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The Law and Procedure of the International Court of Justice: Fifty Years of Jurisprudence Hardcover – 21 Feb 2013

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 2032 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (21 Feb. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199668256
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199668250
  • Product Dimensions: 25.1 x 10.4 x 18.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,517,336 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

About the Author

Hugh Thirlway was Principal Legal Secretary to the International Court of Justice from 1989 to 1994, and has since been Professor of International Law at the Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva, Visiting Professor to Bristol University, and Visiting Professor to the University of Leiden.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Phillip Taylor TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 30 Oct. 2013
Format: Hardcover
Length: 0:30 Mins

OF THE WORK OF THE INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

Recently published by the Oxford University Press, these two volumes on the diverse work of the International Court of Justice are actually a compilation of a series of articles published in the British Year Book of International Law between 1989 and 2011. These, according to the author, were intended as a continuation of the series of articles by Sir Gerald Fitzmaurice in the Year Book from 1950 to 1963. It is also pointed out that Sir Gerald's study came to an end when he himself was elected as a judge of the ICJ in1960 and was therefore not able to comment in the same way on its decisions.

What this current two-volume work therefore achieves is to assemble the salient articles logically and systematically into a complete edition. The author, Hugh Thirlway, who has been intimately involved with the work of the ICJ, has certainly succeeded in his stated aim to make this body of work more accessible `in a form in which the relationships between the various subjects examined and the chronological development of the Court's case-law would be more evident.'

Here then, within two volumes and over 2,000 pages, is an overview of the law and the procedures of the International Court of Justice, over some fifty years of its history. The book thus reveals the development of international legal rules based, in large part, on decisions and on treaties which have originated with the Court.
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Amazon.com: 1 review
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
An in-depth overview.... 30 Oct. 2013
By Phillip Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover

OF THE WORK OF THE INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

Recently published by the Oxford University Press, these two volumes on the diverse work of the International Court of Justice are actually a compilation of a series of articles published in the British Year Book of International Law between 1989 and 2011. These, according to the author, were intended as a continuation of the series of articles by Sir Gerald Fitzmaurice in the Year Book from 1950 to 1963. It is also pointed out that Sir Gerald's study came to an end when he himself was elected as a judge of the ICJ in1960 and was therefore not able to comment in the same way on its decisions.

What this current two-volume work therefore achieves is to assemble the salient articles logically and systematically into a complete edition. The author, Hugh Thirlway, who has been intimately involved with the work of the ICJ, has certainly succeeded in his stated aim to make this body of work more accessible `in a form in which the relationships between the various subjects examined and the chronological development of the Court's case-law would be more evident.'

Here then, within two volumes and over 2,000 pages, is an overview of the law and the procedures of the International Court of Justice, over some fifty years of its history. The book thus reveals the development of international legal rules based, in large part, on decisions and on treaties which have originated with the Court.

Examining the work of the ICJ with care and detail, this monumental work could be regarded as the basis of the first real attempt to evolve a set of international rules founded on the jurisprudential implications of its work over what has proved to be a highly significant period of legal history.

This formidable work of reference is organised first into sections and then into categories labelled as `divisions'. Note these in the two tables of contents: one a summary, the other detailed -- a useful feature in itself.

To cite only a few examples, the first volume includes a section on general principles and sources of law, as well as treaty interpretation and other issues, including substantive law and questions of jurisdiction and competence and of procedure. Volume II examines similarly diverse material under similar categories. Also note here the highly interesting division on the Law of the Sea which covers such subject areas as maritime spaces, delimitation and much more.

With its numerous references to case law, its extensive footnoting and detailed index, this is primarily a highly technical and eminently useful work of reference for international lawyers keen to develop a broader and certainly deeper understanding of this complex and evolving area of law. With all this and its extensive tables of cases and statutory instruments, this two-volume work should be regarded as a highly useful addition to the international lawyer's library. The publication date is 2013.
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