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Prokofiev - Alexander Nevsky; Scythian Suite

Gergiev Audio CD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £14.99
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V A L E R Y G E R G I E V

Valery Gergiev is internationally recognized as one of the most outstanding musical figures of his generation. His inspired leadership as Artistic and General Director of the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, Russia, where he oversees the Kirov Orchestra, Ballet and Opera, has brought universal acclaim to this legendary institution. Together with the ... Read more in Amazon's Gergiev Store

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Product details

  • Orchestra: Kirov Orchestra
  • Conductor: Valery Gergiev
  • Composer: Sergey Prokofiev
  • Audio CD (7 April 2003)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Philips
  • ASIN: B000089CDY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 188,490 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Prokofiev: Scythian Suite, Op.20 - "Ala and Lolly" - 1. Invocation to Veles and AlaValery Gergiev 7:37£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Prokofiev: Scythian Suite, Op.20 - "Ala and Lolly" - 2. The Evil God and Dance of the Pagan MonstersValery Gergiev 3:30£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Prokofiev: Scythian Suite, Op.20 - "Ala and Lolly" - 3. NightValery Gergiev 6:19£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Prokofiev: Scythian Suite, Op.20 - "Ala and Lolly" - 4. Lolly's Pursuit of the Evil God, and SunriseValery Gergiev 5:58£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Prokofiev: Alexander Nevsky, Op.78 - 1. Russia under the Mongolian YokeValery Gergiev 2:43£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Prokofiev: Alexander Nevsky, Op.78 - 2. Song about Alexander NevskyValery Gergiev 2:37£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Prokofiev: Alexander Nevsky, Op.78 - 3. The Crusaders in PskovValery Gergiev 5:42£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Prokofiev: Alexander Nevsky, Op.78 - 4. Arise, Ye Russian PeopleValery Gergiev 2:13£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Prokofiev: Alexander Nevsky, Op.78 - 5. The Battle on IceValery Gergiev13:03£1.89  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Prokofiev: Alexander Nevsky, Op.78 - 6. Field of the DeadOlga Borodina 5:41£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Prokofiev: Alexander Nevsky, Op.78 - 7. Alexander's entry into PskovValery Gergiev 4:03£0.79  Buy MP3 


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bland and monochrome - no "tingle factor" 11 Feb 2013
By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Gergiev is a variable conductor, sometimes brilliant and sometimes routine; for me, this is an example of him in the latter mode. The cantata "Alexander Nevsky" is one of my favourite choral pieces; I own versions by Schippers and Abbado which for me set the standard. I also very much enjoy the full film score by Temirkanov. These three accounts reek atmosphere, whereas with Gergiev there is definitely something of the perfunctory and unsubtle about his reading: nuances and details go for nought, so there is a complete absence of the scalp-prickling anticipation which the prelude to the Battle on the Ice should create; Gergiev just blasts his way through the music aided and abetted by a rough, raucous Kirov choir.

The best thing here is the solo by Olga Borodina, whose lustrous, soulful mezzo and detailed Russian inflection of the text bid fair to rival the overwhelming pathos of Obratsova for Abbado. I find the supposedly inauthentic LSO chorus to have a far heftier tone and a more impassioned, less-strained command of the high tessitura of the choral part. In addition, I hear no advantage in immediacy resulting from this being a live recording; the whole thing is to me rather tame and just loud without the gradations of dynamics and pacing which distinguish a truly masterful interpretation.

Nor does the filler do much for me; the "Scythian Suite" is a youthful work, derivative of Stravinsky before Prokofiev discovered his own voice; it's noisy, showy and self-consciously "modern" in a manner which is proleptic of Gergiev's rendering of the cantata.

I part company here with other respected reviewers and a glance at the range of opinions in the reviews so far demonstrate that there is no consensus about it - so this is my response, for what it's worth; I remain far more convinced by Abbado, Schippers and Temirkanov - although I have yet to hear the much-lauded Svetlanov live account.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky Cantata has an interesting genesis. The great Russian director Sergei Eisenstein was an artist of no mean talent, and he sketched highly detailed "storyboards" of each planned scene in his films, a practice which he continued into the "talkie" era. Such was his admiration for the music of Prokofiev, that in 1937 he presented these sketches to Prokofiev with instructions to write music inspired by them, around which music he would construct his film. The resultant 1938 film has hardly any dialogue, concentrating instead in often starkly beautiful imagery, and is more than enhanced by the music score. The music had to be adapted post production, and there is a superb recording of the actual film score available under Temirkanov.
The concert piece that Prokofiev prepared can claim therefore to be an original work, not an adapted film score. Indeed, there is music in the cantata which does not feature in the film, most notably the depiction of the Knights sliding through the ice into the frozen lake, which is eerily silent in the film.
I love the story about the planned gala showing of the film in Moscow to visiting dignitaries from Nazi Germany, including von Ribbentrop. As the helmets of the Teutonic Infantry bear an uncanny resemblance to those of the Wehrmacht, and Eisenstein was Jewish, this was intended by Stalin as a "poke in the eye"
However, as to everyone's surprise Ribbentrop proposed and duly signed the infamous non-aggression pact, the film show was cancelled at the last minute and replaced by a performance of Die Walkure at the Bolshoi. In just a few years the film became a rousing paean of patriotism, and Eisenstein was awarded the Order of Stalin in 1941.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Protean Prokofiev 4 Oct 2010
By GlynLuke TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
In the right mood, I only have to think of this recording and I`m itching to hear it again. An hour`s worth of excitement by a Proteus of 20th century classical music. You might not like everything Prokofiev composed - I don`t: the Classical symphony washes over me, and he wrote some unlistenable nationalistic tripe at the behest of the Soviet philistines in power at the time; he & Stalin died the same day in 1953, guess whose death was sidelined? - but he was never predictable and managed to marry modernism with melody. He has been rightly compared to Britten in this respect.
The main draw here is the Cantata, a suite Prokofiev made from his score for Eisenstein`s film Alexander Nevsky. It`s thrilling, often lyrical music, with Gergiev leading the Kirov Orchestra & Chorus (who sound glorious) in a committed performance, with the bonus of mezzo Olga Borodina`s richly authentic singing on the haunting section named Field of the Dead.
The early Scythian Suite is a jaggedly rhythmic joy. The sleeve-notes are a bit sniffy about it, comparing it unfavourably to Stravinsky`s slightly earlier ballet scores. (I`m always oddly surprised to realise that Stravinsky was nine years Prokofiev`s senior; but then he lived much longer too.) If you enjoy, say, the 1812 Overture, or Rite of Spring for that matter, then you may well like this. It`s the classical equivalent of heavy rock, and none the worse for that. Great fun!
Recorded at the first Moscow Easter Festival in 2002 (though one wouldn`t know it was live) this is a crisp & clear souvenir of what must have been a terrific concert.
Recommended.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gergiev's Great Alexander Nevsky and Fine Scythian Suite 24 Jun 2003
By John Kwok - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Gergiev and his Kirov Orchestra are undoubtedly among our finest contemporary interpreters of Prokofiev's music. Their latest recording is the finest Alexander Nevsky I have yet heard. The orchestra truly has Prokofiev's dark Russian score in its blood, providing a dynamic interpretation of this cantata. Soloist Olga Borodina is splendid, singing with much warmth and intensity. Gergiev is noted for his dramatic climaxes and there are plenty to be heard in this vibrant interpretation. The Scythian Suite may not be as swift or as dramatic as Abbado's critically acclaimed interpretation, but Gergiev and the Kirov Orchestra have one which is just as successful. Theirs is a brooding, intense performance which harkens to Stravinsky's Sacre du Printemps. The sound quality is superb for both performances, especially the Alexander Nevsky, which was recorded live in Moscow. Fans of Gergiev and the Kirov Orchestra will not be disappointed with this recording.
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent but unique interpretation 4 Nov 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I have a number of recordings of the Alexander Nevsky (one even narrated by Christopher Plummer, and an excellent recording it is) and I have to admit that it is hard to find a bad recording of the work. There are treasures to find in each one, though the interpretations by the various conductors are quite different. Gergiev brings a very unique interpretation to this work, making it almost as intense as Russian Litergy music. The chorus is just as much a "star" as the orchestra. His approach is gentiler, but no less intense than other interpretation. I find the music extremely moving. Olga Borodina, who sings in only one selection in the entire disk (the field of the dead), so for those buying it for her, you are not going to get a very long time to enjoy her voice, however, what you hear is breathtaking. One thing I really enjoy is she knows the language she is singing. There are other recordings where the mezzo is not Russian, nor is that language naturally her own (even if she does speak it somewhat), and it is so nice to hear subtlies and inflections in the language one often misses. Her voice is very beautiful, and in this case, the fact she stays away from a large heroic sound only adds to the tenderness of the moment.
The ballet suit, Scythian Suite, is quite a departure for Prokofiev. It was written earlier in his career, and yes, at times he sounds more like Stravinsky than Stravinsky does. It is interesting that once he wrote this ballet, and found a voice in that "modernism", he abandoned it. His style from that point on became more traditional (but by no means old fashioned, he was still very much a man of his times). I have only heard one other recording of this piece, so I am not that well versed on it, however, this performance is quite exciting. Perhaps it isn't as "noisy" as some would enjoy, but for me, that is what makes this interpretation exciting. At last, instead of an overwhelming ocean of sound, one has the treat of hearing the delicate impressions made by the various parts of the orchestra. This piece was written for a huge orchestra, and unlike some often think, large doesn't always mean a mish-mash of sound, the orchestra can play very cleanly and every part be heard clearly. Gergiev accomplishes this incredibly well.
My only complaint with this recording comes with the booklet that accompanies the disk. The little essay in the beginning is wonderful, and the translations of the Russian are very good, the problem is the numbering. Within the "libretto" of the Alexander Nevsky one finds little numbers, like we always find in CD recordings. However, unlike we find in most recordings, those numbers do not coordinate with the tracks of the disk. For example: the booklet says that Olga Borodina will sing in 6. However, what do they mean? If you go to track 6 you will not find her there. She is actually singing in track 10. The little numbers in the libretto are not indications of the playing tracks but rather the parts of the work itself. This inconsistency can be momentarily confusing, but it is not impossible to figure out.
One thing I miss in the little booklets is some information on the performers. Some of them, even if sort of well known, are not so well known we know all there is to know about them. I personally don't know much about either Olga Borodina, or Valery Gergiev, nor do I really know much about the Mariinsky Theatre Chorus. For me, I find it adds to the enjoyment of a work when I know a little about the performers. I miss this, and I think it is sad that recording companies will spend tons of pages describing a work we have all heard a million times (that is not the case this time, fortunately) and know the history of as well as we know our own lives, then ignore the fact the performers may be complete strangers to us. The essays, particularly in operas, are often long winded and repetitive (as we have all heard it a billion times -- what new facts can they give about Aida or the Marriage of Figaro, absolutely none) and well, the success of the performance at hand falls one hundred percent on the performers of the moment. It would be so nice if these "new faces" could become familiar to us so we could cherish them as we cherish others in the past.
All in all, an excellent recording (the sound is true and well balanced), the interpretation is exciting, and the accomplishment of the performers is deserving of praise. It is worth the money.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gergiev is great in the Scythian Suite, but he bludgeons Nevsky mercilessly 7 Jun 2009
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Nevsky teeters uneasily on the boundary between classical respectability and Hollywood vulgarity. Shostakovich, for one, thought Prokofiev had gone too far in being loud, bombastic, and obvious. Frankly, I think that the performances which go all out for bombastic fun are the best. But Gergiev, as part of his long-term mission to make Prokofiev into a unassailably great composer, is serious to a fault, hammering home the significance of Nevsky with a bludgeon. Everything about the performance strains to the max: the solo tuba is bigger than all outdoors, the tenors in the chorus threaten to shred their vocal cords, the percussion try to bring down the walls of Jericho. It's spectacle, all right, but a headache is never far off.

The substantial filler, the Scythian Suite, receives exactly the opposite treatment. Gergiev treats it like great music, which by definition has color, nuance, variety, and emotional meaning. Often this score is played like a second-rate assault on the Rite of Spring's barbarism. Gergiev gives the music its own special character, and the results are beautiful, abetted by excellent sound and gorgeous playing form the Kirov Orch.

I will stick with my two favorite Nevskys from Temirkanov and Stokowski, but if I want to hear the Scythian Suite at its best, this is a CD I'll return to.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bland and monochrome - no "tingle factor" 11 Feb 2013
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Gergiev is a variable conductor, sometimes brilliant and sometimes routine; for me, this is an example of him in the latter mode. The cantata "Alexander Nevsky" is one of my favourite choral pieces; I own versions by Schippers and Abbado which for me set the standard. I also very much enjoy the full film score by Temirkanov. These three accounts reek atmosphere, whereas with Gergiev there is definitely something of the perfunctory and unsubtle about his reading: nuances and details go for nought, so there is a complete absence of the scalp-prickling anticipation which the prelude to the Battle on the Ice should create; Gergiev just blasts his way through the music aided and abetted by a rough, raucous Kirov choir.

The best thing here is the solo by Olga Borodina, whose lustrous, soulful mezzo and detailed Russian inflection of the text bid fair to rival the overwhelming pathos of Obratsova for Abbado. I find the supposedly inauthentic LSO chorus to have a far heftier tone and a more impassioned, less-strained command of the high tessitura of the choral part. In addition, I hear no advantage in immediacy resulting from this being a live recording; the whole thing is to me rather tame and just loud without the gradations of dynamics and pacing which distinguish a truly masterful interpretation.

Nor does the filler do much for me; the "Scythian Suite" is a youthful work, derivative of Stravinsky before Prokofiev discovered his own voice; it's noisy, showy and self-consciously "modern" in a manner which is proleptic of Gergiev's rendering of the cantata.

I part company here with other respected reviewers and a glance at the range of opinions in the reviews so far demonstrate that there is no consensus about it - so this is my response, for what it's worth; I remain far more convinced by Abbado, Schippers and Temirkanov - although I have yet to hear the much-lauded Svetlanov live account.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Two Robust Performances of 20th Century Classics !!! 11 Sep 2010
By Oldog_Oltrix - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
OK, a crash course in Alexander Nevsky 101. It was written for the soundtrack of a magnificent 1938 film. There are two versions of the music, (1) performances of the movie soundtrack score and (2) performances of a cantata or suite that Prokofiev wrote summarizing the movie score. This CD has the cantata, not the complete score.

The Scythian Suite similarly is a summary of a ballet score that Prokofiev wrote in 1915. Bold and wild, it stunned audiences and brought ballet music critics kicking and screaming into the 20th century, along with the works of Stravinsky and others. It's a vivid and occasionally breathtaking ride!

There's no better choice for recording dramatic theatrical music than a world-class theatrical orchestra, and the Mariinsky (Kirov) is my choice for leader of the pack. Conductor Valery Gergiev is a razor-sharp interpreter of Prokofiev's theatrical works, and this is THE recording to own for state-of-the-art performances of both of Prokofiev's abbreviated compositions! The highly-regarded recordings of the 20th century sound a bit tired and dated compared to these presentations by Gergiev and his performers!

FWIW, for the complete movie score (not just the cantata) the Alexander Nevsky recording to own is the magnificent 1995 recording by Yuri Temirkinov and the St. Petersburg Philharmonic! It's about as close to a live performance as I have ever experienced using my modest but carefully-selected sound system.

Interesting but not surprising that today's two finest Alexander Nevsky recordings should both come from the musicians of St. Petersburg.
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