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Porn.Com: Making Sense of Online Pornography (Digital Formations) [Paperback]

Feona Attwood
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Book Description

4 Dec 2009 Digital Formations (Book 48)
Pornography has always been central to debates about sex and emerging new media technologies. Today, debate is increasingly focused on online pornographies. This collection examines pornography's significance as a focus of definition, debate, and myth; its development as a mainstream entertainment industry; and the emergence of the new economy of Porn 2.0, and of new types of porn labor and professionalism. It looks at porn style behind the scenes of straight hardcore, in gay, lesbian, and queer pornographies, in shock sites, and in amateur erotica, and investigates the rise of the online porn fan community, the sex blogger, the erotic rate-me site and the visual cultures of swingers. Treating these developments as part of a broader set of economic and cultural transformations, this book argues that new porn practices reveal much about contemporary and competing views of sex and the self, the real and the body, culture, and commerce.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 287 pages
  • Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing Inc; 1 edition (4 Dec 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1433102072
  • ISBN-13: 978-1433102073
  • Product Dimensions: 14.4 x 21.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 740,295 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

'porn.com' is an outstanding contribution to the emerging field of online porn studies, examining the intersection of online sociability and erotic content, and providing important insights about both. Online fan cultures and a democratization of production have affected the porn industry as they have all sectors of the communication industry, but these new forms represent a diverse range of practices, values, and challenges that defy attempts at reductive description. The chapters of 'porn.com' provide a tour of this new and rapidly changing erotic landscape, and a detailed analysis of the contexts in which these interactions take place. The collection should be of interest not only to those who are engaged in porn studies, but to anyone who wants to understand the broad range of contexts in which online interaction takes place. (Alex Halavais, Quinnipiac University) The internet has become the key site of contemporary debates around the effects of pornography on communities and individuals. Anxieties are widespread about the impact of online porn on the sexualities and attitudes of young people and on the capacity of paedophiles to establish networks for sharing images. Feona Attwood's new edited collection is a timely addition to this debate, bringing together an impressive range of international scholars on porn studies to explore such themes as the production and consumption of online porn, the evolution of the industry, and the content of sex blogging and amateur online erotica. This book is a valuable contribution to an intensifying global debate. (Brian McNair, University of Strathclyde, United Kingdom) This anthology positions net porn at the throbbing centre of society. If you're ready for some uncensored scholarship on porn cultures in the digital age, this is the reader for you. Beyond good or evil, 'porn.com' provides us with a broad overview of topics such as child pornography, the working conditions of porn professionals, Web 2.0 cultures, extreme imagery, image rating, and insights into the online 'swinging' world. So let's praise the researchers and blast the moralists! (Geert Lovink, Dutch-Australian media theorist and net critic)

About the Author

The Editor: Feona Attwood teaches media and communication studies at Sheffield Hallam University in the United Kingdom. Her research interests include new pornographies, online sex practices, and controversial images. She is the editor of Mainstreaming Sex: The Sexualization of Western Culture (2009) and the co-editor of two journal special issues: Controversial Images (with Sharon Lockyer, Popular Communication, 2009) and Researching and Teaching Sexually Explicit Media (with I.Q. Hunter, Sexualities, 2009).

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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Making Sense of Nonsense 23 April 2010
By Neutral VINE VOICE
Format:Hardcover
In Victorian times pornography was a sub-culture, known to its participants but invisible to society as a whole. By the mid-twentieth century it was sufficiently visible for the men in dirty raincoats to visit the Windmill Theatre and Soho to pay exhorbitant prices for whatever excitement it provided for their drab lives. The "progressive" elements of the Establishment updated the definition of obscenity in such a manner that it immediately encouraged Lady Chatterley's Lover to become a best seller. Although the relevant legal definition, still used by the British Board of Film Censors, is whether a film has "a tendency to deprave and corrupt a significant proportion of its likely audience" it's clear the internet is now a case of anything goes. The expansion of the formerly pornographic into mainstream film via the internet suggests censorship is barely (pardon the pun) enforceable. In considering the expansion of porn on the internet this group of essayists examine the pratices, style and culture of pornography in contemporary society.

Pornography is no longer the depiction of eroticism as the respectable face (well perhaps not face) of sexual relations but a series of representations depicting a variety of sexual acts with sub-themes involving race, sexual orientation, bodily functions, violence, degradation (especially of females), social actions, including dogging, wife swapping, swinging, incest (usually simulated but often presented as real) and age related (from lolita to granny porn). Most of it is available as clips on a variety of sites which protect the anonymity of the user but often serve as conduits for viruses. Hardcore has become so viewable that it is no longer core or hard.
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