FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Problem of Slavery in... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: xiv, 505 p. ; 21 cm.. . Originally published: Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 1966. Includes bibliographical references and index. The top edge of the page block is foxed.The corners of the soft cover are creased.There is a stamp in blue ink on the front free end paper reading Transatlantic Films distribution and productionco.Ltd.Contents otherwise clean and unmarked.
Trade in your item
Get a £2.74
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (Oxford Paperbacks) Paperback – 20 Oct 1988


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.00
£12.46 £6.68
£14.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (Oxford Paperbacks) + The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Emancipation
Price For Both: £44.00

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £2.74
Trade in The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (Oxford Paperbacks) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.74, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 520 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; New Ed edition (20 Oct. 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195056396
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195056396
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 2.7 x 13.5 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 830,957 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

`Immensely learned, readable, disturbing.' New York Review of Books

About the Author

Sterling Professor of History at Yale, author of Slavery and Human Progress (OUP 1984, Cloth; 1986, Paper)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
AMERICANS have often been embarrassed when reminded that the Declaration of Independence was written by a slaveholder and that Negro slavery was a legal institution in all thirteen colonies at the beginning of the Revolution. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Powerful Book 21 April 2014
By Frank S Warner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even though this is a scholarly book, it is very readable. What I learned about slavery is that the thinking that perpetuated it for many thousands of years is still with us. Slavery flourished long before Classical Greece. Then Aristotle "reasoned" that some people were meant to be slaves. It became the norm in Western Culture. Most people believed this was just the way the world worked. This view was never seriously challenged until the mid eighteenth century. The book taught me that just because something is a tradition, be it religious or otherwise, does not make it right. It also taught me that the we as a culture have not yet overcome slavery.
7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HISTORY FOR HISTORIANS 30 Sept. 2007
By Barrie W. Bracken - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
THIS IS A GREAT BOOK IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN THE SUBJECT OF SLAVERY AND ANTI-SLAVERY. THE AUTHOR, WITHOUT QUESTION ONE OF OUR GREATEST HISTORIANS OF THE SUBJECT, GOES BEYOND THE ARTIFICIAL LINE OF THE CALANDER IN RELATION TO OUR CIVIL WAR AND OFFERS AN INSIGHTFUL VIEW OF THE EFFECT OF SLAVERY IN THE PERIOD LEADING UP TO THE FOUNDING OF OUR COUNTRY. tHIS IS A GREAT BOOK FOR THE SERIOUS STUDENT, NOT FOR THE CASUAL READER.
4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Emphasis is on intellectual history 4 Mar. 2014
By John Karon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As other reviewers say, this scholarly book emphasizes intellectual history and attitudes (including Christian justification) toward slavery. The author describes the beliefs of Greek philosophers most of us will never have heard of, writings of English, French, and German philosophers, justifications for slavery in the bible, justifications based on Christian beliefs. He traces the gradual development of abolitionist thought. The author will refer back to a philosopher or person whose beliefs were mentioned chapters ago, with only a very brief summary of those beliefs. He provides very limited information on legislation related to slavery and the actual conduct of slavery, but information on African practices leading to the taking and selling of slaves is interesting. Thus, this book is written for historian scholars, not for the average reader. It perhaps should be noted that the primary coverage is the period to approximately 1775, with a few references to later events; later books in this series cover the later period.
9 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Pulitzer Prize winner 10 April 2001
By Schmerguls - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This work won the 1967 Pulitzer prize for general non-fiction. Since other winners of that prize, e.g., The Guns of August(in 1963), The Making of the President, 1960,(in 1962--the first Pulitzer in this category) The Rising Sun (in 1971), and The Making of the Atomic Bomb (in 1988) have been very enjoyable reads, I decided to read this work. The topic is of interest,, but the author grubs in pre-1776 writing a lot, and I did not find I was caught up in the subject, important tho it is. The treatment is deep in theory, and intellectual history, and while at times this has interested me, I could not find myself enamored by the book--which is a reflection on me, not on the very erudite author.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback