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Jla Presents Aztek The Ultimate Man TP (Justice League (DC Comics) (paperback)) Paperback – 9 May 2008

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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (9 May 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401216889
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401216887
  • Product Dimensions: 16.9 x 1.5 x 26 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 733,210 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Grant Morrison is one of comics' greatest innovators. His long list of credits includes 'Batman:Arkham Asylum', 'JLA', 'Seven Soldiers', 'Animal Man', 'Doom Patrol', 'The Invisibles' and 'The Filth'. He is currently writing 'Batman' and 'All-Star Superman'.

Product Description

About the Author

Grant Morrison is one of comics' greatest innovators. His long list of credits includes Batman: Arkham Asylum, JLA, Seven Soldiers, Animal Man, Doom Patrol, The Invisibles and The Filth. He is currently writing Batman and All-Star Superman. Mark Millar is one of comics' most commercially successful writers, whose work includes Wanted, Judge Dredd, Superman Adventures, JLA, Ultimate X-Men, Superman: Red Son, The Authority and the bestselling The Ultimates. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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By 365 Graphic Novels on 12 April 2012
Format: Paperback
This could be a great story from a great author but it suffers from the same thing many DC titles do and that is Gratuitous Cameo Syndrome. This is an interesting tale of an Aztec trained warrior trying to blend into American society inconspicuously whilst awaiting the arrival of the impending apocalypse. This would be a neat little concept as our hero commits all sorts of social bloopers and we get to laugh with him at how ridiculous both he and society are in equal measure. Sadly the book has to be invaded by other name brand DC characters that just seem to pop up to get someone a royalty cheque. It's annoying but not insurmountable.

The world is good and really helped along by the art. It is present day but has that Dick Tracy/ Batman feel. You could almost think you are reading one of the original Detective Comics issues as the style and palette are very similar. I liked this `timeless' touch. The villains have a very Al Capone feel to them and may have been exiled from Gotham City. There is some good characterisation and you can really feel for Aztek when he isn't bleating about his membership to the JLA or whatever super team. There are some good laughs including the Superhero Registration form he is made to fill in by the police department. It was that genius gag that secures this title the Thumbs Up!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you've read the Grant Morrison JLA trades then you may have seen Aztek before as a new Justice League member. This volume provides back story and fleshes out the character somewhat.

Overall it's a vaguely interesting origin type story showing Aztek early days attempting to get a secret identity and move into a new city assuming the mantle of it's resident superhero. The look at the idea of cities having their own heroes of varying qualities is humourous and well written. Somewhat reminded me of the setup for the Tick.

Artwork feels a little old a this point, hopefully they release an recoloured edition to match up with the superb new versions of the JLA collections.

It's a interesting side project and fills out some story around a character that came out of nowhere in the JLA storyline, but it's probably not weighty enough to really stand out on it's own,
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Not Morrison's best. . . 1 Jan. 2013
By Jeff F - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This trade collects all 10 issues of the Aztek series. Being a big fan of Grant Morrison's JLA run (and, to a lesser extent, Mark Millar's Ultimates), I decided to check this brief series out, since the character of Aztek was one of the underdeveloped aspects in Morrison's JLA storyline. In terms of inventiveness, this is not Morrison's best work. I've grown accustomed to weird ideas and a comfortable middle road between Silver Age wackyness and "enlightened" contemporary sensibilties in Morrison's comics. The Aztek series does attempt to update some of the common tropes, conventions, and cliches of superhero comics (i.e. how superheroes are named, maintaining a secret identity, the superhero's girlfriend, teaming up with other heroes, etc.), and Morrison and Millar's writing is at its best when parodying and reinvigorating these tropes, conventions, and cliches. However, there's a fundamental problem with Aztek: he's just not all that interesting of a character. The backstory of the Q-Group, who trained Aztek, also remains undeveloped in this series. After issue 10, the series was cancelled, leaving the backstory unexplained and multiple subplots that were just getting started unresolved. N. Steven Harris' and Keith Champagne's art leaves a little to be desired; they use a somewhat minimalist style that was popular in the late 90s in comics, possibly as a reaction to all the artists attempting to draw like Rob Liefield. While Harris' and Champagne's art mostly works, it often renders the action scenes incomprehensible; a reader might have to reread a page a few times just to understand it all. The moral of the story is, if you like Grant Morrison's comics, look elsewhere. Best start with his run on JLA.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I recommend it. 13 Nov. 2011
By Ragdoll - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm not really going to review the book but I will say I thought the story was great and its a good prequel to Morrison's JLA. Also I really liked the art, it felt gritty, had a lot of movement and a great sense of pacing. After I ordered my copy I'll admit I was worried my book would arrive with issues missing but it came whole and I couldn't recommend it higher. If you're reading Morrison's JLA and want to know more about that guy Aztek who keeps showing up, get this. Oh yeah, the Joker makes a pretty awesome appearance as well.
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
DC at it's best 4 Jun. 2008
By Gwadovski - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
First off, I don't actually own this book - I have the comics in their single issue format. If what the previous reviewer wrote is true (that 40 pages of the original 10-issue run of Aztek comics wasn't printed in this book), then I should have given this book only 1 star for being such a disappointing let-down. For those who don't know, this series (in addition to Morrison's work on Animal Man after the original Crisis on Infinite Earths) really put Grant Morrison on the map as a true inovator in the world of comic book literature. Although it's a shame DC waited over 10 years to reprint this awesome series, I was very pleased to see it's finally here. If you enjoyed the raw, dark, gritty style of DC comics from the early and mid-90's (ie the death of Superman, the crippling of Batman, Hal Jordan (as Green Lantern)'s psychological melt-down and killing spree upon his fellow Green Lantern Corps, etc.) then you will definately appreciate this book. If you enjoy Grant Morrison's intelligent and page-turning style, here's a look at some of his most creative and original material. Aztek is truly one of DC's best titles of all time, and it would be a real crime against their company's heritage and one of their most important authors to not reprint every page of this story - but it should also include the issue of JLA where Aztek sacrifices himself to save Earth shortly after this series ended.
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Might be nice, if it had been finished. 5 Aug. 2008
By Kid Kyoto - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Created by superstar writers Mark Millar and Grant Morrison Aztek could have been a great comic but it came at the wrong time. A victim of the collapse of the comics industry in the late 90s it was cancelled after less than a year.

Reading it you can see there was a long-term plan. But the final issue ends with literally a dozen storylines unfinished. The hero joins the Justice League and is killed off soon after.

If Morrison or Millar were to ever return to Aztek I'd raise my rating but as it stands the reader is left frustrated.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I like Aztek, I read this and high school and ... 30 Nov. 2014
By Ed Force2 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like Aztek, I read this and high school and loved it. want to see him in the new 52
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