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Principles of Astrophysics: Using Gravity and Stellar Physics to Explore the Cosmos (Undergraduate Lecture Notes in Physics) [Kindle Edition]

Charles Keeton

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Product Description

Product Description

Provides a physics-centered analysis of a broad range of astronomical systems that appeals to a large audience of advanced undergraduate students in physics and engineering

This book gives a survey of astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level. It originates from a two-semester course sequence at Rutgers University that is meant to appeal not only to astrophysics students but also more broadly to physics and engineering students. The organization is driven more by physics than by astronomy; in other words, topics are first developed in physics and then applied to astronomical systems that can be investigated, rather than the other way around.

The first half of the book focuses on gravity. Gravity is the dominant force in many astronomical systems, so a tremendous amount can be learned by studying gravity, motion and mass. The theme in this part of the book, as well as throughout astrophysics, is using motion to investigate mass. The goal of Chapters 2-11 is to develop a progressively richer understanding of gravity as it applies to objects ranging from planets and moons to galaxies and the universe as a whole. The second half uses other aspects of physics to address one of the big questions. While “Why are we here?” lies beyond the realm of physics, a closely related question is within our reach: “How did we get here?” The goal of Chapters 12-20 is to understand the physics behind the remarkable story of how the Universe, Earth and life were formed. This book assumes familiarity with vector calculus and introductory physics (mechanics, electromagnetism, gas physics and atomic physics); however, all of the physics topics are reviewed as they come up (and vital aspects of vector calculus are reviewed in the Appendix).

From the Back Cover

This book gives a survey of astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level.  It originates from a two-semester course sequence at Rutgers University that is meant to appeal not only to astrophysics students but also more broadly to physics and engineering students.  The organization is driven more by physics than by astronomy; in other words, topics are first developed in physics and then applied to astronomical systems that can be investigated, rather than the other way around.

The first half of the book focuses on gravity.  Gravity is the dominant force in many astronomical systems, so a tremendous amount can be learned by studying gravity, motion and mass.  The theme in this part of the book, as well as throughout astrophysics, is using motion to investigate mass.  The goal of Chapters 2-11 is to develop a progressively richer understanding of gravity as it applies to objects ranging from planets and moons to galaxies and the universe as a whole. The second half uses other aspects of physics to address one of the big questions.   While “Why are we here?” lies beyond the realm of physics, a closely related question is within our reach: “How did we get here?”  The goal of Chapters 12-21 is to understand the physics behind the  remarkable story of how the Universe, Earth and life were formed. This book assumes familiarity with vector calculus and introductory physics (mechanics, electromagnetism, gas physics and atomic physics); however, all of the physics topics are reviewed as they come up (and vital aspects of vector calculus are reviewed in the Appendix).

This volume is aimed at undergraduate students majoring in astrophysics, physics or engineering.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5853 KB
  • Print Length: 434 pages
  • Publisher: Springer; 2014 edition (10 May 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00K9DWKPQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
4.0 out of 5 stars A Well Done Astrophysics Text Book 5 July 2014
By Michael Luciuk - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I have a Kindle version of this text on my iPad. The only negative aspect is that equations, and there are many equations, are hard to read without enlarging them. This is a typical issue for Kindle text books in physics and astronomy.
Keeton has given us a fine astrophysics text book. He clearly covers the subject matter and gives occasional examples to clarify the mathematics. Knowledge of calculus and physics is essential to get the most out of this text, but his prose is sufficiently clear for a casual reader to get the drift of his arguments even if the equations are only scanned.
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