Poseidon's Spear (The Long War Book 3) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£0.33
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: EXCELLENT value for money and ready for dispatch. Delivery normally within 3/4 days. Our reputation is built on our Speedy Delivery Service and our Customer Service Team. EXCELLENT value for money and ready for dispatch. Delivery normally within 3/4 days. Our reputation is built on our Speedy Delivery Service and our Customer Service Team.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Poseidon's Spear (Long War 3) Hardcover – 13 Sep 2012

54 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£11.88 £0.32



Product details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Orion (13 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1409114112
  • ISBN-13: 978-1409114116
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 3.4 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 281,874 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Christian Cameron (Also Miles Cameron, author of the 'Red Knight' and 'Fell Sword') was born in the US, in Pittsburg PA, in 1962 and grew up in Rochester, NY and Iowa City, Iowa, as well as Rockport MA. He attended high school at McQuaid Jesuit High School in Rochester NY and got an honors BA in Medieval History at the University of Rochester. After University, Mr. Cameron joined the United States Navy as an Ensign, serving in VS 31 as an air intelligence officer and gaining his Air Observer wings before going to spend the rest of his military career as a humint officer, first with NCIS and later with DHS, serving in the first Gulf War, Somalia, and central Africa on numerous occasions. Mr. Cameron left the US military in 2000 as a Lieutenant Commander.

While still serving in the Navy, Mr. Cameron proposed his first novel with his father (Kenneth Cameron, American novelist and playwright) to Harper Collins UK, which was published in 1996 as 'Night Trap" in the UK and "Rules of Engagement" in the United States. In 2002, Mr. Cameron wrote his first solo novel, "Washington and Caesar," published by Harper Collins in the UK and Random House in the US. Also in 2002, Mr. Cameron moved to Canada and married his wife, Sarah. They have one child, Beatrice. They live in Toronto.

Mr. Cameron is a passionate historical reenactor, with interests in the American Revolution (www.csmid.com) and the Persian wars (www.plataians.org) and the Middle Ages. His author website is www.hippeis.com. His author website at Miles Cameron is www.traitorson.com

Product Description

Review

[Arimnestos of Plataea] is transferred from land to water as he travels to Sicily, Rome, Etruria, Spain and even Britain, to come full circle as he prepares to return to Plataea and the never-ending war. The ending is as exciting as it is unexpected (GOOD BOOK GUIDE) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

A gripping novel in the Long War series from the master of historical fiction.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. I. Harrison on 24 Sept. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Christian Cameron is now starting to emerge as one of the leading historical novelists of the day. I first read 'Tyrant' some 5 years or so ago and loved the deep Hellenic flavour and character depth of the cast list but thought the style too slow to gain mainstream popularity. Then he seemed to swing to far over to the 'action packed' super hero stylee and I felt lost something as a result, though he seemed to gain mass appeal. Now he seems to have his writing absolutely spot on! Perfectly balanced between historic detail and action. His character's are flawed and believable, his story lines are random enough to keep you on your toes and his heroes though super tough are now fallible, and don't always get the girl.

All of which means I find myself giving him an unprecedented third 5 star award!

Plot synopsis (as unspoiling as possible)

This was a wonderful little greek Odyssey, seemingly inspired well by THE Odyssey. Arimnestos returns from Marathon to find trajedy waiting for him at home and decides to end it all by throwing himself off a cliff. He is pulled out of the waters and saved from probable death only to be lashed to an oar as a galley slave by his seeming saviours. This marks a two year voyage that will see him escape.. (come on it would have been a damn boring book otherwise) jion a brotherhood, indulge in a bit more piracy, brave the Atlantic, pop to Britian..... Look it's a huge adventure best not spoilt by the likes of me!

What Cameron can do better probably even than Cornwell and Robert Low now, is write a chaotic historical yarn that still gels as a story rather than feeling just like a random series of events.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dignitas on 18 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback
As a history of Ancient Greece, it's hard to fault Poseidon's Spear, but as a historical novel it is deeply flawed. Maybe that is what lies at the root of the novel's problems, that the budding academic in Cameron forgot he was writing fiction, when what he really wanted to write was a book on trade in Classical Greece.

Firstly, my big problem was of the literary flavour. The jacket carries the tag 'an epic quest for revenge,' which would give the reader the idea that this book is going to be a story driven by a revenge plot, a storyline that is not resolved in this volume. It is nothing of the sort, rather a travelogue of trading in the Mediterranean and Iron Age Spain, France and Britain (which bizarrely jumps between the Greek and Roman names of places), leaving the story drifting along, and lacking the plot to thrust it forward. The novel really struggles to get going, and I struggled to get excited about it, nothing really gripping happened until page 150, but even then it was like a beached-whale. The book did improve near the end, but it could have really ended twenty pages earlier, which would have left it with a much stronger conclusion. Plot wise, it repeated the same motifs of previous Cameron books (even the same turn of phrase), and its starting to make the author predictable. What was most disappointing is the brief slavery storyline, I had enjoyed this in Killer of Men, and thought that Cameron's return to the theme would have been a deeper exploration of slavery and the exploitation of human life in Ancient Greece, but disappointingly it turns out it was just a plot device. And this is what I finished the book feeling, that this was not a novel in its own right, just a way for Cameron to manoeuvre Arimnestos into position for Artemesium and Thermopylae.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steve160k on 13 Jan. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
While the first two books in the series - 'Killer Of Men' & 'Marathon' - are excellent reading, 'Poseidon's Spear' starts off in the same vein, with the added ingredient of Dagon thrown into the mix, and we do get to see a different side of Arimnestos through out most of the book.

But, there are just a few too many trips on the ocean waves, like driving up and down the motorway and stopping at every service station, too many stops to really keep track of the journey.

As far as historical accuracy goes, the tin trade was obviously pivotal to the survival of the different cultures, ports, and those who risked life and limb extracting it from the mines. This is very well researched, and plays a large part in the book.

While the story flows along at a good pace, several times we re-read the all too familiar stranded at sea with no food or water, which gets a little repetitive, along with the ships battles.

Towards the end of the book some of the old characters reappear, and remind you of the first two books, and you wish the story continued on dry land with some of the familiar characters from the battle of marathon.

This third book in the series is slightly disappointing, and some previous reviews seem a bit 'author biased', regardless of the actual content. Even some of the best authors can have a bad day at the office.

We will have to wait for the next installment of the tale of Arimnestos, and hope he gets back on dry land more often, hopefully back in the direction of Plataea.

For me, just four stars this time round.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback