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  • Primeval [Blu-ray] [2007] [US Import]
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Primeval [Blu-ray] [2007] [US Import]


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£5.93 Only 3 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by passionFlix UK.

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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: R (Restricted) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000OPOAG6
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 176,329 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Darth Maciek TOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Jan. 2008
Format: DVD
Movies about gigantic, man-eating crocodiles, are considered as the most difficult challenge for a director. The proof - Fellini, Bergman, Scorsese and Woody Allen never did one. I guess they just chickened out faced with the difficulty of the task. So this movie must be considered as a major achievement, because it is quite entertaining and not stupid at all and I believe you will enjoy it - except of course if your name is Gustave....

The story is about a giant crocodile, possibly as long as 30-feet, living in Burundi (Africa), in the wetlands surrounding the great Tanganyika Lake. Local population gave him the name Gustave. Now, Gustave is a devoted and accomplished man-eater. He is credited with eating hundreds of people during the last 30 years or so, when avoiding traps and hunters with ease (just getting some scars on his armour). It attracts finally an international attention after eating a renowned forensic anthropologist working for UN in Burundi. A great American newspaper organises an expedition to capture Gustave and bring it to USA. The movie tells the story of this ill fated expedition....

Now, this movie is nothing new. This is the same story we all saw many times on the screen. But there are some elements, which will probably make you appreciate this movie anyway.

First, there is the vision of Africa - this movie is surprisingly realistic and shows quite well the realities of a country still scarred by the recently (and not totally) finished civil war. Ultimately, the expedition will have to worry much more about a local warlord nicknamed Little Gustave, than about the "real" Gustave...

Then, there are dialogues. They are quite smart for a B-movie. No spoilers here - I will let you enjoy them.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jenny J.J.I. on 28 Aug. 2007
Format: DVD
When I was in kindergarten, we always used to sing this crocodile song (I forgot the name of) and according to the lyrics, her jaws were never closed because she always gossiped about the rest of the animal kingdom. Well now, the croc in "Primeval" answers to the name Gustave and his jaws are never closed neither, but for a completely different reason. Since the beginning of time, he reigns over the swamps & rivers in the poorest regions of Burundi and he supposedly devoured over 300 people already. Gustave normally just feeds on locals, so nobody in the Western world cares whether he lives or dies, but he now made the terrible mistake of eating a female white reporter and his quiet and peaceful days of over for good. A prominent American newspaper sends out an expedition, complete with reporters, local guides and a professional crocodile hunter, to capture Gustave alive.

When "Primeval" came out a couple of months ago, it already earned itself to be noted one of the worst films and receives one harshly negative review after the other. Quite undeservedly if you ask me, because it really isn't such a terrible movie and even benefices from a handful of good aspects, like a solid cast and engaging CGI-monster effects. The scriptwriters simply made one incomprehensible and unforgivable mistake! Why on earth did John D. Brancato and Michael Ferris had the ambition to use the premise of a low-brained monster feature to alert us about the disastrous political situation in Southern Africa? There's a 25-foot-long crocodile running amok and yet this movie mainly criticizes how the Western world shamelessly turned its back on the poverty & civil war issues in Burundi.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 2 Oct. 2007
Format: DVD
You know, I didn't think this film was bad at all. I think there's actually a lot more to the movie than some viewers expect, and so it is that some end up disappointed by the fact that death by crocodile doesn't stand at the center of every scene. Frankly, I find it rather inane for some individuals to claim they were snookered by the film's billing as a story about "the world's most prolific serial killer." Look at the DVD case, people - there's a great big crocodile on there. I'm also not going to fault Primeval for daring to go beyond the comfort zone of a mere killer monster movie, especially when it's helping to highlight the growing tragedies of civil war and genocide taking place in Africa (under the morally bankrupt UN's uncaring noses). One has to ask oneself exactly who the monster in this film really is - as far as I'm concerned, it's not the crocodile.

With so many reporters out there writing fake stories, I sort of like the idea of sending these corrupt conmen to deepest Africa in search of a nine-meter-long killer crocodile. That's the fate that befalls Tim Manfrey (Dominic Purcell) when he fails to verify the facts on a major story he writes. This crocodile, dubbed Gustave by the locals, has been killing villagers in Burundi for years, but "the world" only starts to care when he kills a UN forensics expert working on the mass graves full of people recently executed in this war-torn country. Aviva Masters (Brooke Langton), the network's animal specialist, is all gung ho to go, as is a famous herpetologist determined to catch the creature alive.
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