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Professional DCOM Application Development Paperback – Illustrated, Jun 1998


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Product details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: WROX Press Ltd; illustrated edition edition (Jun. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1861001312
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861001313
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 18.3 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,327,427 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

Synopsis

Professional DCOM Application Development is for experienced C++ programmers who have heard that Microsoft may be getting there at last, and want to get up to speed. It is for people in a hurry, who wish to get to grips with all the issues involved as quickly as possible. These are the kind of people who are not afraid to get their hands dirty, and will leap into the sample code before they're half way through the chapter. To be frank, they are probably the sort of people who download the sample code when it first appears on the Wrox Press site, before the book even hits the bookstores. There is currently no one resource that provides this sort of information. The general approach seems to be to teach people how to use DCOM as a technology for distributing clever ActiveX controls to a wide audience. However, Microsoft's goal is somewhat broader than that, and the major thrust of NT5 is to make the OS a platform for building serious enterprise-wide applications. We are moving away from the desktop into back-office territory here." Who is this Book for? Experienced C++ Programmers who've had some exposure to COM or CORBA.

From the Author

Not just another COM/DCOM book
Let’s start by getting one thing straight. "Professional DCOM Application Development" isn’t just another COM/DCOM book. When I sat down to write this book, I wasn’t interested in selling the idea of distributed components – there are plenty of books that do that already. And I didn’t really want to waste valuable space explaining the underlying theory of COM (or indeed ATL) – there are plenty of excellent books that do that, too.

No, what I really wanted to do was move on and explore the $64000 question: can we construct our entire back-office around Windows NT? Does Windows NT have the technological basis to support all of our potential applications?

Did I say $64000? Make that $64 billion.

Why DCOM, though? Well, you can’t explore Microsoft’s back-office without encountering COM (their Component Object Model) pretty early on, and if you’re interested in real, grown-up, distributed systems, then you’re bound to come across Distributed COM, or DCOM. DCOM is very much the engine that powers Microsoft’s back-office war machine.

So in the book, I take an in-depth practical look at how we can build real, grown-up, distributed systems using all the technologies based around DCOM, from pure DCOM through to MTS and MSMQ, with side orders of Active Directory, Clusters and MMC.

Oh, and what was the answer to my original question? Does Windows NT have the technological basis to support all of our potential applications?

Well, maybe. Just maybe. But perhaps you’d better read the book and make your own mind up.

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 Sept. 1998
Format: Paperback
This is probably the only volume for C++ programmers currently available in the market that covers DCOM, MTS, MSMQ, Clusters and MS Management, Monitoring and Control. Nowhere else can you find a more comprehensive discussion about using MSMQ with MTS especially if you prefer coding your COM controls using ATL in C++. Most of the DCOM code is developed on ATL using C++ and are tested out by calling them using applications written in VB. The appendix contains a comprehensive DCOM troubleshooting guide too. Professional MS Distributed Component Architecture would probably have been a better name for the book
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By A Customer on 2 Mar. 1999
Format: Paperback
The book provides very good introduction to MTS, MSMQ, MMC, NT Security and Monitoring. The author also gave some valuable ideas/implementations of MBV (Marshal By Value) which is very pratical for those DCOM people with "limited bandwidth". The code fragment are instructive and good enough to get you started to customize your own project or at least to give you the idea where to start. The server parts were unanimously coded in Visual C++ with ATL, most of client parts were coded in Visual Basic, though it is not my favorite language, the author does have insight on this useage. (It is simply simpler than MFC to work with GUI development) I personaly would not count on something (or some features) which are still in Beta (NT5.0) and may not even show up when released and I would like to let Microsoft to handle the hard part such as MSDTC. With the ATL3.0, some implementations might be changed a bit, but that should be very trivial. Overall, to C++ programmer working with COM/DCOM, this is a good book to hold with.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Feb. 1999
Format: Paperback
Based on both the code fragments and explanations, this book seemed hastily thrown together and showed little insight. I am fearful that developers will try to implement DTC resource managers based on the information found in this book.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 July 1999
Format: Paperback
I want to know some thing about COM DCOM. I wanted a brief detail about them. Could you provide some?
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A Tad Tedious 18 Jan. 2000
By mark colbath - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This guide gets a bit too wordy with anecdotal comments. I have little patience when I am trying to learn a new form of development. I would have preferred that the author got to the point with fewer words. Also, I would prefer that the samples be more practical/predictable. This way, I can focus on DCOM instead of trying to determine what else is new about a code fragment. Case in point; kidnapper/ransom transaction application versus traditional bank money transfer app.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Should really be called "Win32 Enterprise Primer" 16 May 2000
By James Wann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The title of this book is deceiving. Writing enterprise software for Win32 involves a lot of COM based technology. This book is an excellent introduction for all these technologies provided that the person already has some fundamental knowledge of basic COM (Hence the "Professional" in the title). I have not seen a better book out there that both addresses the technologies AND has working samples of those technologies. Most COM/DCOM/COM+ books out there today start with rehashes of Dale Rogerson's Inside COM book... I am tired of seeing all the books out there that has the exact same explanation of connection points, the exact explanation of IUnknown, and basically the exact same 3 introductory chapters!. Learning COM is a two-pronged process. First, you must be able to get comfortable with the technology (hence, Rogerson's book), then you have to learn the services built around the technology (This book does that!). I can see why this book got such poor reviews, because those people reading the book were not ready for the onslaught of information in this book (believe me, there's more useful information in these 400+ pages than there is in most 600-1000+ page COMeverything books).
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Interesting book 2 Mar. 2000
By Jack - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is a "professional" Dcom book and it could be very difficult for COM beginners. The book touched many advanced features with practical examples that can not be found in other COM/DCOM books. One must have at least intermediate level knowledge before opening this book. That is why I only read the book after I bought the book one year later. Many topics it introduced can be applied to industry directly. However, I sometimes found myself could not make some components right by following author's instructions, although the examples from the wrox download site work just fine.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Broad coverage, good introduction 2 Mar. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The book provides very good introduction to MTS, MSMQ, MMC, NT Security and Monitoring. The author also gave some valuable ideas/implementations of MBV (Marshal By Value) which is very pratical for those DCOM people with "limited bandwidth". The code fragment are instructive and good enough to get you started to customize your own project or at least to give you the idea where to start. The server parts were unanimously coded in Visual C++ with ATL, most of client parts were coded in Visual Basic, though it is not my favorite language, the author does have insight on this useage. (It is simply simpler than MFC to work with GUI development) I personaly would not count on something (or some features) which are still in Beta (NT5.0) and may not even show up when released and I would like to let Microsoft to handle the hard part such as MSDTC. With the ATL3.0, some implementations might be changed a bit, but that should be very trivial. Overall, to C++ programmer working with COM/DCOM, this is a good book to hold with.
quite a mouth full. 24 Sept. 2000
By Amazon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
If you are the kind of people who wish to download source code as it first appears on the web and if you are the kind of people in a hurry to get into the act with all the issues as soon as possible, then this book is for you.
The author have not stopped with explaining COM, DCOM and all other technologies as a toolkit. He has shown how to put them all to use in building real solutions to real problem. I liked the way he had simulated the scenario when you face trouble, when you start building systems that stretch over an entire enterprise, and how things get more complicated, and how difficult it become to deliver flexible, reliable and timely solutions.
If you are starting a new project which involves C++, ATL, COM, DCOM and other technologies like MTS, MSMQ and IIS, and if you use services of ADO, then with this book you are already there into the next phase of your project.
I would have given a four star if this book have not dealt with some of the topics which I think it is premature to implement in the industry when the services are actually in their beta release.
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