A Primate's Memoir: Love, Death and Baboons in East Africa and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons (Thorndike Adventure) Hardcover – Large Print, Aug 2001


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Large Print
"Please retry"
£59.02 £19.59
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 621 pages
  • Publisher: Thorndike Press; Lrg edition (Aug 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786234326
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786234325
  • Product Dimensions: 22.3 x 16.2 x 3.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,388,263 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Lynn Yarris "Newsday" "A Primate's Memoir" flies along like a well-paced and finely crafted novel...[giving] us a cast of characters as memorably colorful as any that Dickens ever created. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

One of the world's leading primatologists reinvents the traditional field research study with this exhilarating, hilarious and daring memoir of twenty-plus years studying a troop of baboons in Kenya. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 19 Jan 2003
Format: Paperback
As much fun to read as any book by Redmond O'Hanlon or Gerald Durrell, A Primate's Memoir is funny, irreverent, and full of adventure, while also being a serious scientific study of the savanna baboons of Kenya. Sapolsky's goal is to determine the relationship of baboon stress levels to their overall health over a period of years. A neuroscientist, he observes the social hierarchy and interactions of his baboon group, guesses which individuals appear to be most stressed or most relaxed and then checks their hormones and blood chemistry, not an easy procedure, given his clever and not always co-operative population.
The title of A Primate's Memoir is deliberately ambiguous--it is both Sapolsky's memoir and that of his baboon population, and his experiences and interactions with the outside world are remarkably similar to theirs. Leaving the relative safety of the game reserves and hitchhiking into dangerous territories during his "down time," Sapolsky describes his travels with enthusiasm, impeccable timing, and great, self-deprecating humor, subtly selecting details which show how similarly he and his baboon population deal with their worlds' uncertainties. Kenya is experiencing civil unrest and corruption; Uganda has just deposed Idi Amin; the Sudan is in the midst of a long civil war; the border of Zaire is under siege; and the Somalis refuse to accept any borders at all, stealing lands and property wherever they go--all dangerous and stressful atmospheres for their populations and for visitors like the author.
Sapolsky is a great story teller, however, equally entertaining in presenting both his adventures and his research, his world and that of his baboons. While life may be "nasty, brutish, and short," Sapolsky shows us it's a lot more fun if one keeps a sense of humor--and a lot less stressful.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ms. E. A. Thompson on 29 Aug 2002
Format: Paperback
Which is exactly what the author has done over his long career studying baboons. Starting with his early reasons for fascination with our close primate relatives, and narrowing down onto the particular baboon troop he studied, Robert Sapolsky has described with love and fervour the individuals he met, both human and baboon, during his stays in Africa. The lives of 'his' families, their relationships with each other (and occasionally with him), their trials and triumphs, and, finally, their destruction as a group through the carelessness and cupidity of their human neighbours, are all described with passion and outrage and fascination. A book to read and lend to as many people as possible!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kavey on 12 Mar 2004
Format: Paperback
During the course of this book, which is also a partial biography of the author's life and career, we follow Sapolsky's research in Kenya as he studies "his" baboons.
In the early years he concentrates on observing baboon behaviour and correlating it to levels of stress hormones. He analyses by taking samples after darting the individuals he has come to know so well. In later years his research evolves and we continue to learn about the characters he has introduced to us. We begin to understand the structure of baboon society and the similarities to our own instinctive behaviours. We begin to see the baboons as individuals with their own personalities and foibles.
Interspersed with the surprisingly captivating insights into baboons are Sapolsky's escapades in Kenya and surrounding countries. As well as providing entertainment and excitement these often provide astonishing lessons in the politics, history and current situation in the nations of East Africa.
We become familiar too with Sapolsky's African friends and discover fascinating facts about the various tribes and groups that share the land. On some occasions Sapolsky shares touching experiences with those he encounters. On other occasions we read, with some trepidation, about incidents where the resentments simmering below the surface explode out into the open.
The entire account is exceptionally well-written and is both touching and disturbing, both informative and entertaining.
Whether you're an Africaphile or not, if you enjoy travel literature at all, I strongly recommend this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 16 Jan 2006
Format: Paperback
As much fun to read as any book by Redmond O'Hanlon or Gerald Durrell, A Primate's Memoir is funny, irreverent, and full of adventure, while also being a serious scientific study of the savanna baboons of Kenya. Sapolsky's goal is to determine the relationship of baboon stress levels to their overall health over a period of years. A neuroscientist, he observes the social hierarchy and interactions of his baboon group, guesses which individuals appear to be most stressed or most relaxed and then checks their hormones and blood chemistry, not an easy procedure, given his clever and not always co-operative population. Sapolsky, who works alone, must first outwit the baboon, use a blowgun to dart him, follow and wait for him to become unconscious, and then carry him half a mile or more to his portable lab facilities, where he then draws blood and does measurements. The baboons, of course, react to stress the way humans do.
The title of A Primate's Memoir is deliberately ambiguous--it is both Sapolsky's memoir and that of his baboon population, and his experiences and interactions with the outside world are remarkably similar to theirs. Leaving the relative safety of the game reserves and hitchhiking into dangerous territories during his "down time," Sapolsky describes his travels with enthusiasm, impeccable timing, and great, self-deprecating humor, subtly selecting details which show how similarly he and his baboon population deal with their worlds' uncertainties.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback