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Postcards From A Young Man
 
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Postcards From A Young Man

20 Sept. 2010 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £4.35 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:27
30
2
3:35
30
3
3:47
30
4
3:25
30
5
3:22
30
6
3:47
30
7
4:23
30
8
3:06
30
9
3:39
30
10
4:14
30
11
3:38
30
12
3:18
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 17 Sept. 2010
  • Release Date: 20 Sept. 2010
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 43:41
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0041JJFJ8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 16,605 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mr K on 21 Sept. 2010
Format: Audio CD
When I first listened to "Postcards" I was a touch disappointed. I was not expecting a repeat of the brilliant "Journal" but even so the initial impression of "Send Away The Tigers" pt 2 left me lukewarm. It all seemed a bit overblown. However repeated listens have allowed details to emerge and the elements to coalesce into a wonderful noise.

The first 3 tracks are polished to a burnished rock gleam, and despite being a bit ridiculous (and the Manics have never been afraid of the ridiculous, thank goodness), are glorious. The album opener "It's Not War..." starts with a lovely, slightly scuffy riff before the strings sweep in like it's 1996. Anthemic and then some.
The title track follows in a similar vein. Whilst railing against the loss of principles the song soars until the defiant coda, ending with "I will not give up and I will not give in." Corny as hell, but wow, they are good at this kind of thing.
"Some Kind of Nothingness" is a fabulously over the top epic ballad featuring Ian McCulloch, choirs and a kitchen sink. Terribly sad yet utterly euphoric.
Things calm down a bit with "The Descent". In fact it sounds a bit tame, a bit sedate. Not bad, just...OK.
I thought Hazleton Avenue was a bit of a stinker on first listen, but I'm liking it more now. The riff is lovely, but the strings are perhaps too much here.
"Auto-Intoxication" is a throwback to an earlier Manics at times with it's choppy guitar and obvious politics. I like it a lot.
"Golden Platitudes" is a graceful and reflective ballad about political betrayal. In the context of this album quite understated.
As is "I Think I've Found It" which has at times an almost 80's indie feel, and a lovely lilting rhythm.
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48 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Pinky on 21 Sept. 2010
Format: Audio CD
(It's not war) Just the end of love

Opens with a lovely, dirty guitar arpeggio then quickly descends into a very catchy pop song. I say 'pop' rather than rock as the Manics are clearly putting out a very radio friendly song as their first single from the album. Despite this (or because of it), it remains (for me) the weakest song on the album. I doubt it will grow as I've heard it more than any other song at this point. This song is the Manics on autopilot which means it's good, just not great.

6/10

Postcards from a young man

This is more like it and gives a better indicator of what the Manics are setting out to do with this album. The song is melodic and accessible while maintaining a creative flourish that really lifts the song into greatness. James' guitar playing is restrained throughout and a lovely melodic riff underpins the start of the song. The verse is driven by piano and the guitar takes a back seat, though when the chorus arrives the guitar once again kicks in and carries the song completely. Strings are used throughout to great effect, the whole song builds to a lovely crescendo.

9/10

Some kind of nothingness

Continuing the Manics tradition of cracking duets, Ian McCullough joins in for a lofty, string driven ballad. Although a ballad, schmaltz is thankfully very far away and the chorus is joined by a Gospel choir. Once again we have a melodic, radio friendly song that should certainly be a candidate for a single.

8/10

The Descent (Pages 1&2)

The Descent kicks in with a mildly distorted descending guitar chord sequence which seques into the 1st verse as the guitar arpeggios in the background carry the melody.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By zoek5m on 24 Sept. 2010
Format: Audio CD
I love this album. I'm so enthusiastic about it that I'm writing my first review.
Took a few listens to really get into it but its deffinitely something special. You can tell they have put a lot of effort into it and it pays off.
My Favourite song is 'Postcards from a Young man' but there are numerous others that I just keep having to go back an listen to. This album is addictive!
The lyrics are beautiful also.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Miss R. L. Rettinger on 26 Dec. 2010
Format: MP3 Download
First of all, i really can't understand all of the negative reviews for this album. I decided to listen to it a few times before writing a review and i can honestly say it's a stunning piece of work.
I will be honest, this is the first Manics album i have ever downloaded(i am building up my collection with their other stuff!) and their music isn't something i would normally listen to - i am into electronic music mainly.
I have heard the recent singles on the radio and fell in love with them instantly - always liked earlier Manics singles, The Everlasting, There By The Grace of God, Motorcycle Emptiness so i decided to go for it and put it on my ipod.
I haven't stopped listening to it, it's full of gorgeous melodies, intelligent lyrics and James' soaring vocals.
The production is fantastic with some stunning backing vocals from the gospel choir - Golden Platitudes is one of the most sublime songs i've ever heard.
This is real music, and anyone who loves and appreciates music should own this. Well done lads, i am spending my christmas money on your back catalogue!!
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