug issues but the story is still there in the back of my mind. It seems I am not the only one. This story like a lot of the others is one not to miss.

One of the things I like about this anthology is that the transition between stories is not too harsh. It flows like an old rock album. It starts out hard and grabs you by the collar before chilling out a little and finding a groove. Then the second half gradually increases in intensity until the conclusion. It is a well written and put together collection of fictional stories, BUT the jeopardy is real. There are children out there that need us. If you do nothing else for them buy this book. Even that could help save a child.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Reads 7 Nov 2012
By Stephanie B - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Great benefit..Protect.org...and great writing....I felt the authors captured exactly why we fight against predators. It is refreshing and also sad that the authors who lent their words to capture the hell and humanity that goes with child abuse. They did more then just scratch the surface...they put a huge crater in making a voice of why predators cannot get sweetheart deals anymore..and why kids need to become first in our eyes.
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