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Professional C# [Paperback]

Simon Robinson , Christian Nagel , Karli Watson , Morgan Skinner , Jay Glynn , Zach Greenvoss , Scott Allen , Burt Harvey , Ollie Cornes
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

1 Mar 2002
It is no exaggeration to describe the C# language and its associated environment, the .NET Framework, as the most important new technology for developers in many years. .NET provides a new environment within which you can develop almost any Windows-based or web-based application, while C# is a new programming language designed specifically to work with .NET.


Entirely revised and updated for the Golden Release of .NET, Professional C# 2nd Edition is the ideal introduction to the C# language and the .NET Framework, and will become an indispensable companion for any user of C# and .NET.


Offering an unparalleled breadth and depth of coverage, this book provides the information that you need to learn the key concepts of the C# language, and then takes you on to a complete exploration of programming the .NET Framework with C#, so that you are ready to develop powerful C# applications in the .NET environment.
Topics covered include:


How to program in the object-oriented C# language

Writing Windows applications and Windows services

Writing web pages and web services with ASP.NET

Manipulating XML using C#

Understanding .NET Assemblies

Using ADO.NET to access databases

Integration with COM, COM+, and Active Directory

Distributed applications with .NET Remoting

Generating graphics, and printing documents using C#

Accessing the Internet with C#, and network programming

Handling files and the Registry, and controlling .NET security


Product details

  • Paperback: 1270 pages
  • Publisher: WROX Press Ltd; 2nd Revised edition edition (1 Mar 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1861007043
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861007049
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 18.7 x 6.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,753,150 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

From the Publisher

This book is aimed at experienced developers, probably coming from a C++, Java, or VB background, but no previous experience of C# or .NET programming is assumed.


This book will provide the ideal introduction to writing C# programs on the .NET Framework for developers who are serious about C#, and want all the facts, now.


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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I own three books on C# and have read another two on this topic too, but when I look back for for few months I realized that from all these book I used *this* book almost exclusively when I need some info or some example with regards to C#.
Well, maybe "Programming C#" by Jesse Liberty (O'Reilly) or "Beginning C#" by Karli Watson (WROX) are better books if one is about learning C# and have no professional experience with VB6, Delphi, C++ or Java, but for experienced programmer I really recommend to pick this book.
What I like on this book:
- it is comprehesive. It is big plus for me that I can find here useful info about almost any aspect of C# programming from working with base library classes, through DataAcess to Remoting or Security.
- Practical style of writing with many concrete and usable examples
- Coverage of topics that you hardly find elsewhere. For example, there is very good coverage of working with Active Directory, materials about creating Windows Services or material on working with GDI+.
- Very nice coverage of some advanced topics, such as coverage of memory managenent or garbage collection.
What can be better:
- sometime this book is not so easy to follow, if one just learn C# basics. Starting chapters are somewhat long and there is assumed that reader has some knowledge about programming concepts. But as I wrote this is not book for those who just starts with programming.
- There should be imho more info on some topics such as on COM+ Services or on Web Services. I know there are other books on this, but these chapters can be better.
To summarize, if you are experienced programmer and look for solid, practical C# book with many examples (as an addition to C# Reference documentation) then I really recommend pick up this one.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Generally good with some confusing areas 6 Jun 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The book acts as a good introduction to C# for developers with a C++ or Java background. It covers all major areas of the language but only at an introductory level in some parts despite its 1200+ pages. The reader will be buying further specialized texts if they wish to produce production quality applications. Minor quibbles generally exist around a lack of explanation in some areas. For example, The operator list (P. 78) has a note '...should be familiar to C and C++ developers'. Doesn't do a lot for the Java contingent ! - would a brief description of each been too difficult ?. I feel the book has suffered in the race to market but it is still the best of the current crop. 3rd Edition please ?
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good all rounder 30 Jan 2003
Format:Paperback
A good grounding in C#, as well as some general .NET topics, such as ADO.NET and Assemblies in good detail. With plenty of information to get you started, it will give you the know-how to progress in to the advanced topics needed to develop professional software solutions.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 out of 5 stars  38 reviews
30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book, based on certain expectations. 11 Sep 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Talk about a tough (and HUGE) subject to cover! Well, I bought this book for two reasons (1) to get a better understanding of C#, and (2) to serve as a starting point for passing the C# for Windows exam. The book served both purposes very well. I read this text cover to cover with the exception of 4 out of 23 chapters.
I saw another review of this book that said something like "1300 page cursory overview" Well, you're probably right. But, I challenge anyone out there to find a book that covers every aspect of .NET that's less that 5,000 pages. Here are a few examples:
1.) There's a chapter on security (there are entire books on the subject)
2.) There's a chapter on ASP (there are entire books on the subject)
3.) There's a chapter on web services (there are entire books on the subject)
4.) There's a chapter on XML (there are entire books on the subject)
5.) There's two chapters on ADO .NET (there are entire books on the subject)
You get my point. This material adds up, and anyone expecting in-depth coverage of everything in 1300 pages should get a reality check. Unfortunately, to really get a grasp on .NET you're going to have to shell out for more books. (So far I have C# in general, web services, and ADO covered. The next purchase will be an ASP .NET book) Can you see where I'm going here? Professional C# is kind of an umbrella for all of the other books. Now, where I find this book does a nice job by itself (not requiring another text) is as follows:
1.) Nice job explaining the C# language itself (including some of the more advanced datatypes), as well as how it implements OO principles.
2.) Nice job explaining what and how the framework is constructed, as well as how a .NET application is constructed.
3.) Focuses mostly on the client-server (windows as opposed to web) side of development.
4.) ADO coverage is enough to get you productive.
There are a LOT of other good features of the book. And most of the subject areas covered provide an adequate presentation of the material. A couple of exceptions are ASP and security. I realize that a book on C# must at least touch on these topics, but it probably could have just left those chapters out. Buy another book. (35 pages on ASP .NET? Don't bother!)
I can't say if it's too advanced for some users. I've never purchased a "beginning" series book by Wrox, I alway go for the "professional". The only thing I would have expected them to do a better job on beacuse you can't really get a separate book on the subject, is deployment.
Anyhoo, I think this is a great book for the purpose for which it was intended. If it was 5,000 pages long, I would have given it 5 stars. For the most part, Wrox usually does a good job. Remember, there are NO silver bullets with .NET books. Unfortunately you're going to have to get at least 4 titles to cover everything well.
Bottom Line: If this is your first .NET book, it's worth it. It was my fourth, and it's still worth it. If you need to take it to the next level, you'll need more than one book - no matter which one you get first.
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, worth for those who want to learn 15 Sep 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is packed with knowledge. Every page is worth its weight in gold. I read it from cover to cover. Re-doing EVERY exercise manually. Trust me, I know what I'm saying.
I worked with the 1st Edition. Took me 8 months to finish the book thorougly. Yes there is some mistakes and typos. But if you understand the text, you can correct these mistakes easily. As a reward, the exercises I redo is always better than the book's ones.
Some persons complaint that there's too much authors resulting in style discrepancy and the chapters slightly overlap their introduction. Yes it's true. And I found that it's rather a GREAT advantage. Just because each author gives you the best of their expertise. Do you think an author of ASP.NET could give you detailed explanation all the intricacies of the C# & .NET runtime environment?
The repetition of some concepts is not really a waste, this book is advanced. I found that it's rather good. Actually, I found this book doesn't have enough pages. Sometime I can't do better than 3 pages a day.
The chapters related to the .NET and C# language fundamental (Chapter 1 to 10) and advanced techniques (File IO, ASDI, COM+, GDI+, .NET Remoting, Windows Services and Security) are simply wonderful. They represent +80% of the book. I rated the ADO.NET and XML chapters 4 stars. The weakest part is ASP.NET, Web Services. I wish the author had choosen a simpler example and add may be few more chapters. The chapter on Custom Control is OK. In anyway, I can't blame the author, to get serious on ASP.NET, you'd rather buy a specific book.
I particularly like the side notes and the Appendix giving a background comparison C# and traditional languages (C++, Java, VB).
If you expect from this book a collection of recipes of code ready for cut and paste, then you will be likely disappointed. This book is for those who are willing to LEARN. The C# language and OOP concept itself is not that difficult. It's rather the .NET Framework itself and how to use wisely the wealth of its base classes.
One reviewer said "too many authors who don't know their stuff". Not true, while I was redoing the exercise, I perceived the style of each of them. Generally they're good. And when needed, the authors answer to my emails. I'm an experienced programmer, when something is bad, I can see it easily.
I come from a VB + ASP background, thanks to this book, I now have a pretty solid knowledge of .NET and a pure style C# programmer. I have had hard time to grasp the whole stuff but now I can tell you that I'm happy to leave the VB world.
I wholeheartly recommend this book to anyone who want to learn C# _AND_ how to make useful application with it. Be courageous, spend some time, you won't be disappointed.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Enough 14 July 2002
By Chris Barmonde - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
    Among the programming books that I have read, I have noticed that there tend to be two specific types: tutorials and references. Tutorials are step-by-step books (Deitel comes to mind) which progress from beginning to end comprehensively. References are simply books that you can look something up if needs be. With Professional C#, Wrox has managed to combine the two genres into a very workable format.
    A note to those who would opt for this book: There is a Beginning C# book by Wrox that would be more suited to those who have little background in programming. As for Professional, the only requirements that seem to be needed are a sound understanding of general programming practices. From there, the book explains itself. It helps by relating C# concepts to their Java, C++, and Visual Basic counterparts, so those with experience in those three fields will find this book a much easier text to read.
    Now on to the actual content of the book, all 1200-plus pages of it! The book starts out with a fairly in-depth analysis and explanation of what the .NET Framework is and why you should care at all. Through the next four chapters, the concepts, syntax, and Base Classes are introduced. This is where I believe the `tutorial' part of the book comes in. Reading these chapters in order would be a wise thing to do, in my opinion as a somewhat-but-not-totally-experienced programmer. Each topic flows nicely into the next and provides easy and understandable reading, chock-full of examples and code-snippets. As I mentioned before, many of these topics are related back to Java, C++, and VB, making concepts easier to grasp.
    Once you have finished reading through those five chapters, the book in its entirety turns into a `reference' book. There isn't any specific order you should read through. You can simply pick a topic and read up on it. Wrox offers a myriad of topics throughout the 23 chapters in the book including a tutorial of the Visual Studio .NET environment, working with C# on ASP.NET pages, other web services, graphics, remoting, security, and many more. The scope of the book is definitely large as Wrox attempts to cram in as much C# and .NET knowledge as is humanly possible.
    So is this book sufficient for programmers looking to get started with C#? Most definitely. This book is excellent as either a tutorial or a reference and covers nearly every topic you could imagine. However, it also has its problems.
    The main problem I have with this book is simply the fact that it has no class index. There is no place to just `look up' what classes have what methods and properties and the such. In addition, when new classes are introduced throughout the text, many of the methods are given, but their signatures are not! The first example that comes to mind is the String class section in Chapter 5: The book lists a few of the methods of the String class (not all of them, however), but all they give are the names of the methods. How am I supposed to use these methods if I don't know how they work? Many of them are seemingly intuitive, and you can find all the information through Microsoft's MSDN, but many programmers these days want a book they can reference when they have a problem. The way that it is set up, this book would fail miserably at the task.
    Another problem is that the examples tend to be a little `shallow'. The code snippets are definitely useful, but only after studying them for a few minutes to see exactly what is going on. The context of the examples could definitely be a lot better.
    Finally, just a minor little problem: There tends to be a more-than-necessary number of spelling and syntactical errors, the former more than the latter. While this isn't a huge problem, I encountered so many spelling and grammatical errors that I honestly believe that running it through Word's spell and grammar checkers probably would have alleviated many of the problems. The syntax errors are few and far between, but they are still evident. With a book that is over 1200 pages in size with as many authors as this has, it is definitely acceptable to have these kinds of mistakes. But I still believe it could have been edited a bit more thoroughly.
    Despite its few faux pas, the book as a whole is an excellent resource that any and every C# programmer should have. Even without full class and method signatures, using the book as a reference is easy to do and should be done. It covers many topics in-depth that other C# books have failed to mention, especially when it comes to web services and programming. Professional C# 2nd Edition is certainly on my recommended list.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 1200+ pages full of practical info about how-to use C# 3 Jun 2002
By "slavof" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
First, I must admit that I like this book, and I found that it is very useful to me.
I own three books on C# and have read another two on this topic too, but when I look back for for few months I realized that from all these book I used *this* book almost exclusively when I need some info or some example with regards to C#.
Well, maybe "Programming C#" by Jesse Liberty (O'Reilly) or "Beginning C#" by Karli Watson (WROX) are better books if one is about learning C# and have no professional experience with VB6, Delphi, C++ or Java, but for experienced programmer I really recommend to pick this book.
What I like on this book:
- it is comprehesive. It is big plus for me that I can find here useful info about almost every aspect of C# programming from working with base library classes, through DataAcess to Remoting or Security.
- Practical style of writing with many concrete and usable examples that works with release version of .NET.
- Coverage of topics that you hardly find elsewhere. For example, there is very good coverage of working with Active Directory or materials about creating Windows Services.
- Very nice coverage of some advanced topics, such as coverage of memory managenent or garbage collection.
What can be better:
- sometime this book is not so easy to follow, if one just learn C# basics. Starting chapters are somewhat long and there is assumed that reader has some knowledge about programming concepts. But as I wrote this is not book for those who just starts with programming.
- There should be imho more info on some topics such as on COM+ Services or on Web Services. I know there are other books on this, but these chapters can be better.
To summarize, if you are experienced programmer and look for solid, practical C# book with many examples (as an addition to C# Reference documentation) then I really recommend pick up this one.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Source for Learning C# and the .NET Framework 16 Jun 2002
By Steven Potter - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Wrox comes through with another great book! I was looking for something that would help me learn Windows GUI for an independent studies course and so I leaned on my past experiences with Wrox Books (Beginning/Professional Active Server Pages 3.0, Beginning PHP4, Beginning ASP Databases, Beginning XML, Beginning JavaScript), which had always been a good experience to say the least. If you want to learn a language for programming in the .NET environment then this is the book for you.
However, I do suggest some background experience with programming or understanding the concepts behind programming languages. Even though this book does provide excellent explanations of the topics, I think I understood concepts more easily because I've had two years of programming in C++ under my belt. Not that you need to be an experienced programmer! However, it would be good to know a little something beforehand. Otherwise, I suggest checking out the Beginning C# book which might be a little better suited for non-programmers looking to break into the realm of programming. C# really is a lot easier to understand as a starting language than C++ because Microsoft put in a lot of effort into making the language easy to use without having to know all the perplexing C routines for programming in the Win32 API.
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