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Product details

  • Paperback: 552 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; 1 edition (1 Jun 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1118183487
  • ISBN-13: 978-1118183489
  • Product Dimensions: 18.8 x 2.5 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 453,578 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

From the Back Cover

Exploit the rich set of Android sensors to build fully aware apps If you want to create truly amazing apps for Android, you must know how to take advantage of all of its capabilities. This book helps you achieve this by arming you with the knowledge and code you need to put Android′s sensors to good use. From determining the smartphone′s location and interpreting physical sensors to handling images, audio, and recognizing speech, you′ll learn how to effectively apply the sensor– related APIs. With this information, you′ll not only save time during the development process but you′ll also be able to build fully featured apps that integrate new levels of interaction and automation. Professional Android Sensor Programming: Shows various ways to implement location tracking and proximity alerts Uncovers the physics behind the physical sensors available in the SensorManager API so you can know how to apply them appropriately Shows algorithm code to interpret noisy sensor data and detect changes Demonstrates how to measure device properties like orientation and movement, as well as environmental properties like relative altitude Explores using Android Open Accessory (AOA) to access external sensors Describes Near Field Communication (NFC) technology and its APIs Provides image and signal processing code to detect patterns captured by the camera and microphone Exposes all components required to create reliable, user–friendly, speech–enabled apps using Android Speech Recognition and Text–to–Speech APIs Wrox Professional guides are written by working developers to address everyday needs. They provide examples, practical solutions, and expert education in new technologies, all designed to help programmers do a better job. wrox.com Programmer Forums Join our Programmer to Programmer forums to ask and answer programming questions about this book, join discussions on the hottest topics in the industry, and connect with fellow programmers from around the world. Code Downloads Take advantage of free code samples from this book, as well as code samples from hundreds of other books, all ready to use. Read More Find articles, ebooks, sample chapters, and tables of contents for hundreds of books, and more reference resources on programming topics that matter to you.

About the Author

Greg Milette is a professional Android developer and founder of Gradison Technologies, an app development company. He enjoys building practical apps like Digital Recipe Sidekick and contributing to StackOverflow. Adam Stroud is the lead developer for the Android version of RunKeeper. He is a self–proclaimed "phandroid" and is an active participant in the Android virtual community on StackOverflow and Android Google groups.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 25 Oct 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book mainly because I am interested in speech technology. There are a few useful tutorials on the web about how to implement a basic app that you can say something to and that says something in response, but this is the most comprehensive account of Android speech technologies available - 5 chapters in all, making up Part IV of the book.
Chapter 15 is about designing a speech-enabled app, looking at different voice action types and discussing issues in voice user interface (VUI) design - a useful guide for those not familiar with the differences between designing for GUIs and for VUIs, with all the associated problems of speech recognition errors and other issues of usability.
The next chapter presents an extremely readable and comprehensive account of the two main technologies - Text-to-Speech and Speech Recognition - covering all the information from the Android API documentation but also providing sample code to allow the reader to build a simple app. The main benefit of this chapter is that it gives a detailed and clearly presented explanation of all aspects of the APIs and shows how they can be used in a working app.
The remaining chapters cover new ground that to my knowledge is not available elsewhere. Chapter 17 provides a detailed account of how to match the recognised words spoken by the user to a set of desired inputs, using established techniques such as word spotting, stemming, and phonetic indexing, and covering command words in persistent storage as well as multi-part commands. Chapter 18 provides extensive code for developing an app with multi-turn voice actions, including methods for responding when recognition fails, while chapter 19 covers different ways of implementing speech activation as alternatives to pressing a `speak' button or mic icon.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Exciting new book on Android sensors and speech technology 25 Oct 2012
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I bought this book mainly because I am interested in speech technology. There are a few useful tutorials on the web about how to implement a basic app that you can say something to and that says something in response, but this is the most comprehensive account of Android speech technologies available - 5 chapters in all, making up Part IV of the book.
Chapter 15 is about designing a speech-enabled app, looking at different voice action types and discussing issues in voice user interface (VUI) design - a useful guide for those not familiar with the differences between designing for GUIs and for VUIs, with all the associated problems of speech recognition errors and other issues of usability.
The next chapter presents an extremely readable and comprehensive account of the two main technologies - Text-to-Speech and Speech Recognition - covering all the information from the Android API documentation but also providing sample code to allow the reader to build a simple app. The main benefit of this chapter is that it gives a detailed and clearly presented explanation of all aspects of the APIs and shows how they can be used in a working app.
The remaining chapters cover new ground that to my knowledge is not available elsewhere. Chapter 17 provides a detailed account of how to match the recognised words spoken by the user to a set of desired inputs, using established techniques such as word spotting, stemming, and phonetic indexing, and covering command words in persistent storage as well as multi-part commands. Chapter 18 provides extensive code for developing an app with multi-turn voice actions, including methods for responding when recognition fails, while chapter 19 covers different ways of implementing speech activation as alternatives to pressing a `speak' button or mic icon. These chapters will be very useful for speech technology enthusiasts who wish to develop real apps to accomplish useful tasks rather than simply recognising a single input and speaking back a simple phrase.
Of course, there are many other topics covered in the book, showing how to build apps for the many device sensors available on Android devices - locational, physical (e.g. temperature, pressure, light, acceleration, etc.), cameras, and microphones. Now that I have experimented with speech technology in Part IV, I am looking forward to getting to grips with these sensors in the near future.
To accompany the book there are free code samples - part of an open source project called Great Android Sensing Project (GAST) - that can be downloaded from the Wrox web site and tweaked and modified to develop realistic apps. There is also an app called Android Sensing Playground that can be downloaded from Google Play. This app covers most of the examples discussed in the book and, more interestingly, allows various parameter settings to be adjusted to allow the user to observe in detail how the APIs work.
Finally, a brief comment on the style of the authors of this exciting book. Most Android books discuss a range of techniques and methods and then provide code to illustrate. A big plus of this book is that the authors go beyond this and give explanations and motivations for why things are done in particular ways, so that the developer ends up with a much richer learning experience.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Just what I needed 7 Jun 2012
By JP - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
With this book, developers who create apps that use sensors, GPS, camera and audio can expect to be able to save themselves hours of frustration trying to figure stuff out. As an example, given Google's lacking documentation, figuring out how to correctly calculate azimuth/pitch/roll from TYPE_ROTATION_VECTOR is a pain. Locate the relevant information in the book, and it turns out pretty simple. As a side effect, the reader can expect to use sensors with confidence, and be able to convey their limitations to clients with authority.
I like how the book is balanced. Skip across the chapters and skim off the conceptual stuff, then follow the drill-down in each chapter as needed. The book does this without going off on an academic tangent.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Keys to the Secret Kingdom of Android 3 Mar 2013
By Robin T. Wernick - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a long time programmer I can tell you that failure to master a given programming venue spells disaster. Far too many shops and individuals have fallen short of their promise by saying 'just this much'. Just this much skill, or just this much competence will be fine with the clients. Then the competition steps up the standard and they become failures.

"Professional Android Sensor Programming" is the final book that will free you from the momentous job of finding out how to make these fantastic sensors work for you. How can you get location, near field, acceleration, and light to make your application come alive? It's right here, just read the book. It made my work for a navigation and plotting application about ten times easier.

OK, it doesn't cover Bluetooth or Wi-FI, and it doesn't help you find location accuracy to 10 cm( some phones can do this, but not iPhone ). You will find those areas covered in "Professional Android 4 Application Development" and "Android Wireless Application Development"..Of course, you will always find that some exercises are left for the student.

So, now that you know that these three books cover the gamut of Android programming fundamentals, why don't you take a good run at it and cover what you need to know. I especially liked what the book had to say about 'voice recognition'. I knew a few basics from my background, but here is the best introduction to making your application into a real assistant that I have seen in print. Imagine how your application will be received when your audience can talk to it! Imagine saying, "Droid, target nearest gas station, display one mile map" and have your application pop the map up on your car's navigational display. "Scotty; beam me up" is just around the corner.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
You must have a look this book if want to be real Android Programmer. 30 May 2013
By Jaeha Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book doesn't explain basic of Android programming, but if want to make something interesting which may use device sensor like GPS, you must read this book. It's well explain about the basic technics and example is easy to follow. Recommend to every Android programmer from beginner to expert.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
good book, well explained technical content 4 May 2013
By Carlos Morales - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
good book, well explained technical content
t's a good book, I find it useful to begin writing applications android NFC sensors
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