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Protection

28 Aug 2006 | Format: MP3

5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 6.90 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
1
7:51
2
5:16
3
3:49
4
5:00
5
5:21
6
4:13
7
5:11
8
5:24
9
3:39
10
3:15

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 24 Jan 1995
  • Release Date: 24 Jan 1995
  • Label: Virgin UK
  • Copyright: (C) 1994 Virgin Records LtdThis label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved.(C) 1994 Virgin Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:59
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001HY7C6S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 15,182 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
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3
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4
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By micheo@globalnet.co.uk on 20 April 2001
Format: Audio CD
If I had this album on vinal rather than CD, the needle would have cut a groove so deep it would come through to the other side. I have played this album over and over and I have never tired of it. Simply put, it is a masterpiece. This album was one of the few I have listened to on the listening post at HMV before I bought it (I had only heard the one song, 'Unfinished Sympathy', prior to this album. Immediatelty I was transfixed by the enourmous bass lines of 'better things' and the angelic vocals of protection. 3 singers each with 2 songs apiece, and two instrumentals make this a varied, but coherent colaboration.
If I was to make one critisism, it is the dreadful cover of light my fire on the final track. What were they thinking of? I never let my CD play this song before I take it off.
This album has remained my favorite album of the 90's.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Carey Marks on 23 Dec 2006
Format: Audio CD
I remember well the period of the early nineties - and the sounds that were in my life then. Much of my leisure time was spent clubbing: fast-paced, loud, excitable and generally full-on. It was a good time and the music I heard when I was out was fantastic. But I often felt some "humanity" was missing. During those 'down times' I'd drop Protection onto my record player and slide back into a feeling of warmth, honesty and embracing lyrics. "Lyrics!" I thought, that's what's was missing! What was the point otherwise? It was simply music only of the 'thrill factor'. Of course I listened to other classics that my collection contained, but this was the sound at the time. And Massive Attack had seemed to tap into the zeitgeist.

There was a brooding sense of darkness in these sounds, an almost brutal honestly that sometimes alluded to some parts of life not being particularly beautiful, but they were still parts of our lives nonetheless. And the honest narrative only helped to fortify this truth.

Using an original approach to sampling whereby the samples actually meant something: ie: they had a reference point, the sound is cut-up, urban and powerful, and certainly not "dance music" as some have mistakenly presumed. But it's the vocals of Nicolette, the lovely Tracy Thorn and the unique Horace Andy that provide the backdrop to the unmatchable Massive sound. When these two are mixed there is an infectious draw that certainly resonates for me. But maybe that's because the music means something to me?

But the point is, it turned out that this music meant something to most people then. And that time has passed.

Thankfully we're entering another period whereby the music is beginning the mean something. If it has stayed like it was before for any longer I would have gone mad.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Rock 'N' Roll fan on 17 Sep 2011
Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
The reason I'm only giving this album two stars is because it is a review of the sound quality of the vinyl edition of the album, the music itself is worth four stars in my opinion. The first thing I noticed when I played this record was that it was very quiet but luckily my amplifier is powerful enough to be cranked up sufficiently. However, there was a serious lack of bass on the first two tracks. This is because side 1 is over 27 minutes long. The maximum length a side of vinyl should be is around 24 minutes long, and less for a bass intensive album such as this. The overall album length is about 48 minutes, so it should of been pressed onto two records. The song protection sounds considerably inferior without that deep bass sound.

However, for some reason Three and Weather Storm sound better than the CD version. Nicolette's voice on Three sounds more sensual and has more presence than on the CD version. Craig Armstrong's piano playing on Weather Storm also sounds more intricate. Whether these differences are caused by a different mix, the equipment I'm using or the inherent difference between CD and Vinyl I am not 100% sure.

When I turned the record over the first thing I noticed was that Better Things was a lot louder and had 10 times more bass than anything on side 1. This is because side 2 is around 21 minutes long.
However at the end of this track there was severe vocal sibilance. This continues throughout Eurochild and Sly but is absent on Light My Fire. I tried turning my amplifier right down but the sibilance was still there on these tracks. This somewhat ruins the magic of Nicolette's jazzy vocals on Sly. Since I can only think of one record that I own where the sibilance is this bad I can only assume it is the fault of the mastering.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Zebulebu on 17 Sep 2003
Format: Audio CD
The poppiest of the Massive Attack albums suffers none for its apparent desire to showcase the group's murky, dark sound to a wider audience. On this album, the three 'true' members of the group bring in a number of guest stars including long-time companion Tricky, Horace Andy, Tracy Thorn and Nicolette. This tactic paid dividened with debut album 'Blue Lines' - Shara Nelson's beautiful voice made 'Unfinished Sympathy' into a massive hit - and it paid off again in spades with this classic.
From the opening, quite beautiful title track to the last cut (a live, mega-dubby version of the Doors classic 'Light My Fire') this album is breathtaking in its impact. You'll find yourself listening to the whole album right through on more than one occasion and wondering where the hell the time went.
Perfect for relaxing to, going to sleep to or travelling to work, this album is, as stated earlier, much more commercial than the group's other work. But make no mistake, the dark undercurrent is still there. Witness the slithering bass of 'Karmacoma' - with Tricky's harsh, breathed vocals over the top. Or the dark majesty of 'Spying Glass' - guest vocals from reggae legend Horace Andy. Both are classic cuts.
But the true heights of the album are the two numbers with Nicolette providing vocals, namely 'Three' and 'Sly'. This woman has the most incredible voice - you just have to hear it to believe it. Reminiscent of a cross between Eartha Kitt, Shirley Bassey and Nina Simone, yet managing to sound completely original, her vocals are just breathtaking. Unfortunately, her solo album 'No Government' is a hit and miss affair, largely a mess of drum and bass with a smattering of good tracks. Still, the two tracks on here more than make up for the disappointment of that album.
One of those albums that should be in EVERY music fan's collection
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