The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Private Memoirs and C... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner (Penguin Classics) Paperback – 25 May 2006


See all 107 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 25 May 2006
£6.99
£1.92 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£6.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner (Penguin Classics) + Caleb Williams (Oxford World's Classics) + The Castle of Otranto: A Gothic Story (Oxford World's Classics)
Price For All Three: £16.67

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (25 May 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141441534
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141441535
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 1.9 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 463,103 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

... A work so moving, so funny, so impassioned, so exact and so mysterious that its emergence from a long history of neglect came as a surprise which has yet to lose its resonance ... The sinner says that his adventures will 'puzzle the world' and this is what they have done...but the heart of the matter is the energy, pathos and delusion of the human struggle, together with the ability to feel that those who are not with us, or like us, are against us... The Confessions is a postmodern work which is also a pre-modern work ... Hogg's novel is as complex as it is lucid and direct. This is the most reliable text we have, and until the manuscript is found it is the best text we shall ever have ! Peter Garside's annotation is magnificent: it is full, it helps the reader, and it illuminates the text !This truly is a great novel, and at last we have an edition worthy of it. -- David Hewit These attractive editions of Hogg's work are set directly from the original texts, and in the case of the Perils of Woman and The Shepherd's Calendar, actually represent the first ever republications of the originals ! Peter Garside's necessarily extensive and user-friendly introduction locates the novel firmly in its historical and geographical (Edinburgh and Ettrick) milieu, and relates the evolution of its reception and criticism from Enlightenment Scotland onwards ! He discusses the Justified Sinner alongside much of Hogg's other work, simultaneously helping to recontextualise the novel and reinvigorate perspectives on the less critically conspicuous texts. This new paperback edition provides everything that is in the hardback for just over a quarter of its price. Indeed, the non-specialist may regard the paperback edition as having the edge on more than price grounds, since in addition to reproducing the original text, notes, and introductions, it also includes Gillian Hughes's Chronology of James Hogg, which crams a lot of fact into its few pages, and a short but well-judged Select Bibliography. It is unquestionably the edition to have, in whatever format. This new edition of the Ettrick Shepherd's great work is an attempt to restore the original 1824 text to as close to its original format and content as possible. This has been admirably achieved and the prodigious text is accompanied by well researched and incisive notes which help to flesh it out...This Stirling/South Carolina Research Edition of Confessions is edited by Peter Garside, who provides a superb in-depth introduction to the text which includes a detailed historical background to the novel and the author himself...this edition goes a long way to peeling away the narrative layers to illuminate Hogg's genius for subversion and innovation. Garside and Campbell, together with the notes on the text, aid the resurrection of Confessions as a landmark in Scottish and world literature, a process which this series hopes to achieve for all Hogg's work. Hogg is finally assuming his rightful place alongside Burns and Scott as one of Scotland's greatest literary sons. ... A work so moving, so funny, so impassioned, so exact and so mysterious that its emergence from a long history of neglect came as a surprise which has yet to lose its resonance ... The sinner says that his adventures will 'puzzle the world' and this is what they have done...but the heart of the matter is the energy, pathos and delusion of the human struggle, together with the ability to feel that those who are not with us, or like us, are against us... The Confessions is a postmodern work which is also a pre-modern work ... Hogg's novel is as complex as it is lucid and direct. This is the most reliable text we have, and until the manuscript is found it is the best text we shall ever have ! Peter Garside's annotation is magnificent: it is full, it helps the reader, and it illuminates the text !This truly is a great novel, and at last we have an edition worthy of it. These attractive editions of Hogg's work are set directly from the original texts, and in the case of the Perils of Woman and The Shepherd's Calendar, actually represent the first ever republications of the originals ! Peter Garside's necessarily extensive and user-friendly introduction locates the novel firmly in its historical and geographical (Edinburgh and Ettrick) milieu, and relates the evolution of its reception and criticism from Enlightenment Scotland onwards ! He discusses the Justified Sinner alongside much of Hogg's other work, simultaneously helping to recontextualise the novel and reinvigorate perspectives on the less critically conspicuous texts. This new paperback edition provides everything that is in the hardback for just over a quarter of its price. Indeed, the non-specialist may regard the paperback edition as having the edge on more than price grounds, since in addition to reproducing the original text, notes, and introductions, it also includes Gillian Hughes's Chronology of James Hogg, which crams a lot of fact into its few pages, and a short but well-judged Select Bibliography. It is unquestionably the edition to have, in whatever format. This new edition of the Ettrick Shepherd's great work is an attempt to restore the original 1824 text to as close to its original format and content as possible. This has been admirably achieved and the prodigious text is accompanied by well researched and incisive notes which help to flesh it out...This Stirling/South Carolina Research Edition of Confessions is edited by Peter Garside, who provides a superb in-depth introduction to the text which includes a detailed historical background to the novel and the author himself...this edition goes a long way to peeling away the narrative layers to illuminate Hogg's genius for subversion and innovation. Garside and Campbell, together with the notes on the text, aid the resurrection of Confessions as a landmark in Scottish and world literature, a process which this series hopes to achieve for all Hogg's work. Hogg is finally assuming his rightful place alongside Burns and Scott as one of Scotland's greatest literary sons. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description

'A Scottish classic, a world classic' Ian Rankin, Observer --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
My life has been a life of trouble and turmoil; of change and vicissitude; of anger and exultation; of sorrow and of vengeance. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

114 of 120 people found the following review helpful By Depressaholic on 10 Aug. 2003
Format: Paperback
I picked this book up more or less at random, never having heard of it or Hogg before. Havng read it, I can't believe it doesn't have a higher profile as a classic of British literature, because it is one of the most startlingly original books I have ever read, and was well before its time in terms of structure and themes.
The book consists of two parallel narratives. The first is of an editor, who comes across the strange tale of a murder over 100 years after it occurred. The story is that of two estranged brothers, George Colwan and Robert Wringham. George is the heir to a lairdship, while Robert and his mother are thrown out of the estate because of her religious zeal and the possibility that Robert was fathered by another man (the sinister religious tutor for whom he is named). Burning with hate, Robert stalks George and a series of unpleasant episodes ensue which culminate in George's murder, and the disappearance of Robert and his mother. This is all told as a dry legal matter. The second narrative is Robert's diary, retelling the same events but with a decidedly supernatural twist. It is a brave move by the author to make the least sympethetic character in the book its narrator. Robert's actions are explained because he is morally unconstrained, because he has been told that his place in heaven is assured. As soon as he becomes aware of this, the stranger Gil-martin appears at his side, persuading him to do evil acts in the name of goodness, including the murder of his brother and his eventual flight and suicide.
There is so much to enjoy about this book. It is ostensibly an attack on predestination (the religious view that some people are chosen by God for heaven before they are born, and that nothing that they can do on earth alters this destiny).
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By I Reader on 12 Oct. 2006
Format: Paperback
Like most people i stumbled accross this book without any real knowledge on the author and the book itself.

After reading this book i was simply amazed as to how such a book has not managed to emerge on the public scene with the ferosity as some modern day novels. I read some of the reviews that suggested reading the book in various ways and provided some sort of descritpion as to the meaning etc etc.

JUST READ IT AS THE AUTHOR INTENDED and then take what you want from it. It is such an insightful book.

However, one note of warning, it is written in Old Scots, and as such some of the language may be difficult for some, yet there is a glossary at the end. As a relatively young scotsman, i had trouble with some words, as they are predominantly lothian and east coast. But dont let that put you off, it is well worth it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Stuart Bruce TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 2 Dec. 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After a slightly laborious beginning this turns into a stunningly clever novel. It tells the first half of the story from the point of view of 'the Editor', a man who is attempting to piece together an event that happened many years earlier- then the same events, and further events, as told from the personal diary of Robert Wringhim who in the first section had been 'the bad guy', but who in his own words is now distinctly ambiguous. Finally the tale is wrapped up in a 'present day' account of how 'the Editor' came into possession of the manuscript that he is publishing, accompanied by an incredible twist.

The novel deals intelligently with the idea of pre-destination and. In parts it treads the same path as the classic fale of Faust selling his soul to the Devil, in other places it seems to be dealing with schizophrenia, a century before it was medically identified.

The introduction to this Wordsworth Classic edition from David Blair is excellent too. Although placed at the front of the book, it is written in two parts, the first part to be read before the novel, which sets the scene in terms of Scottish politics of the day in which the novel is set, the second part to be read afterwards and which discusses the themes and conclusion and in my case provoked some ideas and twists I hadn't thought of.

Definitely worth a read and far superior to many other 19th century novels that are today considered 'classics'.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
41 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Jan. 2003
Format: Paperback
In this oft-overlooked classic, we are presented with parallel narratives, that of the editor and the 'sinner' himself, Robert Colwan. They tell apparently the same story, although there are elements in the editor's narrative that the sinner has excluded in his and vice versa. Neither narrator is particularly reliable. The supposedly impartial editor's savage bias against Robert is compounded by his certainty that he knows the whole story - when he is in fact recounting the tale from tradition, a notoriously unreliable source of accurate information. Robert is obviously unreliable for being such a vile, lying, duplicitous and religiously hypocritical sneak. His perversion of the Calvinistic doctrine of predestination lends him a superior attitude; something the editor has simply because he tells his version of the tale with all the rational pomposity of an omniscient being.
This makes 'Confessions of a Justified Sinner' an admittedly demanding read, but it is well worth it. We are challenged to accept that no truth can be uncovered in either narrative: the role Hogg gives himself towards the end of the novel allows him to disassociate himself with the editor's quest for the 'truth'. The main question, of course, is whether the Devil-figure, Gil-Martin, is the Devil himself or merely Robert's alter-ego, there to spur him on in to committing deeds his conscience would normally never allow. It should be noted that Gil-Martin first appears after Robert has been assured of his salvation by the abominable Reverend Wringhim. Evidence for and against Gil-Martin's existence appears throughout the novel. But whether he is real or not the point of Gil-Martin is to show that certain, twisted forms of Presbyterianism are sinful - not exactly distanced from the Devil itself, it would seem.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback